Democratic Congresswomen Urge Trump to Go Back to Russia | The New Yorker

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Four Democratic congresswomen issued a brief statement on Monday urging President Donald Trump to go back to Russia and improve the dire conditions of that country.

In the tersely worded statement, the four lawmakers—Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, of New York; Ilhan Omar, of Minnesota; Ayanna Pressley, of Massachusetts; and Rashida Tlaib, of Michigan—indicated that Russia was “broken and crime-infested” and required Trump’s immediate attention.

Source: Democratic Congresswomen Urge Trump to Go Back to Russia | The New Yorker

July 14, 2019 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

July 14, 2019

1. H.R.1044 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
2. S.386 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
3. H.R.2500 [116th] National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020
4. H.R.1327 [116th] To extend authorization for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund of 2001 through fiscal year 2092, and for other purposes.
5. S.Amdt.906 [116th] S.Amdt. 906 to S.386
6. H.R.1994 [116th] Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019
7. S.1790 [116th] National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020
8. H.R.5428 [115th] Stand with UK against Russia Violations Act
9. H.R.6 [116th] American Dream and Promise Act of 2019
10. H.R.3401 [116th] Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Humanitarian Assistance and Security at the Southern Border Act, 2019

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources – Congress.gov Resources

Securing 5G Networks: Challenges and Recommendations


Fifth-generation (5G) telecommunications networks could revolutionize the digital economy by enabling new applications that depend on ultra-fast communications at industrial scale.

Many of these new applications, such as driverless cars, telemedicine, factory automation, smart electric grids, and smart cities, will capitalize on advances in artificial intelligence (AI), and 5G networks themselves will be AI-enabled.

With these opportunities come major cybersecurity challenges. Western governments are grappling with the risks posed by Huawei and other Chinese vendors of 5G infrastructure equipment.

On May 15, 2019, U.S. President Donald J. Trump issued an executive order laying the groundwork for a ban on Huawei equipment in U.S. networks, a long-anticipated move that was accompanied by the Commerce Department’s even more consequential decision to restrict the company’s access to U.S. components.

Excluding Huawei from U.S. networks, however, is not the same as securing those networks. Instead, U.S. policymakers need to adopt a broader strategy that includes technical measures, regulatory adjustments, a sensible legal liability regime, diplomacy, and investments in research and cybersecurity skills training.

Source: Securing 5G Networks: Challenges and Recommendations

No Refuge: Why Refugees Have Shrinking Options

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A quarter billion people worldwide live outside their country of nationality. Most of them are migrants, people who opt to leave their countries seeking greater opportunity. One-tenth of them, though, are refugees.

They are fleeing political persecution and other acute threats: barrel bombs in Syria, razed villages in Myanmar, or political turmoil, crime, and hyperinflation in Venezuela.

Most refugees go to countries neighboring their own, in part so that they can return home when circumstances change.

Source: No Refuge: Why Refugees Have Shrinking Options

Von der Leyen lays out cards to EU lawmakers ahead of vote | Reuters

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Germany’s Ursula von der Leyen sought on Tuesday to win over skeptical European socialist and liberal lawmakers to back her as European Commission president, laying out ambitious social, climate and migrant policies ahead of a crunch vote.

Source: Von der Leyen lays out cards to EU lawmakers ahead of vote – Reuters

Tech executives head to Capitol Hill for antitrust hearing | Reuters

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The committee is likely to discuss antitrust probes of the four companies under way at the Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission, as well as allegations that the companies seek to thwart nascent competitors.

Democrats, in particular, are expected to press Facebook about a proposed $5 billion settlement between the company and the FTC to resolve allegations that the company violated a 2011 consent agreement by inappropriately sharing information on 87 million users with the now-defunct British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica.

Source: Tech executives head to Capitol Hill for antitrust hearing – Reuters

The Coming AI Metamorphosis | Defense One


Last December, the developers of AlphaZero published their explanation of the process by which the program mastered chess—a process, it turns out, that ignored human chess strategies developed over centuries and classic games from the past.

Having been taught the rules of the game, AlphaZero trained itself entirely by self-play and, in less than 24 hours, became the best chess player in the world—better than grand masters and, until then, the most sophisticated chess-playing computer program in the world.

It did so by playing like neither a grand master nor a preexisting program. It conceived and executed moves that both humans and human-trained machines found counterintuitive, if not simply wrong.

The founder of the company that created AlphaZero called its performance “chess from another dimension” and proof that sophisticated AI “is no longer constrained by the limits of human knowledge.”

Source: The Coming AI Metamorphosis – Defense One

US Could Use Turkish F-35 Parts Contracts to Entice New Customers | Defense One


If the United States ejects Turkey from the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, it would gain new enticements to help sell the stealth fighter jet to other allies.

That’s because contracts for the 900-plus F-35 parts currently made in Turkey could be offered to countries that are considering buying the jet, such as Canada, Finland, Switzerland and Spain. It’s common practice for U.S. arms manufacturers to sweeten export deals by offering potential customers manufacturing and co-production work and even technological know-how.

U.S. officials have long threatened to toss Turkey from the F-35 program if it buys Russia’s S-400 air-defense system.

On Friday, Turkish officials announced that they had begun to take delivery of S-400 parts. Pentagon officials announced, then canceled, Friday press conferences to discuss their response.

Source: US Could Use Turkish F-35 Parts Contracts to Entice New Customers – Defense One

Inside the Pentagon’s Game of Musical Chairs | Defense One

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At 3:04 p.m. on Monday, Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer became the third acting defense secretary since January. That’s when President Trump formally nominated Spencer’s predecessor, three-weeks-on-the-job Mark Esper, to become defense secretary proper.

Spencer’s short walk from one E-Ring office to another belied an immense jump in responsibility, from a service secretary in charge of manning and equipping a pair of service branches to a practitioner of global strategy and the second link in the wartime chain of command. How long will he keep the job? No one knows.

It’s the latest move in a bizarre game of musical chairs playing out at the Pentagon, which now has vacancies at 18 top political positions. And that game could continue well into the summer.

Source: Inside the Pentagon’s Game of Musical Chairs – Defense One

Move over Trump: China’s tweeting diplomats open fresh front in propaganda fight | Reuters


Tweets from Chinese diplomats abroad, including seasoned ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai, have opened a fresh front in Beijing’s increasingly assertive approach to diplomacy and propaganda and may be a sign of things to come.

Source: Move over Trump: China’s tweeting diplomats open fresh front in propaganda fight – Reuters