Russia Is Waging Asymmetric Warfare Against the US — And We’re Letting Them Win | Defense One


The penetration we’re witnessing could never have been achieved during the Cold War.

But Russia’s approach and our meek response call to mind Afghanistan, where I witnessed asymmetric warfare close up for the better part of a decade. In 2007, after the death of a fierce local opponent, Taliban moved in on Arghandab District, just north of their former capital and my home, Kandahar.

They overran it, literally dancing on the roof of their late foe’s house.

Source: Russia Is Waging Asymmetric Warfare Against the US — And We’re Letting Them Win – Defense One

How in the world did we get here? | TheHill


When future generations look back at the state of our world, with the impeachment of Donald Trump in America and the sweeping victory of Boris Johnson in Britain, these events will most likely not appear sudden or surprising.

They will instead be understood as a public response to frightening trends like global terrorism and financial inequality, a public response that will, over time, be accepted or rejected by the citizenry.

The  impeachment vote today was triggered by two distant events that occurred on September 11, 2001 and September 15, 2008 that forever changed the world. The fall of the Twin Towers robbed America of its sense of security, as two oceans no longer protected us from dangers abroad.

An anxious public was fertile ground for sensational journalism, and media outlets like Fox News capitalized on this. The cable networks made it seem like beheadings and Ebola would soon reach our shores.

The overwhelming fear stoked by politicians and reporting driven by ratings led us to a dangerous cycle of bungled foreign policy, sustained global terrorism, and xenophobia. Our catastrophic decision to plunge into the war in Iraq, propelled by anxiety and bad information, prolonged and complicated the war in Afghanistan.

Mismanagement helped create the Islamic State, which fueled a refugee crisis that flooded Europe.

Meanwhile, the 2008 recession triggered by the fall of Lehman Brothers rattled our financial security. This radical economic change left working people with perpetual anxiety.

Globalization, automation, and migration rapidly altered the job market. People woke up to neighborhoods whose landscapes transformed overnight, with fewer brick and mortar retailers, bookstores, and supermarkets.

Source: How in the world did we get here? | TheHill

Companies, not people, should bear the burden of protecting data


Privacy isn’t dead as some would suggest … but consent is.

When was the last time you read a privacy policy for the apps on your mobile phone? Did you know that apps have privacy policies? How about reading the cookie notice on web pages you visit? Or reading the privacy notice on Internet-of-Things devices like your baby monitor?

Let’s face it—almost nobody spends time reading privacy notices, and if you did it would take 76 work days per year to get through them.

Despite this, privacy policy in the European Union and the United States is largely based on the myth that people read these notices and make informed decisions about how their data will be used, disclosed to third parties, and retained.

Privacy notices are filled with legalese that often grants the company free rein to use your data. It’s time to move beyond consent.

Source: Companies, not people, should bear the burden of protecting data

Trump shakedowns are threatening two key U.S. alliances in Asia


The U.S. is moving toward a rupture with two important allies, South Korea and Japan.

Already, President Trump has reportedly demanded a five-fold increase in the amount South Korea pays toward the cost of stationing U.S. forces there, raising the amount to $5 billion a year. Reports suggest that Washington is likely to seek a similar increase from Tokyo to support the cost of U.S. troops based there in next year’s negotiations.

For decades, Trump has derided America’s allies as “free-riders” who don’t pull their own weight. That is an inaccurate depiction of the large contributions provided to the U.S. by South Korea and Japan over the decades.

Source: Trump shakedowns are threatening two key U.S. alliances in Asia

Bank of England executive urged to quit over security breach | The Guardian


High-frequency traders could have used the information to gain an advantage over their rivals. Carney’s comments, which are broadcast online, can often move currency and bond markets if they give hints as to the future path of interest rates.

The Bank confirmed unnamed traders gained access to a backup audio feed run by an unnamed third-party supplier that was put in place in case the main feed failed. The financial data company Bloomberg handles the main video feed.

The audio feed, which is faster to compress and transmit than video, gave traders a head start of up to eight seconds.

The third-party supplier reportedly charged clients between £2,500 and £5,000.

Source: Bank of England executive urged to quit over security breach | Business | The Guardian

Sanctions-hit Huawei plans components plant in Europe | France 24


Chinese telecommunications group Huawei is working on a plan to build its own components at a site in Europe, its chairman told AFP, after it was hit by US sanctions.

“We are planning to manufacture our own components at a production site in Europe in the future,” he said in an interview at AFP’s headquarters.

“We are conducting a feasibility study to open a factory in Europe for this. The choice of country will depend on that study,” he said.

While there is no timetable for the choice, Liang said “it could happen very quickly.”

Source: Sanctions-hit Huawei plans components plant in Europe – The Observers – France 24

Bank of England audio leak gave head start on briefings | Reuters


A rogue supplier has been misusing audio feeds from Bank of England (BoE) news conferences this year, the central bank said, giving traders access to potentially market-moving information seconds before rivals.

The supplier sent the feed to high-speed traders who could have had a five to eight second head start because sound can be compressed and transmitted faster than video, The Times said.

Source: Bank of England audio leak gave head start on briefings – Reuters

Heard of bitcoin’s ‘halving’? It’s set to shake crypto markets in 2020 | Reuters


If you’re not a bitcoin enthusiast, you probably haven’t heard what’s happening next year: It’s called the “halving”, and it will cut production of the cryptocurrency by 50%.

No one’s in control of this process. It’s a rule written into bitcoin’s underlying code by its pseudonymous creator Satoshi Nakamoto more than a decade ago.

The event, expected in May 2020, slashes by half the number of new coins awarded to bitcoin miners who provide global supply of the cryptocurrency by solving complex maths puzzles.

Source: Heard of bitcoin’s ‘halving’? It’s set to shake crypto markets in 2020 – Reuters

Hundreds defy ban on protests against Indian citizenship law | Reuters


Hundreds of Indians held for defying a ban on demonstrating against a controversial new citizenship law continued their protest in police detention on Thursday.

Public anger over the new law widely considered to be discriminatory is building across the country, with marches and rallies planned despite bans on public gatherings in several areas, raising the possibility of further violence and arrests.

The government ban has been imposed in parts of the capital New Delhi, and throughout the states of Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka.

Train stations around Red Fort were shut to prevent protesters joining the rally, and authorities also ordered mobile carriers to suspend internet services in some parts of the capital.

“As per the directive received from the government, data services are stopped at a few locations,” Vodafone Idea’s customer care tweeted in response to a user’s question about its network in Delhi.

Source: Hundreds defy ban on protests against Indian citizenship law – Reuters

The Brits who won’t Brexit | Reuters


British Prime Minister Boris Johnson won a thumping election victory last week on a campaign to “get Brexit done,” but not before some wealthy donors to his Conservative Party quietly took steps to stay inside the European Union.

Cyprus government documents seen by Reuters show that Conservative Party donors have sought citizenship of the island, an EU member state, since Britain voted to leave the bloc in 2016.

They include billionaire Alan Howard, one of Britain’s best-known hedge fund managers, and Jeremy Isaacs, the former head of Lehman Brothers for Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Cyprus’ interior ministry recommended that both men’s applications be approved, the government documents show.

Source: Exclusive: The Brits who won’t Brexit – Reuters