Airbus Builds SMILE Satellite for ESA | Via Satellite

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Airbus was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to build the European component of the Solar Wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) satellite.

SMILE will be the first joint satellite mission between the ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), following on from the success of the Double Star/Tan Ce mission which flew between 2003 and 2008.

The objective of SMILE is to study and understand space weather.

Specifically, it will look at the physics behind continuous interaction between particles in the solar wind and Earth’s magnetosphere, the magnetic shield that protects the existence of life in our planet.

The mission is now entering a four year period of manufacturing, testing, and integration of the payload module and the platform. In launch configuration these two components will form a 3.15-meter-high stack.

The payload module will be built at the Airbus site in Madrid, where the instruments will be integrated. The platform will be built in Shanghai.

Source: Airbus Builds SMILE Satellite for ESA – Via Satellite –

Semiconductor Market Conditions Deteriorate Further | EE Times


Semiconductor industry revenue is on track to decline further than initially expected this year as a combination of factors, including memory price declines and the U.S.-China trade war, continues to hit the industry harder than originally forecast, according to market research firm Gartner.

Gartner (Stamford, Connecticut) said that it now expects chip sales to fall by nearly 10% to $429 billion this year, which would mark the lowest revenue for the industry since 2017.

The forecast represents a revision from Gartner’s previous forecast, issued last quarter, which called for chip sales to decline by 3.4% this year.

Source: Semiconductor Market Conditions Deteriorate Further | EE Times

No Electronics, No Moon Landing | EE Times

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The Soviets had bigger boosters that could loft larger payloads, but the American emphasis on weight reduction and its emerging electronics sector proved decisive in reaching the moon by the end of the 1960s.

The relatively paltry computing power available to Project Apollo engineers in the 1960s makes their achievement that much more impressive.

As with every aspect of the Apollo designs, weight was the critical factor. The scaling of low-power electronics helped the gigantic Saturn V launch vehicle “make weight” and fulfill the end-of-decade deadline for a manned lunar landing set by President Kennedy.

Source: No Electronics, No Moon Landing | EE Times

Keeping Hackers Out of Connected Cars | Design News

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Without a trusted cyber protection platform, the autonomous vehicle (AV) industry is at risk. Both automakers and consumers will be hesitant to accept AVs if they feel unsafe.

Traditional IT security mechanisms for updates, patches, and protection do not apply to automotive, and the industry is scrambling to catch up with the fast pace of innovation and find a security approach that will prevent attacks, save lives, protect personal data, protect vehicle behavior as designed, and reduce recalls.

In 2019, researchers found that if just 20 percent of AVs were stopped remotely, a city like Manhattan would grind to a complete halt. Even at 10 percent, this could render half of Manhattan’s roads completely inaccessible.

Source: Keeping Hackers Out of Connected Cars | Design News

EVs Are Made Of This- REDUX | Design News


Even if you know how a gasoline engine works, EVs bring a whole new set of components, and a different language to describe them. If you are shopping for an EV, or might be in the near future, it could be helpful to know what the different pieces and systems do in a modern electric vehicle.

Here are eight of the major parts that make up an EV. Reading about them won’t provide you with a degree in electrical engineering, but it might help you understand how this exciting new technology works.

Source: EVs Are Made Of This- REDUX | Design News

American 5G Vendors Getting More Time in the Spotlight | Light Reading

Sweden’s Ericsson, Finland’s Nokia and South Korea’s Samsung continue to supply the bulk of 5G equipment in the US. However, some newer 5G providers such as Gogo and Dish Network are specifically looking for American equipment suppliers for their own 5G buildouts.

“We’ve been partnered with ZTE in the past. We now have an American vendor in that role,” said Oakleigh Thorne, Gogo’s CEO, during the company’s recent quarterly conference call with investors, according to a Seeking Alpha transcript of his remarks.

Source: American 5G Vendors Getting More Time in the Spotlight | Light Reading

Huawei to challenge Android and iOS with own HarmonyOS

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Chinese vendor Huawei has launched its move to make its phones independent of US-originated software.

The company – still faced with a possible ban on using Google’s Android operating system (OS) for new phones, has announced HarmonyOS, which it calls a distributed operating system.

Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business group, said in a presentation in Dongguan today: “We needed an OS that supports all scenarios, that can be used across a broad range of devices and platforms, and that can meet consumer demand for low latency and strong security.”

Source: Huawei to challenge Android and iOS with own HarmonyOS

Synopsys To Buy German Automotive Software Tools Firm | EE Times

Synopsys said it is buying QTronic GmbH, a German provider of simulation and test tools for automotive software and systems development. The EDA vendor said the acquisition will accelerate Synopsys’ delivery of a comprehensive automotive virtual prototyping solution for system and software development throughout the automotive electronic supply chain.

While terms of the deal were not disclosed, Synopsys said subject to customary closing conditions, including foreign regulatory filings, it is expected to close in the company’s fourth quarter of fiscal year 2019.

When completed, it said the acquisition will broaden Synopsys’ automotive product portfolio for automotive Tier 1 and OEM companies and add a team of highly experienced engineers to accelerate technology development and customer deployment.

Source: Synopsys To Buy German Automotive Software Tools Firm | EE Times

In Test, Webb Telescope Electronics Deploy a Mirror | EE Times

nullFinally, some bits of hopeful news about the troubled space telescope, which is supposed to replace the Hubble.

There’s been little good news throughout the tortured development of the over-budget James Webb Space Telescope, an instrument Nature magazine dubbed, “The telescope that ate astronomy.” If and when the Webb telescope is launched, it could end up costing nearly $10 billion.

So, it’s noteworthy that NASA contractor Northrop Grumman reported this week some incremental progress involving the telescope’s electronics. The company said the telescope’s secondary mirror support structure was deployed for the first time using the spacecraft flight electronics. The clean room test demonstrated how the components would work together in orbit.

Source: In Test, Webb Telescope Electronics Deploy a Mirror | EE Times

Is There Math for ‘Drive Cautiously’? | EE Times

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Would highly automated vehicles make driving safer? In principle, the answer is yes. But pitching autonomous vehicles (AVs) as a paragon for an accident-free future?

Wrong.

As Jack Weast, vice president, autonomous vehicle standards, and senior principal engineer at Intel recently told us, “Someday, we’ll get there [accident-free society] … probably when we remove all the human drivers off the road.”

“Driving is an inherently risky activity,” he added. This reality applies to both robotic cars and human drivers. Accidents will happen either in a self-driving car or human-driven car.

Source: Is There Math for ‘Drive Cautiously’? | EE Times