The Top 5 Causes for Project Fatigue | Design News


Project fatigue can have a crippling effect on the project development cycle. A project starts and the development team is energized and dive in with positive fervor, but before long, the project stalls and seems to be going nowhere fast. There are dozens of potential causes for project fatigue, but in my experience, there are five main causes that result in project fatigue for developers. Let’s examine these causes.

One of the leading causes for project fatigue are projects that turn out to have complex and never-ending debugging cycles.

There is nothing like working on a project where every line of code seems to generate a bug that a developer has to fight through. Debugging takes a mental toll on developers and as more and more time is spent debugging, developers lose their motivation and ability to quickly solve problems.

Source: The Top 5 Causes for Project Fatigue | Design News

5G buildout will be more involved than we’ve been led to believe | EDN

null
From the moment that the wireless industry decided it would make use of higher frequencies for 5G transmission, everyone has known spectrum would have some ramifications for those deployment plans. One issue, it turns out, will probably not be that big of a deal, the other somewhat more consequential, but neither is addressed very often.

Both derive from what’s commonly known: the higher the frequency of a wireless signal, the less well it propagates and the less able it is to penetrate obstacles. So as a practical matter:

  1. In contrast to deploying 3G and 4G, deploying 5G will require distinct indoor and outdoor strategies.
  2. 5G base stations will have to be spaced more closely, necessitating more of them, especially in densely populated areas.

Source: 5G buildout will be more involved than we’ve been led to believe | EDN

mmWave and OFDM: Is PHY research dead? | EDN


Marketers worldwide are hyping the idea that 5G networks will be deployed in 2019. Indeed, I’m guilty of contributing to this impression.

When we examine the true definition of millimeter-wave (mmWave) technology, we discover that signals don’t have millimeter wavelengths until they reach 30 GHz. So, let’s take a closer look at what is going on in the industry for true mmWave communications.

With the exception of a few trials conducted by AT&T at 39 GHz, the currently deployed 5G technology is centered around the 28 GHz band—not quite 30 GHz, but close enough.

When we take a step back from the marketing engine surrounding 5G and look at mmWave technology up close, we recognize that true mmWave commercial communication deployments are still on the way. Plus, numerous challenges and opportunities to fully utilize mmWave spectrum remain.

Source: mmWave and OFDM: Is PHY research dead? | EDN

Corning’s Fiber Business Is Cratering, but What Does That Mean for 5G? | Light Reading

Corning, a major global supplier of fiber, earlier this week lowered its revenue expectations from the sale of fiber cabling to telecom service providers and enterprises.

It marked the company’s third consecutive reduction in guidance for fiber revenues over the past few months. And this slowdown in fiber spending, which also includes fiber used in cable HFC (hybrid fiber coax) networks, is raising concerns about the implications for 5G.

Fiber cabling is at the heart of just about every part of the nation’s telecommunications network. Whether its for WiFi, 4G or DSL, most of the Internet traffic around the world eventually makes its way onto a fiber cable — and Corning makes a substantial amount of those cables.

Source: Corning’s Fiber Business Is Cratering, but What Does That Mean for 5G? | Light Reading

Here Comes the Tech Future for Design and Manufacturing | Design News


At the Siemens Media and Analyst Conference in Brooklyn earlier this month, Tony Hemmelgarn, CEO and president of Siemens Digital Industries Software (previously Siemens PLM), sat down to answer questions about new technology for design and manufacturing.

Much of the conversation involved finding the balance between getting ahead of customers with technology and – on the other hand – keeping up with the customer’s leap into new tech.

One of the challenges in responding to customer demand, is sometimes we’ve found we were falling behind. When we see that, we start to move ahead. Sometimes the market starts to push. At the beginning of additive manufacturing, we were a bit behind.

Source: Here Comes the Tech Future for Design and Manufacturing | Design News

Humans Will Kill You at the Edge | Light Reading

Edge Computing Congress 2019 — Damn those infernal employees, gobbling up cash and demanding benefits. Telcos making investments in new “edge” facilities will have to “minimize the need for a human presence” if they are to have any chance of making a profit, according to Alex Reznik, who leads the edge group for the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, one of the main standards bodies in edge computing.

Automation done badly could destroy the business case for edge computing, Reznik told attendees at this week’s Edge Computing Congress in London.

“If you don’t get automation right it will kill you. This is anything but a usual cloud,” he said.

Source: Humans Will Kill You at the Edge | Light Reading

Comcast’s Trojan Horse for Pay-TV | Light Reading


Comcast this week announced it is offering Xfinity Flex, its streaming video and smart home combo product, for free to broadband-only customers.

Comcast introduced Flex in May, but the new thing here is that the company clipped the original $5 per month add-on fee that caused much eye-rolling, teeth-gnashing and fist-clenching a few months ago.

How dare they charge extra just for a set-top box (a.k.a. cable’s blight upon the universe)! This’ll never work!

Source: Comcast’s Trojan Horse for Pay-TV | Light Reading

Iridium Awarded $738.5 Million US DoD Contract | Via Satellite


Iridium Communications was awarded a $738.5 million, seven-year, fixed-price contract with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) through the U.S. Air Force Space Command (AFSpC) to provide unlimited satellite services from its Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) constellation.

Through what is known as the AFSpC’s Enhanced Mobile Satellite Services (EMSS) program, Iridium will continue to deliver access to global  voice, broadcast, netted, or Distributed Tactical Communications System (DTCS) and select other services for an unlimited number of DoD and associated DoD-approved subscribers.

Source: Iridium Awarded $738.5 Million US DoD Contract – Via Satellite –

Constellations Combined: Iridium and OneWeb Join Forces on New LEO Service | Via Satellite


Iridium and OneWeb entered into an MoU to develop a combined service offering from Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) that could potentially include ground equipment that is compatible with both operators’ constellations, the companies confirmed at Iridium’s annual partner conference.

The unique service would combine Iridium’s Certus L-band service with OneWeb’s Ku-band service for what is being described as a, “complementary, full-service option for applications such as heads of state comms, critical tactical services, maritime, disaster response and more.”

Iridium spokesperson Jordan Hassin told Via Satellite that the MoU with OneWeb is still in the early stages, so no timelines on service launch have been established.

Source: Constellations Combined: Iridium and OneWeb Join Forces on New LEO Service – Via Satellite –

With EUV, Timing is Everything | EE Times


The process of developing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography has been long and difficult, drawing on a wide array of technical disciplines and placing tremendous demands on people and organizations all along the semiconductor supply chain.

Today, after decades of dedicated effort, the technology they have created can be used in a production environment. But just because a technology is available for adoption does not necessarily mean it should be adopted.

At this point in EUV’s development, it’s worth taking a step back and considering (in light of increasing hands-on production experience) what the high-level chipmaking process would look like going forward, with and without EUV’s new patterning capabilities.

Source: With EUV, Timing is Everything | EE Times