5 Tips for Versioning Embedded Systems | Design News


One topic that can be tricky for embedded systems engineers is how to version their embedded system. Every embedded system has two primary systems that need to be versioned, the hardware and the software. While versioning the system sounds simple, it can be confusing on the best way to version the system.

In this post, we will examine five tips for versioning your embedded system.

Source: 5 Tips for Versioning Embedded Systems | Design News

NASA: Hard-Earned Lessons Can Yield Reliability | EE Times


In the aftermath of the fatal Apollo 1 launchpad fire in January 1967 — among the most egregious examples of sacrificing safety and reliability to schedule — NASA learned the hard lessons of the avoidable tragedy, pulled up its socks and built some of the most reliable machines ever devised by engineers.

Among them was the one component of the American lunar landing that lacked redundancy, a design imperative for manned spaceflight: the ascent engine that would lift moon walkers off the lunar surface to rendezvous with the orbiting mother ship, the Apollo command module.

Virtually every component of the Apollo Saturn V and spacecraft had redundant systems, often multiple redundancy. Space is deadly, the engineers and astronauts were always looking for ways to reduce the inevitable risks.

Backup systems were an obvious choice.

Source: NASA: Hard-Earned Lessons Can Yield Reliability | EE Times

US Takes Another Step Toward Ripping Huawei Equipment Out of Country | Light Reading

A group of US representatives introduced legislation this week in the House that would allocate up to $1 billion to pay US telecom operators to rip Huawei equipment out of their networks.

Although it’s by no means a done deal, the prospect of the US government funding the wholesale removal of the Chinese vendor’s equipment from US networks appears to be growing more palpable.

Nokia, Ericsson, Cisco and other big telecom vendors would likely reap the bulk of that spending since they have been deemed a suitable alternative to Chinese vendors like Huawei, which US officials have argued represent a threat to national security.

Source: US Takes Another Step Toward Ripping Huawei Equipment Out of Country | Light Reading

Ericsson Expects $1B US Fine for Corruption, Warns Non-US Investigations May Follow | Light Reading


Ericsson says it expects a US fine of $1 billion for corruption in six countries and that it will take a hit of 12 billion Swedish kronor ($1.23 billion) when it reports third-quarter results to cover the penalty and related costs.

The Swedish vendor said it was facing reputational damage and would not rule out the possibility of further investigations by non-US authorities. “Nothing has started at this point in time … it is a risk factor going forward,” said Börje Ekholm, Ericsson’s CEO, during a call with analyst and reporters this morning.

The update comes almost a year after the Swedish vendor first indicated that a US investigation into corrupt practices could land it with a “material” fine.

At the time, Ekholm told reporters that around 50 employees had been sacked after the company’s own internal investigation found evidence of corruption.

Source: Ericsson Expects $1B US Fine for Corruption, Warns Non-US Investigations May Follow | Light Reading

Dan Whalen, Arris’s Former Top Network Exec, Heads to Adtran | Light Reading

Whalen joins Adtran a little more than four months after he exited CommScope, a few weeks after the company completed its $7.4 billion acquisition of Arris in April.

Whalen, who also held positions at Cisco Systems and Bell Atlantic, brings valuable cable industry experience to Adtran as the vendor looks to deepen its presence with MSOs as they decide how to progress with their next-generation access networks. While many cable operators are expected to continue DOCSIS 3.1 deployments and take a look at DOCSIS 4.0 as those specs are developed, several are deploying FTTP in targeted situations, including greenfield buildouts. One exception is Altice USA, which is largely forgoing HFC network upgrades for an ambitious FTTP deployment.

A portion of Adtran’s cable ambitions took form in early 2018 when the company acquired Sumitomo’s North American EPON business, including its DOCSIS Provisioning of EPON technology that enables cable operators to bridge their DOCSIS backoffice systems to EPON networks. Prior to that, Adtran snapped up CommScope’s EPON and 10G-EPON products, which also had cable implications with respect to targeted FTTP deployments.

Source: Dan Whalen, Arris’s Former Top Network Exec, Heads to Adtran | Light Reading

Telenor to create Nordic cluster after taking control of DNA

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Telenor has won ownership of 94.36% of the shares of Finnish operator DNA and plans to include the company in a new Nordic cluster of its businesses in the region.

That means its operations in Norway – where Telenor is based – as well as Denmark, Finland and Sweden will be run as a single region.

Meanwhile the company has opened Scandinavia’s largest 5G pilot in the Norwegian municipality of Elverum, making Telenor Norway the country’s first operator to integrate 5G into its mobile network.

Source: Telenor to create Nordic cluster after taking control of DNA

Someday We May Make Robots Out Of Smaller Robots | Design News


Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed tiny robots that they say could potentially unlock new locomotion techniques and new ways of developing robots. The results of their research were recently published in the journal Science Robotics.

Called smart active particles (or “smarticles”), the small robots can't do much right now – they just flap their arms. But when these robots are joined in a group they can move as one unit. That unit can then also integrate a sensor to respond to sound or light or be controlled well enough to navigate a maze. And while these robots are pretty simple by any definition, Georgia tech says further research could lead to small robots that can move and change shape in such a way as to provide the building blocks for more complex machines.

“These are very rudimentary robots whose behavior is dominated by mechanics and the laws of physics,” Dan Goldman, a Dunn Family Professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said.

Source: Someday We May Make Robots Out Of Smaller Robots | Design News

Boston Dynamics Is Now Selling its ‘Spot’ Robot | Design News


Boston Dynamics raised a lot of eyebrows earlier this year when it announced it would be making one of its robots commercially available by the end of this year. But this week the company officially announced that its dog-like robot, Spot, is now available for order via the company website.

Spot is a four-legged, animal-like robot that the company is pushing less as a singular-use machine and more as a customizable platform that can be adapted to a range of tasks. The base unit has sensors and cameras allowing for 360-degree vision for navigation (including rough terrain and climbing stairs) and obstacle avoidance. It can move at a speed of 1.6 m/s, carry a payload of up to 14 kg (about 31 lbs), and run for 90 minutes on one charge of its swappable battery. It can be operated via remote control or function autonomously.

Where Boston Dynamics hopes the value for Spot will be found is in its level of customization.

Spot can be customized with the addition of hardware, such as an articulating grabber arm, or with specialized sensors. The company has also released two software development kits (SDKs) along with Spot.

Source: Boston Dynamics Is Now Selling its ‘Spot’ Robot | Design News

What’s next for Industry 4.0? | Electronic Products


The goal to create industrial networks that are fully interoperable, completely secure, and cloud connected while communicating in real time poses some major challenges for Industry 4.0

The widespread push to increase network connectivity, machine productivity, and security for interconnected devices on the factory floor has forced hardware companies to adapt to the increasing advancement toward the industrial internet of things (IIoT), better known as Industry 4.0.

In theory, the ultimate goal of Industry 4.0 is to make networks that are fully interoperable, completely secure, cloud connected, and able to communicate in real time. However, these aims pose some major technology challenges for Industry 4.0 in the near term.

How will Industry 4.0 designers address interoperability, security, and the growing trend for IIoT gateways?

Source: What’s next for Industry 4.0? – Electronic Products

Satellite Manufacturers Enter a Whole New World | Via Satellite


Satellite manufacturers are entering a new world, according to a panel at World Satellite Business Week (WSBW) in Paris last week. Chris Johnson, president, Boeing Satellite Systems International, admitted that that the satellite manufacturing industry stands at the precipice of a number of significant opportunities.

“It has been a challenging market over the last few years. The Geostationary Orbit (GEO) market has not come back. It does not mean it is not critical. Everyone else has shifted towards what might be the future. Everyone has done things in Non-Geostationary Orbit (NGSO). We are starting to build mPOWER for SES. We had a vision. It is really exciting on where we are going to be. The industry have been asking us for standards, flexible. It is a much more challenged environment,” he said.

Source: Satellite Manufacturers Enter a Whole New World – Via Satellite –