March 10, 2019 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

March 10, 2019

1. H.R.1 [116th] For the People Act of 2019
2. H.R.1044 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
3. H.R.1263 [116th] National Firearms Amendments Act of 2019
4. H.R.8 [116th] Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019
5. H.Res.109 [116th] Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal.
6. S.311 [116th] Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act
7. H.Res.179 [116th] Recognizing the importance of vaccinations and immunizations in the United States.
8. S.386 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
9. H.R.1 [115th] An Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.
10. H.R.1384 [116th] To establish an improved Medicare for All national health insurance program.

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources – Congress.gov Resources

VW warns on jobs as margins slip, electric plans accelerate | Reuters


Volkswagen will cut jobs as it speeds up the rollout of less labor-intensive electric cars and battles to reverse a slide in profit margins, the German carmaker said on Tuesday.

The company said it planned to launch almost 70 new electric models by 2020, aiming to put itself at the forefront of the industry’s shift to zero-emissions driving following the 2015 scandal over its cheating of U.S. diesel emissions tests.

Source: VW warns on jobs as margins slip, electric plans accelerate | Reuters

New York attorney general is investigating Trump projects: NY Times | Reuters


The New York attorney general’s office is looking into ties between Deutsche Bank and Investors Bank and several Trump Organization projects, the New York Times reported late Monday.

Deutsche Bank has lent Trump Organization hundreds of millions of dollars for real estate ventures and is one of the few major lenders that has given large amounts of credit to Trump after a string of bankruptcies at his hotel and casino businesses during the 1990s.

The newspaper said the new civil investigation into Deutsche was prompted by congressional testimony last month of Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen.

Source: New York attorney general is investigating Trump projects: NY Times | Reuters

Doomed with Democrats, Trump’s budget boosts Pentagon, targets safety net | Reuters


Like past presidential budget proposals, Trump’s plan was highly unlikely to become law.

It was immediately panned by Democrats, who control the House of Representatives and blocked Trump’s push for border wall funding in a standoff that led last year to a five-week partial federal government shutdown.

The $4.7 trillion plan asks for $8.6 billion to build a wall on the border with Mexico – more than six times what Congress gave Trump for border projects in each of the past two fiscal years, and 6 percent more than he has corralled by invoking emergency powers this year after he failed to get the money he wanted.

Source: Doomed with Democrats, Trump’s budget boosts Pentagon, targets safety net | Reuters

UK attorney general says no legal means of exiting backstop unilaterally | Reuters


Attorney General Geoffrey Cox said on Tuesday a revised divorce deal with the European Union had not given Britain legal means of exiting the so-called backstop arrangement unilaterally if “intractable differences” arose.

Cox’s advice is crucial to winning over eurosceptic members of parliament in Prime Minister Theresa May’s Conservative Party, and she had hoped that revisions to a Brexit deal over the Irish backstop, or protocol, secured late on Monday would offer enough assurances to get her deal through parliament.

Source: UK attorney general says no legal means of exiting backstop unilaterally | Reuters

Britain joins Boeing suspensions, investigators probe Ethiopia crash | Reuters


Britain joined a growing wave of suspensions of Boeing 737 MAX aircraft around the world on Tuesday, escalating the global alarm after a crash in Ethiopia that killed 157 people in the second such disaster for the model in the past few months.

The decision by one of the industry’s most established regulators was the most serious setback yet for Boeing in the wake of Sunday’s crash and put pressure on regulators in the rest of Europe and the United States to follow suit.

Source: Britain joins Boeing suspensions, investigators probe Ethiopia crash | Reuters

Which way do Dems go in 2020? | TheHill


It’s started way, way too early, but there’s nothing we can do about it. The 2020 presidential campaign is well underway.

And, of course, with no serious Republican having the guts to challenge President Trump – Where are you, Jeff Flake, when the country needs you? — all the excitement is on the Democratic side.

For Democrats, there are two big questions: Who’s running? And what’s the Democratic message?

Or: Will the Democratic Party blow it by veering too far left?

Source: Press: Which way do Dems go in 2020? | TheHill

The tax cuts will make fighting future recessions complicated


Ten years after hitting rock bottom, the economy is still going strong. But it is never too soon to think about responding to the next recession.

The Federal Reserve may be unable to cut interest rates very much in a future downturn because even today rates are within striking range of the zero lower bound.

Unfortunately, another key part of the fiscal policy portfolio, which is the automatic response of taxes, will be compromised.

Indeed, the 2017 tax cuts will make it more difficult to fight off a future downturn.

Source: The tax cuts will make fighting future recessions complicated

Coal is king in India—and will likely remain so


India’s ambitious renewable energy goals have received a lot of international attention, but coal still provides half of India’s commercial primary energy and is the dominant fuel for power generation.

In “Coal in India: Adjusting to transition,” Rahul Tongia and I state that we expect coal to remain the dominant fuel in the power sector in India, through 2030 and beyond.

Source: Coal is king in India—and will likely remain so

Political and Economic Instability in Algeria


The acute risk of political instability has been growing steadily in Algeria since early 2019.

The decision by President Abdelaziz Bouteflika to seek a fifth consecutive term in elections scheduled for April 2019, despite his poor health, sparked the largest political protests in Algeria in over two decades. Whether Bouteflika will remain a candidate and who Algeria’s next president will be are still unclear.

Meanwhile, the Algerian National People’s Assembly has succumbed to a crippling leadership struggle and the military, historically Algeria’s bastion of stability, is in flux after almost all senior military leaders were replaced over the last six months.

Algeria’s economy is also stagnating as a short-lived bounce from a 2018 expansionary fiscal policy dissipates, and analysts predict an increase in unemployment in 2019.

Source: Political and Economic Instability in Algeria