Overcoming the Snail’s Pace of Battery Innovation | EE Times


A broader look at a wide range of technologies reveals a very different picture. The technologies that underpin most industries don’t follow the curve of Moore’s Law at all. The sobering fact is many technologies move rather slowly.

But there’s good news: Technological progress can be accelerated greatly by the very technology that does obey Moore’s Law — microprocessors.

Now consider the tiny plastic camera lens that is found in smartphones. Those lenses cost about $.50 to make and they are far from perfect. But they can take excellent pictures thanks to software that compensates for their flaws. Now, anyone with a smartphone can take great pictures.

Something similar is happening in battery technology.

Source: Overcoming the Snail’s Pace of Battery Innovation | EE Times

Capacity Media | Orange picks up just £486m for its last remaining shares in BT


Orange is no longer a shareholder in BT after it sold its last 2.5% for just £486 million, valuing the BT group at only £19.4 billion.

BT itself bought £80 million worth of its own shares from Orange today.

Source: Capacity Media

Engineers, Start Your Drones | Design News

NXP Semiconductors N.V. is calling on engineers to develop new firefighting technology.

The giant semiconductor manufacturer is sponsoring a design contest known as the HoverGames, which challenges engineers to develop a better drone to aid firefighters in battling blazes that can’t be fully understood from the ground.

By providing a drone development kit, a radio, and a sensor package, the company hopes to show the lifesaving power of autonomous drones.

“This isn’t a remote-control drone; it’s completely autonomous,” noted Matthias Wilkens, manager of industry partnerships for NXP. “You program it, it lifts off, flies its mission, and does whatever you’ve programmed it to do.”

Source: Engineers, Start Your Drones | Design News

Edge Gravity Aims for Hyper-Scale | Light Reading


Edge Gravity is close to connecting to 100 content delivery network and service provider partners, but expects to scale much higher as the Ericsson-owned distributed edge cloud unit looks to greatly expand the reach of its platform worldwide.

“We are in hyper-scale mode right now,” Kyle Okamoto, Edge Gravity’s newly appointed CEO, said. “We are all about executing on the mission, on the vision of expanding the edge as far and as wide and as deep as we possibly can with the service providers.”

Source: Edge Gravity Aims for Hyper-Scale | Light Reading

NASA Seeks Wider Use of GPS: Not From Space, but in Space | Via Satellite


NASA, one of the U.S. government agencies that manages GPS, wants to expand the navigation system’s application in a place many probably never thought of using it — space itself.

“We believe [there] will be major benefits for the satellite community during the coming years, based on what we’ve been able to prove out with the Air Force using GPS in the space domain,” James Miller, the deputy director for policy and strategic communications in NASA’s Space Communications and Navigation Program told a session at the annual SATELLITE show in Washington.

Source: NASA Seeks Wider Use of GPS: Not From Space, but in Space – Via Satellite –

Private 5G Networks Expected to Boost Industrial IoT | EE Times


The rollout of 5G technology will have sweeping implications for the industrial IoT but won’t impact all IIoT applications in the near term, according to Gerardo Giaretta, senior director of product management and the head of Industry 4.0 at Qualcomm.

5G will offer enormous benefits in areas like smart factories but won’t immediately be a solution for applications that are relatively simple and require massive-scale deployment, such as smart meters and many farming and agricultural applications, he said in a keynote address at the Sensors Expo & Conference 2019 here Thursday.

Source: Private 5G Networks Expected to Boost Industrial IoT | EE Times

Lots of Spin Left for Hard Drives | EE Times


“There are a lot of people who say the whole world is going to move to flash but, you know, I’m not one of them,” said Jim Handy, principal analyst of Objective Analysis.

“There’s still a very good place for hard drives in what they call ‘cheap and deep’ storage.” And as much as flash has come down in price to be less of a premium media, there’s still a 10-to-1 gap between NAND flash and hard disk drive prices, he noted. “That is not going to go away.”

In the meantime, the line between storage and memory continues to blur as the number of tiers in the storage hierarchy has expanded.

Source: Lots of Spin Left for Hard Drives | EE Times

You Say Your AV Is Safe? Show Me | EE Times


Arguing credibly about the safety of any autonomous vehicle (AV) requires somewhat more proof than a company like Waymo, Uber or GM declaring that its robocars are safe for commercial deployment. The automaker must be able to demonstrate that its AI-driven vehicles meet specific and rigorous standards.

The next questions then become:

  • Which safety standards?
  • Who’s developing the standards?
  • How are vehicles being tested?
  • Who’s going to “assess” the safety of the AVs?
  • Do we trust the assessors?

There are no easy answers.

Source: You Say Your AV Is Safe? Show Me | EE Times

Where Security Meets Privacy in the 21st Century | EE Times


Our technological capabilities are developing faster than are the laws that dictate how they can be used. There are also many gray areas that require a lot of deliberation. With this set of articles we examined the technology and what we can do with it, and consider what we should do with it.

Since time immemorial, humans have been concerned with the subjects of security and privacy, but the convergence of many of today’s technologies — especially in the form of the Internet of things (IoT) — mean that the stakes have never been higher.

Already identity theft and ransomware attacks are rampant, with a worse-case scenario being a dystopian future in which “Big Brother” in the form of governments or mega-corporations observe and control our every move.

Source: Where Security Meets Privacy in the 21st Century | EE Times

U.S. Firms Still Dominate Chip Market Share | EE Times


U.S.-based chip firms held more than 50% of the global IC market share in 2018, by far the most of any region, according to market research firm IC Insights. U.S.-headquartered fabless chip companies accounted for 68% of the global fabless market last year, while U.S. IDMs held 46% of the global IDM share.

South Korean companies — chiefly, memory chip giants Samsung Electronics and SK Hynix — accounted for 27% of the worldwide chip industry market share in 2018, up from 24% in 2017, said the firm.

Source: U.S. Firms Still Dominate Chip Market Share | EE Times