America’s Rivalry With China Is Nothing Like the Cold War | Defense One


The Chinese today are not seeking to destroy Americans’ way of life, as the Soviets were said to be doing in the 1940s. Indeed, the Chinese accept fundamental aspects of our capitalist marketplace, and they have similar interests in halting climate change, fighting terrorists, and combatting pandemics.

China should be regarded as a serious rival as well as a crucial partner. But despite recent tensions, the rivalry is entirely less dangerous than the one with the U.S.S.R. after World War II—and the potential partnership so much more important to the welfare of both nations and to the global commons.

Source: America’s Rivalry With China Is Nothing Like the Cold War – Defense One

The Surest Way to Lose to China Is to Disparage Expertise | Defense One


To state the obvious, there are people on both sides who got it wrong.

All experts should be humble about their assessments and open to the ways that Chinese interests, behavior, and strategy may change. Also, the knowledge of history, strategy and theory continues to be useful tools in research, analysis and advocacy.

For this reason, many foreign-policy China hands of this generation invest in building equally strong theoretical backgrounds as they do in country knowledge. But for whatever reason, we are seeing a trend of discounting area expertise. Because of this, many of us couch our research agendas in language that appeals to generalists and downplay our strong China backgrounds for the sake of publishing in political science journals or scoring tenure.

Source: The Surest Way to Lose to China Is to Disparage Expertise – Defense One

Small Contractors Struggle to Meet Cyber Security Standards, Pentagon Finds | Defense One


Small companies are struggling to meet the Pentagon’s newish network security rules, and even larger contractors aren’t doing as well as they think they are, a recent department study has found.

“For the most part, the big companies do very well,” Kevin Fahey, assistant defense secretary for acquisition, told reporters at the Pentagon on Monday. “But in no case do they meet everything that they thought they met.”

For one thing, big companies tend to give their smaller subcontractors a lot of data they don’t need, which then becomes vulnerable to foreign hackers.

Source: Small Contractors Struggle to Meet Cyber Security Standards, Pentagon Finds – Defense One

A Leftist Loss in Uruguay Elections Wasn’t Exactly a Conservative Triumph


Ending 15 years of governing by the leftist Broad Front coalition, Luis Lacalle Pou of the center-right National Party was declared the winner on Nov. 30 of Uruguay’s closely contested presidential runoff. The results of the second-round vote a week earlier, on Nov. 24, came down to just 28,666 votes out of 2.43 million cast, according to the Electoral Court.

With turnout at 90 percent, Lacalle Pou, a lawyer, veteran congressman and son of a former president, edged the Broad Front’s candidate, Daniel Martinez, a former mayor of Montevideo, 48.7 to 47.5 percent.

During the Broad Front’s decade and a half in power, it pursued pragmatic economic policies and a series of socially liberal reforms, as poverty and inequality fell.

Source: A Leftist Loss in Uruguay Elections Wasn’t Exactly a Conservative Triumph

Europe Is Terrified of U.S., China Digital Currencies—But Can’t Develop Its Own | Fortune


Europe is realizing that its failure to modernize its financial system is not just a threat to its competitiveness, but to its very sovereignty.

Earlier this month, European Commission Vice President Valdis Dombrovskis had also warned of the same threat, saying: “It has become clear that for certain strategic technologies, the capacity to drive cutting-edge innovation will determine our sovereignty as a continent. Payments is one of those strategic technologies.”

Source: Europe Is Terrified of U.S., China Digital Currencies—But Can’t Develop Its Own | Fortune

T-Mobile 5G Service: Where it is and how fast | Fortune


Unlike its three main rivals, T-Mobile decided to start offering 5G service across a broad swath of the country. While Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint rolled out 5G months ago, they each announced coverage in less than a few dozen cities at first, with wider coverage coming later in 2020.

By contrast, T-Mobile says its 5G service immediately will cover 5,000 cities and towns where about 200 million people live. And unlike competitors, T-Mobile’s 5G service should also easily reach inside of buildings. The carrier also published detailed maps of its 5G coverage on Monday.

The service runs in the 600 MHz airwave band, which was formerly used for television broadcasts.

Source: T-Mobile 5G Service: Where it is and how fast | Fortune

Amazon and Walmart Thought India Would Be Their Next Giant Market. India’s Shopkeepers Would Like to Disagree | Fortune


India’s shopkeepers are mobilizing against the global e-commerce giants, alleging they are engaged in predatory pricing in violation of new rules meant to protect local businesses. At stake is the future of retailing in a country with 1.3 billion consumers, where Walmart and Amazon have sunk billions of dollars trying the crack the market and capture its growth potential.

“Amazon and Flipkart are a second version of the East India company,” said Praveen Khandelwal, national secretary of the Confederation of All India Traders at the Delhi protest, referring to the British trading house whose arrival in India kicked off nearly 200 years of colonial rule. “The motive of Amazon and Flipkart is not to do business, but to monopolize and control.”

Source: Amazon and Walmart Thought India Would Be Their Next Giant Market. India’s Shopkeepers Would Like to Disagree | Fortune

Huawei plans to shift research center to Canada from US


Huawei Technologies plans to shift its research center to Canada from the United States, Ren Zhengfei, the founder of the Chinese telecoms equipment maker, said in an interview with Canada’s Globe and Mail.

Ren’s remarks came as Reuters reported on Friday that the U.S. is weighing expanding its power to stop more foreign shipments of products with U.S. technology to Huawei. The U.S. Commerce Department in May placed Huawei on a trade blacklist, citing national security concerns.

Source: Huawei plans to shift research center to Canada from US

The U.S. Threatened France With China-Style Tariffs Over Its Digital Tax Plans. The French Didn’t Blink | Fortune


The U.S. is so upset about France’s proposed tax on digital giants that it’s threatened to use the same tariff law against the European country that it’s deployed against China. But on Thursday French lawmakers approved the measure anyway.

France unveiled the tax in March, following the breakdown of attempts to form a united European Union front on the issue of huge tech multinationals, such as Facebook and Amazon, booking their profits in low-tax countries and therefore paying relatively little tax in the other EU countries where they operate.

Source: The U.S. Threatened France With China-Style Tariffs Over Its Digital Tax Plans. The French Didn’t Blink | Fortune

France’s Tech Tax: What to Know | Council on Foreign Relations


French lawmakers just voted for a digital services tax that takes aim at two dozen large tech companies, including several high-profile U.S. brands. The move caused bipartisan dismay in Washington, and the White House has threatened retaliatory tariffs. But more countries could soon follow France’s lead.

On July 11, France’s Senate passed what’s come to be known as the “GAFA tax”—so called because it is seemingly designed to target Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. It slaps a 3 percent tax on revenues earned by digital services firms that have total yearly revenues of more than $845 million and yearly sales in France of more than $28 million.

Few such French companies exist, leading to U.S. complaints of unfair treatment.

Source: France’s Tech Tax: What to Know | Council on Foreign Relations