Coronavirus in the US: Lack of paid sick leave could spread disease | Vox


America’s failure to guarantee paid sick leave for its workers could combine with the coronavirus to pose a serious danger to public health in the coming weeks.

The Covid-19 illness, caused by the coronavirus, is here and likely here to stay for a while. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning people to be prepared for major disruptions in their daily lives. That could mean staying home for days if they get sick.

Source: Coronavirus in the US: Lack of paid sick leave could spread disease – Vox

Elizabeth Warren: the one candidate who gets America’s crisis of trust | Vox


The biggest problem facing US democracy did not come up at the Democratic debate in Charleston this week. It hasn’t really been discussed in the election at all. But it lurks behind all the more specific issues, an unwelcome presence no one quite wants to acknowledge.

It is simply this: The US is in a period of declining social and political trust. Americans increasingly think the system is rigged and that their fellow citizens don’t necessarily share their basic values and presumptions. This makes them strongly disinclined to invest their hopes in political promises of common good.

Source: Elizabeth Warren: the one candidate who gets America’s crisis of trust – Vox

Enacting Trump’s Revenge Campaign at the NSC | Defense One


When it comes to the National Security Council, even a deeply divided Washington has generally agreed on two things. The first is that the staff serves at the president’s pleasure. The second is that the NSC has grown far too large over the past 20 years, bloated by the demands of presidents and forever war. Despite this agreement, however, National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien’s recent downsizing of the staff has rightly caused unease.

Critics worried not just about the timing of the cuts but their targets, which suggest that O’Brien’s reforms had less to do with making government better than with making it purer.

The NSC’s downsizing appears to be part of Donald Trump’s wider revenge campaign against what the president has reportedly called “snakes” in Washington, and it reveals not just how much and how long the president has been intent on purifying the government, but also how much Trump has changed the way Washington works.

Source: Enacting Trump’s Revenge Campaign at the NSC – Defense One

America Must Shape the World’s AI Norms — or Dictators Will | Defense One


Now, based on our collective experience, we believe the development and application of artificial intelligence and machine learning will dramatically affect every part of the Department of Defense, and will play as prominent a role in our country’s future as the many strategic shifts we witnessed while in office.

The digital revolution is changing our society at an unprecedented rate. Nearly 60 years passed between the construction of the first railroads in the United States and the completion of the First Transcontinental Railroad. Smartphones were introduced just 20 years ago and have already changed how we manage our finances, connect with family members, and conduct our daily lives.

AI will have just as significant an impact on our national defense, and likely in even less time. Its effects, however, will extend beyond the military to the rest of American society.

AI has already changed health care, business practices, and law enforcement, and its impact will only increase.

Source: America Must Shape the World’s AI Norms — or Dictators Will – Defense One

Ad spending on 2020 primary tops $1 billion


Spending on the 2020 presidential primary has officially surpassed the $1 billion mark, with more than half of that total coming from billionaire Michael Bloomberg, according to data from Advertising Analytics.

Why it matters: It’s the most money that has been spent this early on in an election cycle in U.S. history.

Source: Ad spending on 2020 primary tops $1 billion

Bernie Sanders: The Democrats’ Donald Trump? | US News


He demonizes the press, accusing the media of covering up his true support. He has a deeply devoted following, some of whose self-identified members respond angrily, even vindictively, when their candidate’s name is besmirched. He complains of a “rigged” process. He doesn’t have much allegiance to party, even as he declares himself the best person to pilot it. The Russians reportedly want him to win.

It may have described Donald Trump in 2016, when Democrats were unable to stop him from winning the presidency. But this year, that man is Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and many Democrats are finding themselves in a similar position – unable so far to stop a candidate who has a movement that trumps politics and is upending the very institution Sanders is trying to lead.

Source: Bernie Sanders: The Democrats’ Donald Trump? | America 2020 | US News

Coronavirus Might Be President Trump’s Biggest Test | US News


The ultimate test of Donald Trump’s presidency may be a virus whose name he misspelled in a tweet, claiming that it is not nearly as “bad” as the media is making it out to be.

And Trump’s press conference Wednesday did not reassure public health experts that he now has any greater grasp of the peril that coronavirus, which causes the disease COVID-19, represents to the American people, the economy and his presidency.

Source: Coronavirus Might Be President Trump’s Biggest Test | America 2020 | US News

Digital prosperity: How broadband can deliver health and equity to all communities


Two decades into the new millennium, the digitalization of American life is no longer striking—it is ordinary. Every industry relies on computing, cloud storage, or other digital equipment to sell goods and services. Employers increasingly demand more advanced digital skills from the labor force. Meanwhile, people’s individual lives often orbit around the internet, whether at home, at work, or on the move. Even decades-old infrastructure—from roads and rails to water pipes and the energy grid—now relies on digital equipment for construction, operation, and modernization.

Broadband is so influential on society that we would now call it essential infrastructure.

That means affordable subscription prices, universal access to connected devices, and a population equipped with digital skills are now vital characteristics of a healthy neighborhood, city, state, or country. Broadband’s applications are so far-reaching that these physical networks directly and indirectly affect a wide range of conditions that impact health and life outcomes, known as social determinants of health (SDOH).

Source: Digital prosperity: How broadband can deliver health and equity to all communities

How the Democratic nominating battle could end in a messy ‘brokered convention’ | Reuters


With the field of Democratic contenders deeply fragmented ahead of the all-important Super Tuesday contests in 14 states on March 3, chances are growing that no contender will amass the majority of delegates needed to clinch the nomination outright.

PredictIt, one of the most active markets taking bets on U.S. politics, on Thursday implied a better-than-even chance that neither Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, the national-front-runner, nor his rivals will secure the minimum 1,991 delegates needed to win the nomination on the first ballot at this July’s convention in Milwaukee.

Source: How the Democratic nominating battle could end in a messy ‘brokered convention’ – Reuters

Coronavirus crash wipes $5 trillion off world stocks | Reuters


Coronavirus panic sent world share markets skidding again on Friday, compounding their worst crash since the 2008 global financial crisis and pushing the week’s wipeout in value terms to $5 trillion.

The rout showed no signs of slowing as Europe’s main markets slumped 3-5% and the ongoing dive for safety sent yields on U.S. government bonds, seen as probably the securest asset in the world, to fresh record lows. [GVD/EUR]

Source: Coronavirus crash wipes $5 trillion off world stocks – Reuters