US 5G Networks Marked by Paltry Coverage, Unimpressive Speeds, Independent Tests Show | Light Reading


IHS Markit’s RootMetrics today released what are the first big, public, comprehensive and independent tests of 5G networks in the US by a major wireless network testing company. The results reinforce the fact that it’s still early days for 5G in the US, and that 5G coverage and performance is uneven — to put it mildly.

RootMetrics — which is not owned by Informa, Light Reading’s parent company — tested 5G networks from all the major wireless networks operators in Atlanta, Chicago and Dallas.

Source: US 5G Networks Marked by Paltry Coverage, Unimpressive Speeds, Independent Tests Show | Light Reading

Huawei Brushes Aside US Blacklist as It Boosts Sales 24% | Light Reading

If the US ban on component supply is harming Huawei, it isn’t showing up in its results.

The vendor in Washington’s crosshairs has cruised to another comfortable profit, supporting claims that its supply chain has not been affected by the blacklisting.

It has posted a notional net profit of 53.14 billion Chinese yuan ($7.52 billion) for the first three quarters of 2019 on revenues of RMB610.8 billion ($86.0 billion).

The result covers the first full quarter following Huawei’s addition to the US entity list, which bans US firms from exporting to the Chinese vendor.

If anything, growth appears to have accelerated this year.

Source: Huawei Brushes Aside US Blacklist as It Boosts Sales 24% | Light Reading

November 2019 – The Growing Risk of a Major Satellite Cyber Attack | Via Satellite


Last year at CyberSat, David DeWalt, CEO of Momentum Cyber and all-around cyber influencer, said one of the sectors he was most worried about when it came to a high-profile cyber-attack was satellite. It made for sobering listening.

James Turgal, managing director, Cyber Risk Services at Deloitte and Touche agreed with this assessment. He says, “Dave is correct about his fears of seeing a major cyber incident, whether that presents itself as an intrusion into the satellite itself or a breach into and collection of data transmitted from the satellite.”

In terms of what he sees as the particular vulnerabilities in satellite networks, Turgal adds that the main areas of concern have to be the human factor and the supply chain. He said there is no question that cyber vulnerabilities exist and are exploited because of the human factor.

“Cyber risk and cybersecurity is more about people behind keyboards than it is about technology. The human factor; either someone engaging in an activity (witting or unwitting) on behalf of a cyber threat actor. Or, the omission of action (intentional or unintentional) such as patching, misconfiguration of systems; all of these factors can allow a gap to form which can be exploited by a threat actor,” he says.

Source: November 2019 – The Growing Risk of a Major Satellite Cyber Attack | Via Satellite

This Is How Americans Feel About Manufacturing in 2019 | Design News

How do Americans feel about the manufacturing sector?

A new survey from product sourcing, supplier selection, and marketing solutions company Thomas polled participants from across the US to take a temperature on how Americans feel about manufacturing both from an economic standpoint and as a viable career option.

Sixty-two percent of respondents prefer to buy American-made products, for example. Only 46 percent of respondents view the increased number of tariffs on foreign-made goods as disruptive to the American economy. Most encouraging, 95% of all respondents said they believe manufacturing is important to the US economy.

The majority of those survyed also look at manufacturing as a good career choice.

“Since the skills gap is one of the biggest issues the industry is facing, it’s good to see that 60 percent of survey respondents would likely encourage someone entering the workforce to pursue a career in manufacturing, said Tony Uphoff, president and CEO of Thomas, said.

“In reality, there has never been a more exciting time for industry as output is at an all-time high and job growth continues to rise.”

Source: This Is How Americans Feel About Manufacturing in 2019 | Design News

5G, IoT and AI –Three Pillars for the Next Wave of Innovation | EEWeb Community

The complexities associated with pervasive connectivity have driven the industry to take a close look at how to increase the speed at which data can be processed, and focus on improving the connectivity between processors, memory and the other parts of the system.

Memory technologies like GDDR, which were once confined to graphics cards and game consoles, are increasingly being looked at and adopted in data intensive applications like AI and networking. The latest member of the GDDR family, GDDR6, increases data rates to 16 Gb/s, enabling a single GDDR6 DRAM to transfer data at a speed of 64GB/s. Another benefit is reduced power consumption by dropping the voltage from 1.5V to 1.3V.

High bandwidth memory (HBM) is a relatively new type of memory that uses advanced stacking technology to achieve better performance and power-efficiency than GDDR memory. Using a large number (1024) of low-speed connections,(2Gb/s), HBM2 DRAMs are able to transfer data at a speed of 256GB/s, 4 times faster than GDDR6 DRAMs can. But system designs are more complicated and costly, due in part to the newness of the technology.

Moving data from endpoints to computer systems where it can be processed is also a growing problem.

High-speed serial links, also called SerDes interconnects, help move data between chips and systems, and are critical to networking infrastructure. Serial links have been improving in performance and power-efficiency as well, with 28Gbps and 56Gbps implementations being deployed today, and industry work underway in 112Gbps implementations for the future.

Source: 5G, IoT and AI –Three Pillars for the Next Wave of Innovation | EEWeb Community

Why Hardware Security is the Preferred Choice for IIoT | EE Times


Industrial automation will be one of the biggest areas of spending on the internet of things (IoT) in 2019. So, how can the devices connecting the systems to the network be trusted, and what’s the best way to ensure that their industrial IoT (IIoT) systems are secure: software or hardware? In this article, we look at the case for hardware-based security as the preferred choice for IIoT and its benefits beyond just security — such as time to market, scalability, and performance and manufacturing flexibility.

Hardware spending will be about $250 billion, led by more than $200 billion in module/sensor purchases. Given this growth, the potential risk from cyberattacks will also increase significantly. System developers will be looking to rapidly deploy security technology, with both hardware and software solutions available on the market.

A key factor determining which route to go is essentially around vulnerability.

Software is arguably much more vulnerable because it can more easily be analyzed by attackers to undermine security.

On the other hand, hardware security chips are more likely to be tamper-resistant and have additional features that can efficiently prevent attacks. This includes protected processing and storage of software, code, and data — enabled through encrypted memory and processing, fault and manipulation detection, and secure code and data storage.

Hence, the software running on the secured hardware can also then be protected from reading, copying, and cloning and from being analyzed, understood, and sabotaged.

Source: Why Hardware Security is the Preferred Choice for IIoT | EE Times

Fines: Big Government’s Stealth Tax on Big Tech | EE Times


Big U.S. tech companies face a stealth tax around the globe because they are too successful.

Richly successful technology companies are highly visible to governments around the world as hugely profitable entities, providing revenues to the state. Surely, they must pay more. A public relations campaign that informs the citizens of how technology companies have shortchanged us is underway — injuring us all. After all, any company that provides their customers with free services and is so profitable must be harmful to the population, right?

This theory provides the backdrop to the current Attorneys General of forty-eight U.S. states in announcing a broad investigation into Facebook, Google, and possibly Amazon, etc.

The old saying is to sue those who have “deep pockets.” These companies are ideal targets. They have extraordinarily high gross margins and correspondingly meager expenses while growing profits at a strong pace.

Plus, the engineering types who run these companies have concentrated on their customers and products, rather than on the wily political minds of state capitals.

Source: Fines: Big Government’s Stealth Tax on Big Tech | EE Times

Chickens & Eggs Frustrate Operators’ Quest for 5G Revenues | Light Reading


Wall Street analysts at MoffettNathanson released a chart this week that gets straight to the heart of the 5G push. Citing data from CTIA, the main trade association for the US wireless industry, the chart shows dramatic increases in traffic across wireless networks but a slight decline in the money that wireless network operators are getting from their customers for carrying that traffic.

While operators like Verizon and policymakers like FCC Chairman Ajit Pai promise that 5G will usher in a revolutionary new age of connectivity, the coarser truth is that it’s also a chance for telecom players around the world to boost sales, revenues and, potentially, profits.

While none of this is a secret, or a surprise, there is one big mystery that still remains: How exactly are 5G providers going to make money on this thing?

Source: Chickens & Eggs Frustrate Operators’ Quest for 5G Revenues | Light Reading

Former Statoil CIO: Energy Industry Needs Digital Strategy Overhaul | Via Satellite


According to the former CIO and Digital Strategy Lead for one of the world’s largest multinational energy companies, digital transformation represents both the top opportunity and business risk for the oil and gas industry in 2020. Why the double-edged sword? Trond Ellefsen, CEO of Invatare and formerly of Statoil (now Equinor), explains that the risk comes from energy executives’ lack of any clear vision on digital transformation strategies.

“The oil and gas industry’s corporate-wide business architecture has evolved, for the most, by coincidence,” Ellefsen told attendees at the October OilComm conference in Houston, Texas.

“Current investments in digital technologies, such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), data analytics, and machine-learning do not seem to be delivering as expected. Projects are not gaining traction, not generating the expected ROI, and not on schedule. Teamwork is not improving.  Many companies are doing smart things pointed at small challenges inside existing siloes without considering the value hidden across the value-chain.”

Source: Former Statoil CIO: Energy Industry Needs Digital Strategy Overhaul – Via Satellite –

Manufacturing Contraction: How Will It Affect Advanced Manufacturing? | Design News


According to the Institute for Supply Management, manufacturing in the US has been contracting for two months. That’s the first time since 2009. An ISM number below 50% constitutes a contraction in manufacturing.

In August we saw 49.5%, in September, 47.8%. The reports are fanning fears of recession, and most analysts point to tariffs as the problem.

What does this contraction mean for the mid-market manufacturers who have been adding advanced manufacturing tools over the last few years?

Source: Manufacturing Contraction: How Will It Affect Advanced Manufacturing? | Design News