Pew Survey Finds Most Americans Know Little About Privacy, Social Media, and Cybersecurity | Fortune


Although more dependent on technology than ever before, Americans don’t generally understand critical tech topics like privacy policies, two-factor authentication, or which social media apps Facebook owns.

The insights come from a survey published Wednesday by Pew Research Center, which quizzed nearly 4,300 U.S. adults about their tech IQs. The results showed that Americans were able to correctly answer multiple choice questions about phishing scams and website cookies but struggled with topics like private browsing and specifics about Facebook and Twitter.

Source: Pew Survey Finds Most Americans Know Little About Privacy, Social Media, and Cybersecurity | Fortune

Why Open Skies Is An Old Fashioned Treaty Worth Keeping | Defense One


Both Republican and Democratic lawmakers have expressed alarm about reports that the Trump administration may abandon the Open Skies Treaty.

Put into effect in 2002, it allows the United States, Russia, and 32 other countries to conduct short-notice flights over one another’s territories to monitor military deployments. The pact’s defenders point out that helps NATO allies monitor Russian moves — even as technical limitations prevent Russia from making much use of the imagery for purposes of espionage. That’s part of why the treaty is worth keeping.

Rep. Eliot Engel, D-New York, chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, quickly voiced his concerns.

“American withdrawal would only benefit Russia and be harmful to our allies’ and partners’ national security interests,” Engel said in a Monday letter to National Security Advisor Robert C. O’Brien.

Source: Why Open Skies Is An Old Fashioned Treaty Worth Keeping – Defense One

As Assault Begins, Trump Vows to Make Turkey Keep Its Word While Lawmakers Vow Punishment | Defense One


Just hours after Erdogan launched airstrikes on Syrian Democratic Forces targets on the Syria-Turkey border, Trump said in a statement that the United States would “hold” Turkey to commitments to protect civilians and religious minorities and to “ensure no humanitarian crisis takes place.” Turkey, he said, is now “responsible” for ensuring ISIS fighters detained in SDF prisons are not allowed to escape, and for preventing a resurgence of the terror group.

“We expect Turkey to abide by all of its commitments, and we continue to monitor the situation closely,” Trump said. On Monday, Trump promised on Twitter to “obliterate” Turkey’s economy if Ankara “does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits.”

Source: As Assault Begins, Trump Vows to Make Turkey Keep Its Word While Lawmakers Vow Punishment – Defense One

Trump’s all-out blockade threatens Democrats’ impeachment drive | POLITICO


President Donald Trump has set his strategy for the impeachment fight with House Democrats — minimum cooperation, maximum confrontation. Whether Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats have learned how to counter him is the big question.

Trump dramatically upped the political ante on Tuesday, with White House counsel Pat Cipollone blasting the Democrasts’ impeachment inquiry as “illegal” and “dangerous,” and insisting the administration won’t cooperate with a probe it considers constitutionally improper.

Source: Trump’s all-out blockade threatens Democrats’ impeachment drive – POLITICO

Congress set for showdown with Trump over Kurds | TheHill


The announcement, which caught leadership and traditional GOP allies flatfooted, sparked a wave of condemnation, with Republicans calling it a “disaster in the making,” a “catastrophic mistake” and a “terrible decision.”

Lawmakers are already weighing how to respond to Trump’s decision, setting the stage for a high-profile clash with Trump as soon as Congress returns from a two-week break on Monday.

Source: Congress set for showdown with Trump over Kurds | TheHill

The ‘power pose’ may be overrated, but civil discourse is essential | FCW


This posture distinction hit the big time after research by Amy Cuddy and her colleagues at Harvard Business School. Cuddy coined the phrase “power pose” to describe the expansive, confident stance. A 2012 TED talk by Cuddy on the power pose, with 50 million views to date, is the second-most downloaded TED talk ever. One of my daughters tells me that she has practiced the power pose before going into job interviews, and she is clearly not alone.

A recent NextGov post, however, presents academic literature suggesting that the benefits of the power pose are a myth.

Source: The ‘power pose’ may be overrated, but civil discourse is essential — FCW

Federal HR designed for stability not agility | FCW


The federal hiring process doesn’t match the changing nature of agency work, according to Margaret Weichert, who until recently served as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management.

Weichert, who is deputy director of management at the Office of Management and Budget, told attendees at an Oct. 9 GovExec event that government needs to rethink its hiring model to draw potential applicants who may not fit the typical mold of a federal worker.

“Our human capital structure is not designed to be agile, it’s designed to be stable,” Weichert said.

Source: Weichert: Federal HR designed for stability not agility — FCW

NSA official: ‘Dumb’ software supply chain attacks still prevalent | FCW


While much of the discussion around supply chain security has focused on the parts, components and gear that make up an organization’s physical IT assets, a growing number of experts are making the case that vulnerabilities in the software supply chain may represent the larger cybersecurity threat over the long haul.

A 2018 survey of 1,300 IT security professionals by cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike found that nearly 80% of respondents said their organizations needed to devote more resources to their software supply chain, and 62% said the issue was being overlooked during IT spending decisions.

That lack of attention may be creating easy pathways for malicious hackers. According to Cheri Caddy, director of public private partnerships at the National Security Agency, rudimentary, easily exploitable software vulnerabilities are still the most common ways bad actors get into systems and networks.

Source: NSA official: ‘Dumb’ software supply chain attacks still prevalent — FCW

Why are millennials unfazed by the national debt?


.. while young Americans are increasingly concerned about college loan debt they feel personally, few are stirred to demand action to tackle the national debt, with its climate change-like threat to our economic and social future.

Why is this?

At Brookings, we are trying to understand why young people react so differently to climate change and the national debt, even though both will affect them profoundly and both require urgent steps now to forestall serious damage in the future. Thanks to interesting work by a range of organizations, such as the Pew Research Center, the FrameWorks Institute, and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication, it may be possible to glean some clues from climate change about ways to communicate with younger people about the fiscal problem

This generation of younger people also tends to look for ways to take action themselves, even when there are costs involved; they are less inclined to rely only on action by government and corporations.

Source: Why are millennials unfazed by the national debt?

Navigating the complex politics of impeachment


As Congress weighs impeaching President Donald Trump, key players are taking different approaches to leadership. The politics of impeachment is complex.

Regardless of the lofty rhetoric that some officials offer about it, every person involved is looking out for their political well-being.

How Congressional Democrats, Congressional Republicans, and President Trump each approach the current battle will have effects on the fight itself and on their own political standing.

Source: Navigating the complex politics of impeachment