EDN | How is a light source’s spectrum measured?


With all the buzz about how the output spectrum of LED lighting can be varied for applications like street lighting, human-centric lighting, and horticultural lighting, the question occurs: how is the spectrum determined anyway? With a nifty little device called a spectroradiometer.

The light source is mounted in an integrating sphere, which is basically a hollow ball, white on the inside, with a port for the fiber optic cable that runs to the spectroradiometer.

The sphere diameter needs to be large enough that the test source does not appreciably absorb light that is reflected off the interior wall, which is why integrating spheres come in lots of sizes (as a point of interest, a test lab I worked with several years ago built a sphere out of the tops of two farm silos, connected by a hinge at one end and painted white on the inside).

Source: EDN – How is a light source’s spectrum measured? – Yoelit Hiebert

Dangers of Counterfeit Semi Chips | Design News

In 2019, the worldwide fake semi market was estimated at $75 billion according to Industry Week. This counterfeit chip market particularly prevalent in the government and defense industries. According to a US government report, more than 1 million counterfeit electronic components were used in 1,800 instances affecting military aircraft and missiles.

Counterfeit chips were one of the key cyber-attack surfaces that Warren Savage talked about in his keynote address at DesignCon 2020.

Such compromised chips are a serious problem for the semiconductor, automotive and consumer industries.

For example, a counterfeit chip in a tank could feed details of the payload to adversaries. Rogue code in a fake semi could shut down the air supply of an airliner. A counterfeit chip could be used to shut down a car in a ransomware attack.

Source: Dangers of Counterfeit Semi Chips | Design News

Startup Ampere Attacks Intel’s Strength | EE Times


Startup Ampere Computing said it is shipping an Arm-based, 80-core processor, a chip it is positioning as the world’s first “cloud-native” processor. Called the Altra, it was designed to process the workloads that are typically handled in the cloud, while also drawing significantly less power than the average CPU.

Which is to say, less power than the average x86-based processor. Intel’s processors for data center servers are both powerful and flexible, characteristics that earned the company a thoroughly dominant market share in the data center server market.

Source: Startup Ampere Attacks Intel’s Strength | EE Times

Huawei was the biggest contributor to 5G standards | Light Reading

According to a new report from research and consulting firm Strategy Analytics, China’s Huawei provided more overall contributions to end-to-end 5G standards than any other company in the world.

“According to our assessment, leading infrastructure vendors – Huawei, Ericsson and Nokia – made more significant contributions to 5G standards than other studied companies,” Strategy Analytics’ Sue Rudd said in a statement.

“Huawei leads in terms of overall contributions to the end-to-end 5G standards, while Ericsson leads in TSG [Technical Specification Groups] / WG [Working Groups] chairmanship and Nokia in approved/agreed ratio of 5G contribution papers.”

Source: Study: Huawei was the biggest contributor to 5G standards | Light Reading

With COVID-19 comes the real dawn of the digital age | Light Reading


The good news is that networks have so far proven resilient to the shock of a bandwidth surge. Notwithstanding a few mobile outages, there have been no major reports of fixed broadband problems in European countries where COVID-19 restrictions are in place.

Even the UK, with its mainly copper-based networks, has coped with an apparent explosion in traffic after Boris Johnson, the prime minister, advised the population to work at home and avoid public places.

Source: With COVID-19 comes the real dawn of the digital age | Light Reading

5 Reasons to Develop a Software Architecture | Design News

Developing software is complicated. With every passing year, software complexity seems to only be on the rise. More features are expected from stakeholders. Hardware advances, creating ever more complex devices to work with.

Even simple applications can have several dozen software modules, an operating system and in today’s environment, internet connectivity. Unfortunately, a lot of companies I encounter skip over developing a software architecture for their systems. While this can be fine for simple, DIY projects, in product development, this can lead to spaghetti code, missed delivery deadlines and ballooning development costs.

In today’s post, we are going to discuss the five reason that you need to develop a software architecture (even if your software has already been written).

Source: 5 Reasons to Develop a Software Architecture | Design News

Product-centric Development is Dead: Long Live Product Line Engineering | Design News


A Product Line Engineering (PLE) approach allows companies to build a product line portfolio as a single production system rather than a multitude of individual products.

This approach promises big improvements over the traditional product-center engineering strategy. The upcoming ISO Standard 26580 will establish necessary PLE frameworks and interfaces to primary systems engineering tool suites.

To learn more about this shift from product-centric to product line engineering, Design News talked with Dr. Charles Krueger, founder and CEO of BigLever Software, and William J Bolander, Principle Consultant at Methodpark. What follows is a portion of that conversation.

Source: Product-centric Development is Dead: Long Live Product Line Engineering | Design News

EDN | Five unintended benefits of 5G


While much of the industry is opining on the future benefits of 5G, there are other benefits as well. The huge investments in components, equipment, and know-how will spin off benefits outside of directly 5G networking. Here are five I’ve identified.

Source: EDN – Five unintended benefits of 5G – Larry Desjardin

EDN | Protecting antennas


The shroud serves to protect the antenna(s) within from vandalism. Nobody can climb up and get to the antennas to do them any harm. Additionally, if nobody can see the antennas, it diminishes the temptation.

I just couldn’t help noticing the parallel to an arrangement being used at Clark Botanical Garden in Albertson, NY that protects a bird house from climbing squirrels.

Source: EDN – Protecting antennas –

EU pressures Netflix to lower bandwidth during outbreak


Thierry Breton, the European Union’s Internal Market and Services Commissioner has called on streaming services to take steps to prevent an internet gridlock in the wake of the Coronavirus.

Speaking directly to content providers such as Netflix and YouTube, Breton expressed his concern that such streaming service would have on communications networks given the increase in people working from home due to the virus.

“Streaming platforms, telecom operators and users, we all have a joint responsibility to take steps to ensure the smooth functioning of the internet during the battle against the virus propagation,” said earlier this week.

Source: EU pressures Netflix to lower bandwidth during outbreak