Five Eyes will not use Huawei in sensitive networks: senior U.S. official | Reuters

None of the Five Eyes intelligence sharing nations will use technology from Huawei in the “sensitive” parts of their telecoms networks, a senior U.S. official said on Wednesday.

A British security source said earlier on Wednesday that Britain would allow China’s Huawei access to non-core parts of the 5G network, but block it from all core parts of the system.

That puts it at odds with the United States which has told allies not to use the firm, fearing it could be a vehicle for Chinese spy operations.

Source: Five Eyes will not use Huawei in sensitive networks: senior U.S. official – Reuters

Behind Airbnb’s bet on show business to hook travelers | Reuters


Airbnb Inc, the high-flying startup for booking home rentals around the world, has ambitions to develop a slate of original shows to whet customers’ appetite for travel, four people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

The strategy, previously unreported, is crucial for the company, which is privately valued at $31 billion and is gearing up for an initial public offering of stock expected next year.

Airbnb must distinguish itself from Booking.com, Expedia and others in the fiercely competitive and consolidating travel industry, where apartment-renting services are increasingly common.

Source: Exclusive: Behind Airbnb’s bet on show business to hook travelers – Reuters

Supreme Court poised to give Trump victory on census citizenship question | Reuters

null
The U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority on Tuesday appeared poised to hand President Donald Trump a victory on his administration’s plan to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, a move opponents call a Republican effort to deter immigrants from taking part.

Conservative justices signaled during arguments in the closely watched case a willingness to overturn a lower court ruling that blocked the question and appeared untroubled by the administration’s stated justification for using the citizenship question in the decennial population count.

Their liberal counterparts expressed hostility toward allowing the question.

Source: Supreme Court poised to give Trump victory on census citizenship question – Reuters

Explainer: What was Hong Kong’s ‘Occupy’ movement all about? | Reuters


Occupy Central is the name given to the protests that paralyzed parts of Hong Kong for 79 days in late 2014.

Demonstrators demanding that China’s Communist Party leaders allow genuine universal suffrage in the Chinese-ruled city blocked roads in three important districts – Admiralty, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok – drawing more than a million people, organizers estimated.

Source: Explainer: What was Hong Kong’s ‘Occupy’ movement all about? – Reuters

Related>

Gold worth billions is smuggled out of Africa – new analysis


Billions of dollars’ worth of gold is being smuggled out of Africa every year through the United Arab Emirates in the Middle East – a gateway to markets in Europe, the United States and beyond – a Reuters analysis has found.

Customs data shows that the UAE imported $15.1 billion worth of gold from Africa in 2016, more than any other country and up from $1.3 billion in 2006. The total weight was 446 tonnes, in varying degrees of purity – up from 67 tonnes in 2006.

Much of the gold was not recorded in the exports of African states. Five trade economists interviewed by Reuters said this indicates large amounts of gold are leaving Africa with no taxes being paid to the states that produce them.

Source: Gold worth billions is smuggled out of Africa – new analysis

US, Japan say they’ll get to F-35 wreckage first – concerns China will reach crash site dismissed | Ottawa Citizen

null
Top defense officials from the U.S. and Japan say they are confident they’ll reach the wreckage of a F-35 stealth fighter jet before China does, even though there are no indications that country is actively searching for the downed plane.

There has been speculation from various media outlets that either Russia or China would seek to recover the parts of the F-35 to better understand its stealth and other technology.

Source: US, Japan say they’ll get to F-35 wreckage first – concerns China will reach crash site dismissed | Ottawa Citizen

AI-Enabled Cameras That Detect Crime Before it Occurs Will Soon Invade the Physical World | Defense One


The idea of the panopticon has become a stand-in for the threat of ubiquitous surveillance, due, mostly, to Bentham’s choice of setting, a prison. But Bentham’s intent in broaching the idea was not to frighten people. He was proposing a means to manage a scarce resource, the attention of law enforcement.

A new trend in video surveillance technology is turning Bentham’s panopticon into reality, but not in the way Bentham imagined, not in the form of a prison, but rather in a system that makes it possible to focus the attention of law enforcement on any single person’s behavior when that behavior becomes relevant to the guard tower.

Imagine it were possible to recognize not the faces of people who had already committed crimes, but the behaviors indicating a crime that was about to occur?

Source: AI-Enabled Cameras That Detect Crime Before it Occurs Will Soon Invade the Physical World – Defense One

All This ‘Innovation’ Won’t Save the Pentagon | Defense One


For two days, I listened to senior people from the military services, large defense agencies, and major components of the intelligence community as they described various “mission acceleration” efforts—that is, finding shortcuts that allow us to do what we’ve been doing a bit faster, a bit cheaper, a bit better.

This is a problem.

Innovation—from the Latin innovare—literally means to “make new.” But defense and other national security leaders often confuse it with automation or modernization.

Automating an existing process doesn’t change the process itself. Nor does it change the game to incrementally improve the range, speed, or—forgive me—the “lethality” of existing weapons.

Such efforts are like a homeowner fixing a broken window, painting a dilapidated wall, or adding a bathroom without considering the decaying foundations of the house itself.

Source: All This ‘Innovation’ Won’t Save the Pentagon – Defense One

Lockheed, Frustrated with US Air Force, Eyes Foreign F-35 Sales | Defense One


“The frustrating piece for us is the U.S. Air Force,” Lockheed CFO Ken Possenriede said while discussing first-quarter earnings with Wall Street analysts on Tuesday.

“We’ll continue working with our customer and with representatives in the government on what’s the right path forward there.”

In its 2020 budget proposal, Air Force officials said they intend to buy 48 F-35 jets each year through 2024. The budget also requests funding for eight new F-15EX fighters, the first of a planned 80 over the next five years.

Source: Lockheed, Frustrated with US Air Force, Eyes Foreign F-35 Sales – Defense One

What TIC 3.0 means for federal digital transformation | FCW


As agencies pursue digital transformation goals and deploy more cloud-based applications, many federal IT leaders recognize that the Trusted Internet Connection program, launched more than a decade ago to keep federal web traffic secure, can’t keep up.

Today, government traffic runs through an open internet connection and a virtual private network client. It then travels back through the agency data center and a stack of on-prem security devices, and out through the TIC, where it traverses another stack of security appliances to its final destination — sites in the open internet

The challenge is that VPNs expose federal networks to vulnerabilities.

One important note is that virtualizing a physical TIC isn’t the same as providing a cloud-based virtual TIC.

If agencies try to lift and shift (as some in industry advocate), they simply move their challenge from the data center to the cloud and miss the opportunity to improve security and user experience. Virtualizing a physical TIC ultimately makes the problem worse.

Source: What TIC 3.0 means for federal digital transformation — FCW