The controversy over Disney’s new Aladdin remake, explained | Vox

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Disney’s live-action Aladdin, a remake of its 1992 animated film, has finally arrived in theaters, and on one level, it’s something of an achievement. The production, helmed by Guy Ritchie, had a hefty amount of cultural baggage to overcome, and has been dogged by controversy and skepticism over its premise and execution since before filming even began.

All the backlash isn’t entirely the 2019 film’s fault. Although the original movie was a critically acclaimed masterpiece, it was also dripping in Orientalism and harmful racist depictions of Arab culture.

The new film has, for the most part, managed to shirk much of its inspiration’s exoticism and cultural inaccuracies, but despite Ritchie’s clear efforts to deliver a more respectful version of Aladdin, it may not be enough to satisfy many of its detractors.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations issued a press release earlier this week asking reviewers and critics to acknowledge that the “Aladdin myth is rooted by racism, Orientalism and Islamophobia” and to “address concerns about racial and religious stereotypes perpetuated by the [new] Disney film.”

Source: The controversy over Disney’s new Aladdin remake, explained – Vox

The world’s rivers are contaminated with antibiotics, new study shows | CNN


The world’s rivers are widely contaminated with antibiotics, according to a new global study, the first of its kind. Researchers from the University of York in the UK analyzed samples from rivers in 72 countries and found that antibiotics were present in 65% of them.

Dangerous levels of contamination were most frequently found in Asia and Africa, the team said, with sites in Bangladesh, Kenya, Ghana, Pakistan and Nigeria exceeding safe levels by the greatest degree.

The world’s rivers are widely contaminated with antibiotics, according to a new global study, the first of its kind.

Researchers from the University of York in the UK analyzed samples from rivers in 72 countries and found that antibiotics were present in 65% of them.

Dangerous levels of contamination were most frequently found in Asia and Africa, the team said, with sites in Bangladesh, Kenya, Ghana, Pakistan and Nigeria exceeding safe levels by the greatest degree.

Source: The world’s rivers are contaminated with antibiotics, new study shows – CNN

ECS Federal Wins $276M DHS Cyber Dashboard Task Order | GovCon Wire

ECS Federal won a potential six-year, $276M task order to help the Department of Homeland Security update a dashboard for the Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation program, G2Xchange ETC reported Tuesday.

The report said ECS beat out two contractors for the order DHS competed through the General Services Administration’s Alliant 2 governmentwide acquisition contract vehicle.

Work will involve development, engineering, implementation and operations support for the dashboard, which helps the government determine the cyber posture of agencies.

Source: ECS Federal Wins $276M DHS Cyber Dashboard Task Order – GovCon Wire

The Leading Narratives on War-Crimes Pardons Are Wrong | Defense One

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It is easy to understand why President Trump’s willingness to pardon troops convicted or accused of war crimes is such a divisive issue.

There are two compelling but inconsistent narratives in play. The first is a tale of young people brutalized by war who are only guilty of answering the call to serve.

The second narrative is that any pardon for convicted war criminals threatens the good order and discipline of the military by undermining accountability as well as discouraging whistleblowers.

Source: The Leading Narratives on War-Crimes Pardons Are Wrong – Defense One

Barr’s probe could play right into the Kremlin’s hands | TheHill

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With the Justice Department now instructed by the president to investigate the investigators of Russian intervention in the U.S. elections, an alternative interpretation of Trump campaign “collusion” may emerge.

Far from vindicating the president, it may actually disclose that Moscow’s intelligence services are more devious and that Trump and his advisors are more credulous than many supposed.

Source: Barr’s probe could play right into the Kremlin’s hands | TheHill

Why CIOs need a seat at the top table | FCW


Faster tax return processing… better telehealth services for veterans… saving fuel costs with new air traffic patterns… streamlined command and control for our military.

Think of any mission-critical challenge facing any government organization today, and technology is invariably a part of the solution. Technology — properly applied — has the potential to make massive improvements.

Of course, improperly applied, technology can cause costly and highly visible mistakes. And when that happens, all too often it turns out the agencies’ CIOs were not engaged enough in making mission-critical decisions.

The business leadership saw them in the “just keep the email systems working and lights on” role. Truth be told, some CIOs see themselves in that role, too. And that’s part of the problem.

But just as important are the lost opportunities for making dramatic gains against mission objectives.

The CIOs and their staff and colleagues, including chief technology officers (CTOs) and chief information security officers (CISOs) — are the in-house technology experts.

They are best equipped to understand not only how new technology will work within their organizations, but how to extract the most value to support organizational mission changes around the new technology.

Source: Why CIOs need a seat at the top table — FCW

Air Force wants data platform on classified network this summer | FCW

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The Air Force’s Chief Data Office is moving full force in trying to stand up its data platform on the classified network by the end of the summer.

Sherri Hanson, director of operations for the Air Force’s Chief Data Office, said during a May 23 AFCEA DC event that while the office “still in the process of building that foundation,” the Air Force plans to expand its data platform to the classified Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNET).

The Chief Data Office was founded in the summer of 2017 but received its official mission directive in March. The Open Government Data Act, signed into law in January as part of a larger legislative package, mandates that government and federal agencies have a data office.

“We’re still in the process of building that foundation,” Hanson said.

Source: Air Force wants data platform on classified network this summer — FCW

Grow Green China Inc.

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A view gaining ground in the West holds that China’s determined dominance of a range of low-carbon industries, from more-efficient coal combustion to solar and wind power to electric vehicles, threatens the national security of developed nations and the fortunes of their firms.

That view is outdated, ill-advised, and overdue for a rethink. China’s clean-energy juggernaut—call it Green China Inc.—is growing up.

The West, for its own economic good, should grow up too in its approach to Green China Inc.

Source: Grow Green China Inc.

Five issue positions that could blow up a Democratic campaign


So far this election cycle five issues have arisen that could blow up a Democratic candidate for president, a Democratic candidate for dog-catcher and everyone in between.

The only exceptions are those Democratic candidates who live in Vermont or who live in the 17 congressional districts (approximately 4 percent of the House of Representatives,) that are so solidly Democratic that George Washington reincarnated as a Republican couldn’t win an election.

For everyone else, there are minefields which have already caused some candidates to back off their original positions.

Here are the ones that have come up so far.

Source: Five issue positions that could blow up a Democratic campaign

Bond bulls get a boost as trade tensions fan recession fears | Reuters

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The global bond rally accelerated on Wednesday, sending 10-year U.S Treasury yields to 20-month lows, as investors fearful of the fallout from the Sino-U.S. trade war sold shares and scurried for the safety of German and U.S. government debt.

U.S. 10-year yields are down almost 30 basis points this month, while German yields slipped deeper into negative territory to the lowest in almost three years.

Source: Bond bulls get a boost as trade tensions fan recession fears – Reuters