The US Must Prepare for a Cyber ‘Day After’ | Defense One


Stealing personal data is not the worst thing that can happen in cyberspace. For years, the U.S. government has warned that foreign nations have been hacking our critical infrastructure and inserting malware that could sabotage dams, pipelines, water supplies, or even transportation systems. Three years ago, an Iranian state-sponsored hacker was indicted for hacking a dam in New York State.

In its 2019 Worldwide Threat Assessment, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence warned that China has the ability to cause “localized, temporarily disruptive effects” on corporate networks, while Russia “is mapping our critical infrastructure with the long-term goal of being able to cause substantial damage.”

And recent news reports indicate that the U.S. has similarly embedded malware into the Russian power grid, pointing digital missiles back at Moscow.

Source: The US Must Prepare for a Cyber ‘Day After’ – Defense One

China’s Spies Are on the Offensive | Nextgov

null
If Mallory’s story was unique, he’d just be a tragic example of a former intelligence officer gone astray. But in the past year, two other former U.S. intelligence officers pleaded guilty to espionage-related charges involving China.

They are an alarming sign for the U.S. intelligence community, which sees China in the same tier as Russia as America’s top espionage threat.

Source: China’s Spies Are on the Offensive – Nextgov

To build safe streets, we need to address racism in urban design

null
Place-based disparities in pedestrian casualties and gun violence are not unique to the nation’s capital.

Across the nation, street safety is dictated by race, class, and place. The lower a metro area’s median household income, the more dangerous its streets are for people walking. And similar trends persist for gun violence: a small set of high-poverty neighborhoods, typically born out of decades of racial segregation, experience disproportionate clusters of violence that concentrate fatalities among marginalized groups.

Source: To build safe streets, we need to address racism in urban design

Trump, the G7 and the perception of being Putin’s puppet


The G7 summit ended in France with some alarming words from President Trump. Mr. Trump suggested that next year’s summit in the United States should be held at his own resort, the Trump National Doral Miami, and that he “would certainly” invite Vladimir Putin as a special guest to the summit that the Russian dictator was summarily removed from after his illegal annexation of Crimea in 2014.

Some will argue about the policy pros and cons of having Putin in the room, rather than keeping him at arm’s length.

However, the policy debate aside, the optics of inviting Putin to the G7 and hosting the conference at a location that personally lines the president’s pockets is a political disaster.

Source: Trump, the G7 and the perception of being Putin’s puppet

Argentina says to extend maturities of international bonds, IMF debt | Reuters

null
Argentina will negotiate with holders of its sovereign bonds and the International Monetary Fund to extend the maturities of its debt obligations as a way of ensuring the country’s ability to pay, Treasury Minister Hernan Lacunza said on Wednesday.

Interest and principal payments on bonds issued under international and local law will not be altered in the re-profiling. The changes in maturities would be aimed at obligations held by institutional, rather than individual investors, he said.

The peso took a beating during the day, even though the central bank heavily intervened in the foreign exchange market for a second consecutive day.

Source: Argentina says to extend maturities of international bonds, IMF debt – Reuters

Collapse us if you can, government dares Brexit opponents | Reuters


Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government on Thursday challenged opponents of Brexit in parliament to collapse the government or change the law if they wanted to thwart Britain’s exit from the European Union.

In his boldest step since becoming prime minister last month, Johnson enraged opponents of a no-deal Brexit on Wednesday by ordering the suspension of parliament for almost a month.

Source: Collapse us if you can, government dares Brexit opponents – Reuters

Related>

Hikvision, a surveillance powerhouse, walks U.S.-China tightrope | Reuters


For China’s Hikvision, the world’s largest purveyor of video surveillance systems and a vendor to Xinjiang police agencies, a moment of reckoning may be at hand.

Since Aug. 13, Hikvision has not been allowed to sell to U.S. federal government agencies, thanks to a law passed last year that blocked five Chinese firms as possible security threats because their products could allow access to sensitive systems.

That has forced the company – which pulls nearly 30% of its 50 billion yuan ($7.12 billion) in revenue from overseas – onto a tightrope: it must assuage security and human rights concerns in the West without angering the Chinese government, a major customer and an all-powerful regulator.

Source: Hikvision, a surveillance powerhouse, walks U.S.-China tightrope – Reuters

The G7 was the final straw – world leaders’ wives should refuse to travel with their spouses | The Guardian


Unavoidably, when wives down tools to follow their husbands to world summits, it underscores the message that women don’t really have important business of their own.

Sure, ladies, you have a little job and take it as seriously as you like, but when there is politics to be done, your presence, which begins and ends at decorative, is required.

It is a world view that is slightly more textured than an assumption that women are wives first and independent beings second.

There is the whiff of a heteronormative code, too: if the wives aren’t going to do much more than look into the middle distance, their real purpose on the trip is to prove that the husband is a red-blooded fellow. Obviously. Because he has a wife.

The Theresa and Philip May days are a reminder of the final leg of this ideological tripod: that only men belong at these events.

This is why Angela Merkel never takes her husband on trips: people used to say Prof Joachim Sauer was “publicity shy”, or “intensely private”. In fact, the questions that tableaux would have raised – what will the professor do while the ladies are visiting the female football team? – would have undermined Merkel.

If he was out of place, then it followed that she was, too.

Source: The G7 was the final straw – world leaders’ wives should refuse to travel with their spouses | Life and style | The Guardian

Inside Google’s Civil War | Fortune


It was the first time the world had seen such a massive worker protest erupt out of one of the giants of the technology industry—and certainly the first time outsiders got a glimpse at the depth of anger and frustration felt by some Google employees. But inside the Googleplex, the fuel that fed the walkout had been collecting for months.

Tensions had been on the rise as employees clashed with management over allegations of controversial business decisions made in secret, treatment of marginalized groups of employees, and harassment and trolling of workers on the company’s internal platforms. “It’s the U.S. culture war playing out at micro-scale,” says Colin McMillen, an engineer who left the company in February.

To many observers, the tech workforce—notoriously well-paid and pampered with perks—hardly seems in a position to complain.

Source: Inside Google’s Civil War | Fortune

What Would a No-Deal Brexit Look Like? | Council on Foreign Relations


The United Kingdom is preparing for the possibility of leaving the European Union without a plan in place. That would have immediate economic, social, and security repercussions.

Source: What Would a No-Deal Brexit Look Like? | Council on Foreign Relations