Create Once and Test Everywhere: The Promise of Portable Stimulus | Design News


The problem was straightforward: Different test platforms were used by different engineering professionals throughout the verification phases of simulation, emulation, prototyping and other types of testing. In the semiconductor chip world, verification refers to the process in which a design is tested (or verified) against a given design specification before tape-out, i.e., before the design is made into a silicon chip.

The solution seemed straightforward: Create a high-level test environment which could be reused on these different platforms and at different times throughout the verification process.

The reality was anything but straightforward.

Source: Create Once and Test Everywhere: The Promise of Portable Stimulus | Design News

EDN | Make sense of antenna design and matching networks


When it comes to actual antennas in the real world, much of our knowledge is empirical. We know very broadly theories that explain how a point charge radiates (Maxwell’s equations), the need for matching (microwave theory), and how dipole antennas drawn on paper radiate the way they do, but these laws are nearly useless in solving the real-world problem of antenna design.

By sharing my intuition on how wireless electronics work on a physical level, I hope to be useful in shaping a broad understanding of antenna design and matching networks and underscore the value of best practices and hard-earned wisdom.

Source: EDN – Make sense of antenna design and matching networks –

The eight new things we learned about New T-Mobile | Light Reading

The merger between Sprint and T-Mobile is now finally, officially closed. And as a result, the newly combined company – often referred to as “New T-Mobile” – is now offering some new details about how it’s going to challenge market leaders AT&T and Verizon.

Sprint and T-Mobile have previously offered a wide range of details about their merger plans during the two years they sought regulatory approvals for the transaction.

For instance, New T-Mobile will spend $40 billion over three years to build a massive 5G network. It also plans to offer in-home Internet services across wide swathes of the country in a challenge to the nation’s cable providers.

But that’s old news.

Here are the new things we learned about T-Mobile’s merger efforts and go-to-market plans …

Source: The eight new things we learned about New T-Mobile | Light Reading

Supply Chain 101: The DPA Won’t ‘Cure’ Covid-19 | EE Times


The DPA, (Defense Production Act) to be sure, is far from an instantaneous solution.

The supply chain is global, complex, and is now confronted with trade restrictions, travel limitations, closed seaports and reduced personnel. Procurement relationships, forged over decades, will be strained as materials and components are diverted to prioritized factories. It could be months before supply meets demand.

A majority of the plastics, chemicals, fabrics and other materials used in PPE and medical equipment must be imported. Manufacturing lines that are calibrated for one product aren’t easily adapted to produce a different item. Most of all in 2020, the global supply chain has adopted just-in-time (JIT), build-to-order (BTO), lean, and other practices that keep inventory at a minimum. There is no magic “on” button that will fulfill healthcare needs.

Here’s a breakdown of the various elements that make up a supply chain.

Source: Supply Chain 101: The DPA Won’t ‘Cure’ Covid-19 | EE Times

One CEO’s Candid COVID-19 Message | EE Times

The company also invested heavily in digital infrastructure — resulting in digital services now accounting for more than 60 percent of sales — and revived its own branded products. A renewed focus on engagement with design engineers helped the company with design wins and the launch of new product lines combined with deeper engagement with suppliers also led to improvement in sales.

More recent actions included an extension of the RS Pro label to North America and expansion into mainland Europe of the RS Components franchise.

Source: One CEO’s Candid COVID-19 Message | EE Times

‘This Is Where We Work Today’: Engineers in the Covid-19 Era | EE Times


Enabling telecommuting means digitizing all business processes so that information is immediately available to all those involved in a given task. Easier said than done, though, for employees working in engineering. It takes a lot of creativity to set up an experimental laboratory.

Telecommuting is common enough in some countries, but a relatively new concept in many others. Employers who allow it tend to merely tolerate it, but given today’s circumstances, more and more organizations are actively encouraging employees to work and collaborate via remote. Some companies, most of them in Europe, have taken to calling this “smart working.”

Engineers who are private contractors (or who are otherwise freelancing) are experts in working from remote. They’ve had to reinvent their working approach and meet the needs of as many customers as possible. They’ve had to figure out remote network configurations for development tools for MCUs and FPGAs, simulation, and debugging tools, main prototyping and testing equipment.

Source: ‘This Is Where We Work Today’: Engineers in the Covid-19 Era | EE Times

The 5G value question crops up again in South Korea | Light Reading

South Korea’s cool reception to Samsung’s latest 5G smartphone, the Galaxy 20, has turned the spotlight once again on how much value customers see in the next-gen tech.

In a report by Reuters, COVID-19 was among the exhibits in explaining why South Koreans are reluctant to shell out a hefty 1,595,000 Korean won (US$1,290) on the Galaxy 20, which was launched in February. According to a Reuters source, Galaxy 20 sales were down 30% in South Korea compared with the initial reception to Samsung’s previous 5G-ready S10 models.

No doubt the coronavirus is forcing South Koreans to think twice about spending the 5G cash, but there are other factors at play, not least the end of heavy handset subsidies.

Source: The 5G value question crops up again in South Korea | Light Reading

Teardown Highlights Huawei’s Reliance on U.S. RF Components | EE Times

It’s not easy to tell how far the U.S. administration’s attempt at preventing U.S. companies doing business with Huawei can go, given the symbiotic relationship among them. Given the make-up of Huawei’s new smartphone, the answer is: certainly not as far as the Administration wants to go — at least not yet. But Trump keeps trying. Now he wants to force IC manufacturers who use production equipment produced in America to get U.S. government approval before selling to Chinese customers.

Evidence from a teardown of the latest Huawei P40 phone, published by the Financial Times in London today, shows that Qualcomm, Qorvo and Skyworks are still supplying essential RF components in the new phone, while it seems Micron’s NAND flash memory has been replaced by Samsung’s.

Source: Teardown Highlights Huawei’s Reliance on U.S. RF Components | EE Times

Silicon Valley C-Suites: Adapt or Die | EE Times


So as an industry, let us face an uncomfortable truth together: The world has changed. From here, the corporate winners will be those with the cojones to accept the new normal. Adaptation is the only business plan in 2020; maintaining the status quo and waiting for everything to return to as it was is the path to extinction.

Let us start by disposing of the alphabet soup of forecasting – all that V, U and L curve claptrap. Burn anything from anyone pretending to know the shape of the recovery. That stuff is a comfort blanket from a bygone age that will lead a C-suite to oblivion. You could have forecast any outcome you liked while parading around the decks of Titanic – the winning strategy was to run to the lifeboats.

Before recovery, first we must find the bottom. You’ll know the bottom because that’s the point at which things stop getting worse.

Source: Silicon Valley C-Suites: Adapt or Die | EE Times

Tom Choi: OneWeb’s Failure Will Dent New Space Investment | Via Satellite


The talk of the satellite industry over the last few days has been OneWeb’s announcement that it was going into Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and cutting down its workforce in the process.

OneWeb has been one of the biggest names in the Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) movement, and the news came just days after Arianespace successfully launched another 34 satellites in OneWeb’s constellation. Now, the future of the constellation is uncertain.

This LEO bankruptcy also follows the demise of LeoSat, creating more fodder for debate on the topic of building successful business models around LEO constellations.

Source: Tom Choi: OneWeb’s Failure Will Dent New Space Investment – Via Satellite –