We Can’t Secure 5G Networks by Banning Huawei Gear | Defense One


The Trump administration’s approach to fifth-generation wireless networks has been a confused mash-up of trade negotiations, commercial competition, and national security concerns, all epitomized by its focus on barring equipment from Chinese manufacturer Huawei.

Regrettably, this has drowned out any discussion of a larger problem: because of the way 5G works, banning one company’s gear won’t keep our data safe — and nor will even the best cybersecurity practices of today. If America is to harness the promise of 5G in a world of malign online actors, there must be a new relationship between business and government.

5G networks are particularly vulnerable because the network has moved away from centralized, hardware-based switching, to widely distributed software-defined digital routing and small-cell antennas.

Previous networks were hub-and-spoke designs that brought everything to hardware choke points where cyber hygiene could be practiced. In a 5G software-defined network, that activity is pushed outward to a web of digital routers throughout the network.

The absence of chokepoint inspection and control makes 5G cybersecurity exponentially more difficult than on traditional telecommunications networks.

Source: We Can’t Secure 5G Networks by Banning Huawei Gear – Defense One

Democrats face key moment on impeachment drive | TheHill


Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee are poised to vote Thursday to expand their powers to investigate the White House as they try to build public support for impeaching President Trump — a key ingredient if Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is to get on board.

The move is significant because it marks the first time a Democratic panel will vote on language saying explicitly that its investigation could lead to Trump’s impeachment, but it comes amid growing confusion over the Democratic strategy that’s left members bickering about how best to move forward.

Source: Democrats face key moment on impeachment drive | TheHill

‘Why Are You Pissing In Our Face?’: Inside Warren’s War With the Obama Team | POLITICO Magazine


Amid the financial crisis, Warren had become an unlikely star of the left with unambiguous moral outrage and an ability to explain complex financial topics in ways that made them fodder for dinner-table conversation. Improbably, she had turned a largely powerless congressional panel monitoring the bank bailout into a national bully pulpit of populist fury. Her target was not just the big banks but the new Democratic administration, which she suggested had been co-opted by them.

She parlayed her newfound status into a push for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to be part of the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill.

As the legislation was about to pass in June of 2010, Warren met with presidential adviser David Axelrod and was blunt: She wanted Obama to nominate her to run the agency or she could continue probing the Treasury’s every move.

Source: ‘Why Are You Pissing In Our Face?’: Inside Warren’s War With the Obama Team – POLITICO Magazine

What’s in the Judiciary Committee Resolution on Impeachment Procedures | Lawfare


On September 9, the House Judiciary Committee released a draft copy of a “Resolution for Investigative Procedures Offered by Chairman Jerrold Nadler,” which outlines procedures that will apply to “the presentation of information in connection with the Committee’s investigation to determine whether to recommend articles of impeachment with respect to President Donald J. Trump.”

The committee plans to vote on the resolution on Thursday.

What is in the resolution, and what does it mean?

Source: What’s in the Judiciary Committee Resolution on Impeachment Procedures – Lawfare

Qualifying for the debate: The lost role of peer review


The two previous Democratic primary debates had so many contenders that they challenged the patience of even the most loyal political junkies. This week’s Democratic debate will feature half as many: only 10, candidates.

The DNC’s process for narrowing the field has gotten a lot of criticism, mostly from those left out of the debates, but it has been fair, open, and transparent.

Nonetheless, one critique has been missing. Under the current rules, candidates must show a substantial number of donors and a certain amount of public support; what they don’t have to show is that they can do the job for which they are auditioning—president of the United States.

Source: Qualifying for the debate: The lost role of peer review

Russia carries out mass raids on Kremlin critic Navalny’s supporters | Reuters


Russian law enforcement authorities on Thursday carried out mass raids on the homes and offices of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny’s supporters, as part of an investigation into money-laundering.

Searches took place in 39 towns and cities, four days after the ruling United Russia party, which supports President Vladimir Putin, lost a third of its seats in the Moscow city assembly while easily retaining its dominant nationwide position.

Source: Russia carries out mass raids on Kremlin critic Navalny’s supporters – Reuters

The Chief Executive ‘has to serve two masters’ – HK leader Carrie Lam – full transcript | Reuters


This is a transcript of a talk given in late August by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam to a group of businesspeople in the city. The transcript is taken from an audio recording of Lam’s remarks that was obtained by Reuters.

Last week, Reuters published most of Lam’s remarks and is now able to publish them in full.

Source: Exclusive: The Chief Executive ‘has to serve two masters’ – HK leader Carrie Lam – full transcript – Reuters

‘Absolutely not’: PM Johnson denies lying to Queen Elizabeth in Brexit crisis | Reuters


Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Thursday denied lying to Queen Elizabeth over the reasons for suspending the British parliament after a court ruled his decision was unlawful and opponents called for lawmakers to be recalled to discuss Brexit.

Source: ‘Absolutely not’: PM Johnson denies lying to Queen Elizabeth in Brexit crisis – Reuters

Low-cost fracking offers boon to oil producers, headaches for suppliers | Reuters


At a dusty drilling site east of San Antonio, shale producer EOG Resources Inc recently completed its latest well using a new technology developed by a small services firm that promises to slash the cost of each by $200,000.

The technology, called electric fracking and powered by natural gas from EOG’s own wells instead of costly diesel fuel, shows how shale producers keep finding new ways to cut costs in the face of pressures to improve their returns.

Source: Low-cost fracking offers boon to oil producers, headaches for suppliers – Reuters

Govt to give renewables their moment in the sun


In a renewed push to cut India’s dependence on fossil fuels, the central government wants state-run companies to build massive clean energy parks at a cost of around $2 billion each, with built-in incentives to ensure states and operators are invested in the success of the parks.

The proposed ultra mega renewable energy power parks (UMREPP) of 2,000 megawatts (MW) each will help developers achieve economies of scale and further bring down solar and wind power tariffs.

Source: Govt to give renewables their moment in the sun