Browser Fingerprinting: What Is It and What Should You Do About It?


Have you ever heard of browser fingerprinting?

It’s okay if you haven’t, since almost nobody else has ever heard of it, either.

Browser fingerprinting is an incredibly accurate method of identifying unique browsers and tracking online activity.

Luckily, there are a few things you can do to wipe all of your fingerprints from the internet. But first, let’s start by exploring what, exactly, browser fingerprinting is.

Source: Browser Fingerprinting: What Is It and What Should You Do About It?

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Trump’s Former Chief of Staff, John Kelly, Finally Lets Loose | Defense One


Over a 75-minute speech and Q&A session, Kelly laid out, in the clearest terms yet, his misgivings about Trump’s words and actions regarding North Korea, illegal immigration, military discipline, Ukraine, and the news media.

Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general, said that Vindman is blameless and was simply following the training he’d received as a soldier; migrants are “overwhelmingly good people” and “not all rapists”; and Trump’s decision to condition military aid to Ukraine on an investigation into his political rival Joe Biden upended long-standing U.S. policy.

Source: Trump’s Former Chief of Staff, John Kelly, Finally Lets Loose – Defense One

Super Tuesday looms large for Democrats | TheHill


Super Tuesday is looming larger than ever for the Democratic presidential candidates, even as the next two states to vote, Nevada and South Carolina, command media focus.

Those two states are particularly important for Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who could copper-fasten his front-runner status with a win in Nevada, and for former Vice President Joe Biden, who desperately needs a strong showing in South Carolina.

But Super Tuesday will be the most critical day of the primary campaign — and it could be the end of the road for several White House hopefuls.

Source: The Memo: Super Tuesday looms large for Democrats | TheHill

Volkswagen diesel settlement talks with German consumer groups fail | Reuters


Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) said talks with consumer groups who were seeking compensation over excessive pollution caused by VW’s diesel cars had failed.

In 2015 the carmaker admitted to using manipulated engine management software to mask excessive pollution levels in its diesel cars, sparking a raft of prosecutions and lawsuits.

Source: Volkswagen diesel settlement talks with German consumer groups fail – Reuters

U.S. accuses Huawei of stealing trade secrets, assisting Iran | Reuters


U.S. prosecutors on Thursday accused Huawei of stealing trade secrets and helping Iran track protesters in its latest indictment against the Chinese company, escalating the U.S. battle with the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker.

In the indictment, which supersedes one unsealed last year in federal court in Brooklyn, New York, Huawei Technologies Co was charged with conspiring to steal trade secrets from six U.S. technology companies and to violate a racketeering law typically used to combat organized crime.

Source: U.S. accuses Huawei of stealing trade secrets, assisting Iran – Reuters

On the trail: Bloomberg targeted by Democratic rivals, Biden raises money for crucial states | Reuters


U.S. Democratic presidential candidates took aim on Thursday at a rival whose name has not yet appeared on the ballot in the early voting states but whose television ads have blanketed the airwaves: billionaire former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who lagged in the first two nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire, targeted Bloomberg over past policing tactics in the largest U.S. city and his comments about a mortgage practice widely seen as racially discriminatory.

Source: On the trail: Bloomberg targeted by Democratic rivals, Biden raises money for crucial states – Reuters

Elizabeth Warren’s Narrow Path Forward in the Presidential Race | US News


Elizabeth Warren faces a narrower path to the Democratic nomination after a disappointing finish in the New Hampshire primary that raised questions about a candidate who had been consistently heralded as a front-running force.

Her middling and underwhelming performances in both Iowa and New Hampshire come in stark contrast to where the senator from Massachusetts stood last summer and fall as a dominant candidate. Surging poll numbers and massive crowds at campaign rallies had attracted major coverage and thrust her into the top tier with Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Source: Elizabeth Warren’s Narrow Path Forward in the Presidential Race | America 2020 | US News

Democratic Presidential Candidates Search for the ‘Right’ Campaign Cash | US News


They need it, but they resent that they need it. They’ve acquired it, but are almost embarrassed by it. They rail against it, but end virtually every speech or debate closing remarks asking people to please give it to them.

The Democratic presidential contenders have a love-hate relationship with money, which is essential to running a presidential campaign but which – among Democrats at least – carries a sort of dirty quality that has contenders competing not just for dollars but for dollars they claim are cleaner than everyone else’s.

Source: Democratic Presidential Candidates Search for the ‘Right’ Campaign Cash | America 2020 | US News

David Brooks is correct: Both the quality and quantity of our relationships matter


It’s embarrassing to admit, since I work in a Center on Children and Families, but I had never really thought about the word “relative” until I read the new Atlantic essay from David Brooks, “The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake.”

In everyday language, relatives are just the people you are related to. But what does that mean? Sometimes, we prefix the term to make it clearer still, referring to blood relatives, as opposed to those, say, to whom we are “related” through marriage. The in-laws are relatives, too.

So the question is: what relationships make a relative?

Source: David Brooks is correct: Both the quality and quantity of our relationships matter

75 years after a historic meeting on the USS Quincy, US-Saudi relations are in need of a true re-think


FDR and Ibn Saud, as they were known popularly, could not have been more different. FDR was in his fourth term as the elected president of the most powerful country in the world, and on the eve of winning World War II. He had traveled the world and was returning from the Yalta summit with Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin. He was gravely ill and had only weeks to live. His blood pressure was 260 over 150. But he was convinced that Saudi Arabia would be crucial to America in the post-war world, thanks to its oil.

Ibn Saud had never been to sea before, or outside the Arabian Peninsula except for a brief trip to Basra, Iraq. He was a warrior who had created the modern Saudi kingdom through endless battles. He had little experience in international diplomacy. He was an absolute monarch backed by the fanatical Wahhabi clergy.

Source: 75 years after a historic meeting on the USS Quincy, US-Saudi relations are in need of a true re-think