April 14, 2019 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

April 14, 2019

1. H.R.1044 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
2. H.R.25 [116th] FairTax Act of 2019
3. H.R.1957 [116th] Taxpayer First Act of 2019
4. H.Res.109 [116th] Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal.
5. H.R.1644 [116th] Save the Internet Act of 2019
6. S.386 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
7. H.R.5 [116th] Equality Act
8. H.R.1585 [116th] Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019
9. H.R.1 [116th] For the People Act of 2019
10. H.R.5428 [115th] Stand with UK against Russia Violations Act

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources – Congress.gov Resources

BlackRock quarterly profit beats, assets under management top $6 trillion | Reuters

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BlackRock Inc, the world’s largest asset manager, reported a better-than-expected first-quarter profit and garnered tens of billions of new investor cash as global financial markets rebounded from a volatile fourth quarter.

Net income attributable to BlackRock fell to $1.05 billion, or $6.61 per share, in the three months ended March 31, from $1.09 billion, or $6.68 per share, a year earlier. Analysts expected a profit of $6.13 per share, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

Source: BlackRock quarterly profit beats, assets under management top $6 trillion – Reuters

Credit denial in the age of AI


In this paper, I review the history of credit and the risks of discriminatory practices. I discuss how AI alters the dynamics of credit denials and what policymakers and banking officials can do to safeguard consumer lending.

AI has the potential to alter credit practices in transformative ways and it is important to ensure that this happens in a safe and prudent manner.

Source: Credit denial in the age of AI

The uphill road: battery limitations to test China’s electric vehicle ambitions | Reuters


The problem adds to drawbacks which have hindered wider acceptance – EVs have shorter driving ranges than gasoline vehicles anyway, are more expensive and take a long time to recharge.

China, Europe and the U.S. state of California have set ambitious requirements for automakers to dramatically increase EV sales over the next 5-10 years, but those goals are at risk unless EVs can come close to matching gasoline engine cars in cost and ease of use.

Source: The uphill road: battery limitations to test China’s electric vehicle ambitions – Reuters

Huawei says not discussed 5G chipsets with Apple, wins more telco gear contracts | Reuters


China’s Huawei Technologies said on Tuesday it has not held talks with Apple Inc about supplying 5G chipsets, a day after its founder said it was open to selling such chips to the U.S. firm which has yet to unveil dates for a next-gen iPhone.

Apple is behind rivals such as South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co and Huawei in delivering a phone equipped with fifth-generation (5G) modems that is expected to provide fresh momentum in a slumping global smartphone market.

Source: Huawei says not discussed 5G chipsets with Apple, wins more telco gear contracts – Reuters

Italy’s UniCredit to pay $1.3 billion to settle U.S. sanctions probe | Reuters


Italy’s top bank UniCredit SpA and two subsidiaries have agreed to pay $1.3 billion to U.S. authorities to settle probes of violations of U.S. sanctions on Iran and other countries, U.S. authorities said on Monday.

In addition, UniCredit Bank AG, the bank’s German unit, agreed to plead guilty to federal and New York state criminal charges for illegally moving hundreds of millions of dollars through the U.S. financial system on behalf of sanctioned entities, the U.S. Department of Justice and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said.

Source: Italy’s UniCredit to pay $1.3 billion to settle U.S. sanctions probe – Reuters

House panels issue subpoenas to Deutsche Bank, others in Trump probe | Reuters

Two U.S. House of Representatives committees have issued subpoenas to multiple financial institutions, including Deutsche Bank AG, for information on President Donald Trump’s finances, the panels’ Democratic leaders said on Monday.

“The potential use of the U.S. financial system for illicit purposes is a very serious concern. The Financial Services Committee is exploring these matters, including as they may involve the president and his associates, as thoroughly as possible,” the committee’s chair, Maxine Waters, said in a statement.

Source: House panels issue subpoenas to Deutsche Bank, others in Trump probe – Reuters

House Homeland Committee wants more cyber funding for DHS | FCW


Twenty-eight members of the House Homeland Security Committee are urging appropriators to boost cyber funding at the Department of Homeland Security above what the White House has requested.

In a letter sent to the House Appropriations Committee, the signatories — including Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and ranking member Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) — asked for a raise in the spending cap for DHS cyber spending, saying years of flat funding levels at the department will not be enough to “properly resource” the newly established Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and its mission.

Source: House Homeland Committee wants more cyber funding for DHS — FCW

Senators wonder why we need Space Force | FCW


The Senate Armed Services Committee held its first hearing to consider the Defense Department’s proposal to launch a Space Force. Lawmakers still aren’t sold that a separate space military service needs to exist.

Senators across party lines questioned the potential redundancy and increased bureaucracy that could come with creating a Space Force at the April 11 hearing.

DOD leadership, however, insisted that focusing on warfighting capability while utilizing existing professionals would be the proposed new service’s best use case, helping shift culture, investments and advancing ahead of growing threats.

Source: Senators wonder why we need Space Force — FCW

Recycle Your Batteries, Before China Wins That Race, Too | Defense One


The advances in energy storage and the advent of the li-ion battery are fueling a new technology revolution – in our consumer products, the automotive industry, energy storage and grid management, and the internet of things.

While headlines tout the newest smartphone release or advance in electric vehicle adoption, a race for the materials that power this innovation revolution has been underway for years. And as a country, we’re falling behind.

Cobalt is crucial to modern li-ion battery technology despite efforts to reduce its prevalence. But the cobalt supply chain presents numerous challenges for U.S. companies.

As with many other critical minerals, China has established a near-stranglehold on the market, refining an estimated 80 percent of the world’s cobalt chemical products.

Further, most cobalt is mined in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a weak state in which the mining industry has had difficulty keeping children and other laborers from hazardous “artisanal mining” — i.e., mining and washing the ore by hand.

DRC is projected to supply nearly 70 percent of the world’s cobalt for the years to come.

Source: Recycle Your Batteries, Before China Wins That Race, Too – Defense One