9 Ways Electrons Can Carry You Across the Water | Design News


With the growing popularity of electric cars, trucks, busses, airplanes, and even motorcycles, it was only a matter of time before electrification hit the waves with everything from electric jet skis to solar and battery powered mega-yachts.

Although at first glance it might seem that electricity and water don’t mix well, electric power actually found its way into marine craft early—submarines from World War I onward until the advent of nuclear-power have been driven by batteries and electric motors when submerged.

At the other end of the size scale, tiny electric trolling motors, powered by simple 12-volt car batteries, have been helping anglers catch “the big one” for decades. Meanwhile, deep sea bathyscaphes and remote and manned undersea vehicles have also counted on battery energy since the early days of the Alvin manned submersible, which was first launched in 1964. In fact, they couldn’t operate without the compact energy that batteries can provide.

Now, with the advent of reliable, high-capacity lithium ion battery systems, a variety of new and exciting water craft are benefitting from electrification.

Some of these new designs are strictly for fun, while others are becoming low-emission workhorses that may point the way to a cleaner maritime industry.

Here we have assembled some examples of what is available now and what will be coming soon …

Source: 9 Ways Electrons Can Carry You Across the Water | Design News

Imagine a World Where the IoT Is Powered By Body Heat | Design News


What if all of the Internet of Things (IoT) devices out there could power themselves using body heat from the people that use them?

Energy harvesting is often discussed as a innovative solution for powering IoT devices. The idea is to generate power from a devices surrounding environment (such as body heat from a person wearing a smartwatch).

However, the fact that the small temperature differential produced between a human body and its surroundings creates very little voltage has posed a real challenge.

That challenge is being tackled directly by Menlo Park, CA–based Matrix Industries. The company, which has been producing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) since 2011, has recently developed a novel circuit capable of harvesting energy at temperature differences less than 1K (roughly -458 degrees Fahrenheit).

Source: Imagine a World Where the IoT Is Powered By Body Heat | Design News

Novel Wearable Sensor Monitors Health Through Sweat Using Nanotech


Sweat is ideal for tracking human health because it contains trace amounts of organic molecules that act as measurable health indicators.

However, many wearable sensors that monitor biological conditions through perspiration have pitfalls, including the easy degradation of enzymes and biomaterials with repeated testing, limited detection range and lack of sensitivity of caused by oxygen deficiency in sweat and poor shelf life of sensors.

Using nanotechnology, a research team from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have developed a next-generation wearable biosensor patch, implanted in a stretchy wristband, that sits on the skin and directs sweat toward special enzyme-coated electrodes to detect very low concentrations of target compounds.

Source: Novel Wearable Sensor Monitors Health Through Sweat Using Nanotech

Microbes Near Volcano Chains Naturally Capture Carbon, Reducing Greenhouse Gas


New research suggests that subsurface microbes are crucial to storing substantial amounts of carbon underground between coastal trenches and inland chains of volcanoes.

Researchers from 27 institutions in six nations led by Rutgers University found that microbes are able to store carbon and keep it from entering the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas by helping to form a mineral comprised of calcium carbonate called calcite.

Source: Microbes Near Volcano Chains Naturally Capture Carbon, Reducing Greenhouse Gas

Capacity Media | Verizon expands 5G to 22 cities, the same number as AT&T


Verizon is to expand its 5G ultra wideband services from two US cities to a total of 22, the company has said, and then go to 30.

The move follows AT&T’s announcement earlier in the month that it would also expand 5G to 22 cities this year – a different 22, though.

Verizon’s service will be available on the 5G Samsung Galaxy S10 phone, the company said yesterday.

Source: Capacity Media

Profit and Online Security: How to Combine for Successful E-Commerce?


According to the statistics, 47.3 percent of internet users made purchases through the Internet in 2018. It is 6 percent more compared with the year 2013. And this figure might grow, as it makes the process of shopping rather convenient. Besides, it’s not time-consuming because people don’t have to spend time on the way to the supermarket or even abroad.

In view of the increasing number of fraudulent schemes on the web, and day-fly sites which disappear after getting money, the security of the deals assumes prominence for clients. Thus, it becomes more and more difficult for e-commerce sites to head above water.

If your range of commodities is diverse and pricing is attractive, but sales leave much to be desired, it’s time to change the situation.

Try to implement the following tips in practice …

Source: Profit and Online Security: How to Combine for Successful E-Commerce?

How Small to Medium Manufacturers Can Compete in the Global Market

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Reshoring is a hot topic in the United States.

Politically charged, the practice promises an increase in jobs for workers, profits for manufacturers and a revival of the ‘Made in the United States’ movement. Small- to medium-sized manufacturers can prepare for a manufacturing resurgence, driven by reshoring and regulatory changes.

Reshoring is the transferring of a business operation that was moved overseas, back to the country it originated in. In this case, United States manufacturers are bringing their services home from other manufacturing economies, such as Asia.

But, what’s driving this change?

Impending regulation by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has mandated a reduction in fuel emissions, in a bid to lessen the environmental impact of ships.

The regulation will be effective January 2020 and is predicted to rapidly drive up demand for higher quality fuels for shipment.

Source: How Small to Medium Manufacturers Can Compete in the Global Market

AI and ML: Should We Be Worried? | EEWeb Community


Just What Dangers Do AI and ML Pose?

This is at the crux of the controversy.

Currently, we have what has been called narrow, or weak AI, which is designed to complete a set of discrete tasks (driving a car, securing a power grid, playing chess, identifying people by facial recognition, etc.).

However, the longer-term goal of many is to develop what is called strong AI that would perform cognitive (thinking, reasoning) tasks.

Imagine, for example, a lethal weapon system that could make decisions about where and when its weapons were to be deployed without any human intervention or control.

Such a system, in the hands of a nation-state, could bring the rest of the world to its knees.

Another danger? Super-intelligent AI will not have human emotions and will therefore not be either benevolent or malevolent by nature.

It will, however, be efficient and take the “shortest path” to achieve a goal, without consideration for what it may destroy in the process.

Source: AI and ML: Should We Be Worried? | EEWeb Community

Semiconductor Equipment Slide Worsens | EE Times


Sales of semiconductor manufacturing equipment continued to slide in March, deepening a sales slump that began late last year with the end of the memory market boom.

The three-month moving average for fab tool sales by North American vendors slipped to $1.83 billion in March, down 1.9% compared to February and down 24.6% compared to March 2018, according to the SEMI trade association.

Source: Semiconductor Equipment Slide Worsens | EE Times

Xilinx to Buy Networking Technology Firm Solarflare | EE Times

Programmable logic supplier Xilinx said that it will acquire networking solutions vendor Solarflare on the same day it reported that its annual sales had exceeded $3 billion for the first time.

Last month at the Open Compute Summit, Xilinx and Solarflare demonstrated their first joint solution — a single-chip FPGA-based 100G SmartNIC, capable of processing 100 million packets per second (receive and transmit) while consuming less than 75 W.

Source: Xilinx to Buy Networking Technology Firm Solarflare | EE Times