Here’s Why Autonomous Vehicles Will Need to Be Electrified | Design News

null
When autonomous vehicles reach the market during the next decade, virtually all will have to be electrified to some degree due to potential power budget issues, one expert said in a Design News webinar last week.

Sam Abuelsamid, principal analyst for Navigant Research and co-author of numerous studies on autonomous vehicles, told listeners that the higher-voltage electrical architectures of hybrids and battery-electric vehicles are key to the implementation of autonomy.

Conventional 12V architectures used on most of today’s gasoline-burning vehicles will not be sufficient to support the computing and sensing requirements of autonomous cars, he said.

“We’re already using most of the 2 kW that’s being demanded from today’s features – the heated seats, heated steering wheels, massaging seats, fancy audio systems and all the other goodies we have in our cars,” Abuelsamid said. “So there isn’t really enough margin to add a highly automated system on top of all that.”

Automated vehicles need between 2 and 4 kW of power to drive their on-board sensors, actuators, and computers, he said.

Source: Here’s Why Autonomous Vehicles Will Need to Be Electrified | Design News

Manufacturers Can’t Afford the Cyber Risks They’re Overlooking


Within manufacturing, cybersecurity risk exceeds organizational preparedness. While this readiness gap is a notable issue for the industry now, it’s going to become a much bigger problem moving forward—particularly if sector leaders don’t prioritize a more strategic and preemptive approach to securing their operations from external attacks.

As a recent study by AVANT on the state of tech disruption across various industries revealed, much of the manufacturing industry has failed to take proactive steps to defend against cyber attacks—which is a notable problem considering the growing threats the industry faces.

The study, which surveyed 300 U.S.-based technology decision makers about the evolution of their enterprise tech stack in 2019, found that of the five industries studied—manufacturing, financial services, ecommerce, healthcare/medical and consulting/business services—manufacturing is significantly trailing the other four in terms of adopting next gen security solutions.

Source: Manufacturers Can’t Afford the Cyber Risks They’re Overlooking

Capacity Media | Hyperscale operator capex totals $26bn in 2019

null
New data from Synergy Research Group shows that hyperscale operator capital expenditure (capex) totalled just over $26 billion in Q1 of 2019.

The new figures brings the spend just below a 2% dip compared with the record-setting levels seen throughout 2018.

The 2018 Q1 figures were boosted by Google’s $2.4 billion purchase of Manhattan property, excluding that this purchase, the Q1 capex came in 2% down from the first quarter of 2018.

Source: Capacity Media

Targeting Inflammation to Better Understand Dangerous Blood Clots

null
It’s the third deadliest cardiovascular diagnosis, but doctors are still often stumped to explain why 40 percent of patients experience unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE). And after a patient has dealt with these dangerous blood clots once, a second and subsequent events become much more likely.

New research from a team of University of Michigan scientists may help solve the mystery of how to detect and deal with higher-than-usual clot risk in patients’ veins. The study, done in mice and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, focuses on clots’ relationship to the body’s defense and repair system, which causes inflammation.

“We don’t yet understand the molecular triggers which drive the development of life-threatening clots in deep veins,” said Yogen Kanthi, M.D., the study’s senior author and a vascular cardiologist at U-M’s Frankel Cardiovascular Center.

“Our work aimed to identify and block a previously unrecognized pathway linking inflammation and thrombosis.”

Source: Targeting Inflammation to Better Understand Dangerous Blood Clots

New Organic Flow Battery Brings Decomposing Molecules Back to Life


After years of making progress on an organic aqueous flow battery, Harvard University researchers ran into a problem: the organic anthraquinone molecules that powered their ground-breaking battery were slowly decomposing over time, reducing the long-term usefulness of the battery.

Now, the researchers — led by Michael Aziz, the Gene and Tracy Sykes Professor of Materials and Energy Technologies at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and Roy Gordon, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science — have figured out not only how the molecules decompose, but also how to mitigate and even reverse the decomposition.

The death-defying molecule, named DHAQ in their paper but dubbed the “zombie quinone” in the lab, is among the cheapest to produce at large scale.

Source: New Organic Flow Battery Brings Decomposing Molecules Back to Life

Using Nanoparticles to Remove Micro-Contaminants From Water


There may be a new way to efficiently remove micro-contaminants from water.

Researchers from ETH Zurich have created a new approach to removing chemical substances from water using multiferroic nanoparticles that induce the decomposition of chemical residues in contaminated water.

A variety of chemical substances including cosmetics, medications, contraceptive pills, plant fertilizers and detergents are used daily throughout the world. These everyday items are often difficult to fully remove from wastewater at water treatment plants and ultimately ending up in the environment.

It currently requires an extremely complex process based on ozone, activated carbon or light to remove these critical substances in wastewater treatment plants.

In the new approach, the nanoparticles are not directly involved in the chemical reaction, but rather act as a catalyst to accelerate the conversion of the substances into harmless compounds.

Source: Using Nanoparticles to Remove Micro-Contaminants From Water

SpaceX Successfully Launches 1st Batch of Starlink Satellites | Via Satellite


On Thursday night, SpaceX launched a batch of 60 internet communications satellites from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

More than one hour later, some 270 miles above Earth, the cluster of satellites — part of a system called Starlink — pushed off from the rocket that carried it to orbit.

The individual satellites slowly began to drift toward their singular journeys above the planet.

Source: SpaceX Successfully Launches 1st Batch of Starlink Satellites – Via Satellite –

Viasat Introduces New IFC Antenna System | Via Satellite

Viasat revealed the availability of its new Ka-band Global Aero Terminal (GAT-5518) to provide In-Flight Connectivity (IFC) services on government and business aviation aircraft — from government-focused Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and fixed-wing military platforms to VIP business and corporate jets.

The GAT-5518 is the latest satellite communications (SATCOM) product to join Viasat’s portfolio of Ka-band aero antenna systems.

Source: Viasat Introduces New IFC Antenna System – Via Satellite –

TSMC to Keep Supplying Chips to Huawei | EE Times

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) plans to continue making chips for Huawei even as other companies in the global semiconductor ecosystem are complying with a U.S. ban on supplies to the Chinese electronics company.

At its May 23rd technology symposium, TSMC said that after careful consideration, it will maintain its shipments to Huawei’s chip arm HiSilicon throughout this year. The world’s biggest foundry noted that any impact to one client could result in gains for another client.

Source: TSMC to Keep Supplying Chips to Huawei | EE Times

Q’comm Cites U.S. Security in Appeal | EE Times

Qualcomm said that its position in 5G cellular is vital to U.S. national security in asking a court to stay an injunction against its patent licensing practices. The argument — one of several in its request — threatens to pit the Trump administration against a May 21 decision by a Ninth Circuit Court judge.

In a case brought by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Judge Lucy Koh ruled that Qualcomm’s “no license, no chips” policy and its exclusive licensing deals with smartphone makers were anti-competitive. Qualcomm said that the ruling misinterprets complex antitrust law and would unfairly hurt Qualcomm and the cellular industry.

Source: Q’comm Cites U.S. Security in Appeal | EE Times