September 22, 2019 – Most-Viewed Bills | Congress.gov

September 22, 2019

1. H.R.1044 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
2. S.386 [116th] Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019
3. H.R.3289 [116th] Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019
4. S.Amdt.939 [116th] S.Amdt.939 to H.R.1044
5. H.R.8 [116th] Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2019
6. S.1838 [116th] Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019
7. S.1790 [116th] National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020
8. H.R.2500 [116th] National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020
9. H.R.5 [116th] Equality Act
10. H.R.1423 [116th] FAIR Act

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources – Congress.gov Resources

UN Climate Action Summit 2019: why it was a disappointment | Vox


The largest greenhouse gas emitters in the world — China, the United States, and India — offered either nothing or very little about their commitments to curb emissions on Monday at the United Nations Climate Action Summit, a gathering explicitly convened to push countries to do more to fight climate change.

“What we’ve seen so far is not the kind of leadership we need from the major economies,” said Helen Mountford, vice president for climate and economics at the World Resources Institute, during a call with reporters.

Source: UN Climate Action Summit 2019: why it was a disappointment – Vox

America Is Abandoning the International Systems that Made It Great | Defense One


Shortly after signing the Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Franklin, a Founder of the republic and America’s first diplomat, famously told his fellow revolutionaries: “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.”

This week, leaders and diplomats, activists and CEOs from around the world will gather in New York for the annual UN General Assembly.

From the halls of the United Nations to the hotels of Midtown Manhattan, the issues on everyone’s lips will be climate change, the trade war, tensions in the Gulf, or any of the world’s conflicts and humanitarian crises.

But the question on everyone’s mind will be whether the multilateral system that’s supposed to address these challenges (albeit often imperfectly) has itself become a dead man walking.

This fear has prompted a desperate attempt by a group of countries led by Germany and France to revive the spirit and practice of international cooperation by launching the Alliance for Multilateralism on September 26. Almost certain to be conspicuously absent (and the implicit reason for this initiative): the United States of America.

The very government that on its own soil founded and largely sustained the multilateral world we have known since 1945 has effectively abandoned it.

Source: America Is Abandoning the International Systems that Made It Great – Defense One

WHIP LIST: The 187 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry | TheHill


More than three-quarters of the House Democratic caucus is now calling for the beginning of an impeachment inquiry for President Trump.

While Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) for months resisted calling for an inquiry, in part from worries that doing so could imperil Democrats who won swing districts in 2018, she announced Sept. 24 that she supports a formal impeachment inquiry.

“The President must be held accountable. No one is above the law,” she said.

Source: WHIP LIST: The 187 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry | TheHill

Revealed: how TikTok censors videos that do not please Beijing | The Guardian


TikTok, the popular Chinese-owned social network, instructs its moderators to censor videos that mention Tiananmen Square, Tibetan independence, or the banned religious group Falun Gong, according to leaked documents detailing the site’s moderation guidelines.

The documents, revealed by the Guardian for the first time, lay out how ByteDance, the Beijing-headquartered technology company that owns TikTok, is advancing Chinese foreign policy aims abroad through the app.

Source: Revealed: how TikTok censors videos that do not please Beijing | Technology | The Guardian

The Remarkable Rise—and Epic Fall—of WeWork’s Charismatic, Controversial Founder Adam Neumann | Fortune


As WeWork prepared to go public earlier this year, the office provider and its attorneys at Skadden, Arps, Meagher & Flom set about drafting the company’s S-1 prospectus. Replete with notions of energy and entrepreneurial spirit—and a mission to “elevate the world’s consciousness”—the document reflected the lofty ambitions that helped co-founder and CEO Adam Neumann build a company valued at an astonishing $47 billion.

But the S-1 also contained details that raised eyebrows among WeWork’s underwriters, JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs, such as a corporate governance structure that granted Neumann outsized control over WeWork’s voting shares.

It disclosed financial arrangements that saw outside entities owned by Neumann directly profit from WeWork’s operations.

And it specified how Neumann’s wife, WeWork co-founder Rebekah Neumann, would play a hugely influential role in choosing her husband’s successor via a two- or three-person selection committee.

Source: The Remarkable Rise—and Epic Fall—of WeWork’s Charismatic, Controversial Founder Adam Neumann | Fortune

Most Powerful Women in Politics 2019: Pelosi, Warren, AOC and More | Fortune


In a Washington where more women than ever before are serving in Congress—and running for the nation’s highest office—identifying the 25 most powerful is a Herculean task.

After all, in the world of politics, power can take many forms: the power to command votes, to shape the national agenda, to stoke or deflate the economy, to become a king—or should we say—queenmaker. So our 2019 list includes elected officials, appointees, influencers, and money movers (and, we admit, a little fuzzy math). But no matter the role, we weighed the same factors: the power granted by her position, her influence on policy and political conversation, and the trajectory of her career.

The result: names you see in the headlines daily—and a few you might be reading for the first time.

Source: Most Powerful Women in Politics 2019: Pelosi, Warren, AOC and More | Fortune

Be careful what you wish for: Impeachment inquiry poses risks for 2020 Democrats | Reuters


The crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates were nearly unanimous in praising House Democrats’ decision to begin an impeachment inquiry into Republican President Donald Trump over accusations he sought foreign help to smear a political rival.

Now comes the hard part.

With impeachment set to overshadow the Democratic presidential primary race, how will candidates draw attention to their key policy issues, ranging from universal healthcare to income inequality?

Source: Be careful what you wish for: Impeachment inquiry poses risks for 2020 Democrats – Reuters

Patriot Games: President Trump Again Puts the “Nation” in United Nations | Council on Foreign Relations


In his third annual speech to the UN General Assembly, President Donald J. Trump reinforced the central theme of his first two appearances: The road to international peace and prosperity requires collaboration among fiercely independent, sovereign nations that are vigilant in pursuing their national interests and determined to combat the siren songs of “globalism” and “socialism.”

The president trumpeted the spirit of “national renewal” he had launched at home, and he encouraged peoples of all nations to embrace their own forms patriotism, by cherishing their unique histories, cultures, and destinies. At the same time, he offered zero guidance about how multilateral cooperation could actually emerge from these competing nationalisms. Nor did he explain why any other UN member states would want to follow the U.S. lead on Iran, given his own administration’s repeated defection from major international initiatives over the past three years.

In contrast to his earlier, bombastic appearances before the United Nations, Trump’s tone was solemn, even-keeled, even reassuring.

Source: Patriot Games: President Trump Again Puts the “Nation” in United Nations | Council on Foreign Relations

Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate


The IPCC approved and accepted Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate at its 51st Session held on 20 – 23 September 2019. The approved Summary for Policymakers (SPM) was presented at a press conference on 25 September 2019.

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Source: Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate — Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate