May 31, 2020 – Most-Viewed Bills | Library of Congress

May 31, 2020

Number in list Bill number Bill title
1. H.R.6666[116th] COVID-19 Testing, Reaching, And Contacting Everyone (TRACE) Act
2. H.R.6800[116th] The Heroes Act
3. H.R.5717 [116th] Gun Violence Prevention and Community Safety Act of 2020
4. H.R.748[116th] CARES Act
5. S.3548 [116th] CARES Act
6. H.R.7010[116th] Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020
7. H.R.6201[116th] Families First Coronavirus Response Act
8. S.2248 [116th] HEROES Act
9. H.R.6886[116th] Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020
10. H.R.6172[116th] USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act of 2020

Source: Most-Viewed Bills – Congress.gov Resources | Congress.gov | Library of Congress

Senators Seek Suspension of TSMC US Fab Project | EE Times


U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and two other Democratic Party senators have called for a suspension of a planned project by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) to build a chip plant in the state of Arizona.

The latest move by the senators is a further evidence that politics continues to haunt TSMC, as EE Times surmised.

Source: Senators Seek Suspension of TSMC US Fab Project | EE Times

China’s Tech Reach Falls Short of its Ambitions | EE Times


The ambitious technological goals of China semiconductors set for later in this decade turn out to be aspirational rather than achievable.

That’s true of its ambitions to lead the world in AI technology by 2030. Evidence is mounting it is also true of Beijing’s “Made in China 2025” blueprint for semiconductor production.

With a technological Cold War looming, it gets harder by the day to forecast manufacturing growth of China semiconductors. Tightened U.S. export controls designed to block access to advanced manufacturing equipment are likely to set back top producer HiSilicon and its parent company, Huawei, several scaling generations.

Given those realities, IC Insights projects Chinese-based chip manufacturing will rise to $43 billion by 2024, accounting for a mere 8.5 percent of the global IC market expected to reach upwards of $507 billion.

Source: China’s Tech Reach Falls Short of its Ambitions | EE Times

5G Reality Check: Will Rollouts Roll Up? | Design News


These predictions have been altered due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Even now, the IOT remains a critical driver in tying all of the markets together. 5G is an important element in achieving that goal especially with things like ultra-reliable low latency connectivity (URLCC), which allows control of things requiring very high data rates.

The emergence of 5G technology was based on the fast tracking of the standard for Release 16 and Release 17. However, the postponement of the Mobile Congress and other events have slowed down the in-person meetings that are essential for making real progress with the standard.

Online meetings help but just aren’t as productive as the types of discussions and agreements that take place over dinners and cocktail.

Source: 5G Reality Check: Will Rollouts Roll Up? | Design News

5G wacky races | Light Reading

In a fascinating report by Opensignal, average 5G downlink speeds vary widely between different operators.

The biggest difference actually occurs within one country: the US.

Verizon Wireless, according to crowdsourced data collected by the market research firm, boasts an impressive average 5G downlink speed of 506.1 Mbit/s.

Of the ten 5G operators surveyed by Opensignal – stretching across Australia, South Korea, the US and the UK – Verizon Wireless is tops. The next three places, perhaps surprisingly, hail from South Korea: LG U+ (238.7 Mbit/s), SK Telecom (220.6 Mbit/s) and KT (215 Mbit/s).

Source: 5G wacky races | Light Reading

BT 5G turns one year old with not much to celebrate | Light Reading


A year after the UK operator delivered its new service at a flashy press event in London, there was barely a gurgle from the infant on the big day. Next to its older 4G sibling, 5G looks like a late developer.

BT’s reticence makes it hard to know for sure. On availability, the only certainty is that some kind of 5G service is now live in 80 cities and towns.

Source: BT 5G turns one year old with not much to celebrate | Light Reading

Goodbye Huawei, hello Ericsson: Swap-out gathers pace | Light Reading

The award for last year’s most counterintuitive deal definitely goes to KPN of the Netherlands.

As other service providers were ejecting Huawei, worried about a US-led campaign against the controversial Chinese vendor, the Dutch operator dropped Ericsson like a whiffy rollmop. Showing its rebellious side, KPN plumped for Huawei instead.

So far, the main beneficiary has been Ericsson. In at least five confirmed cases, and two that are probable in Canada, the Swedish vendor has already become a substitute for Huawei in either the radio access or core network.

Notwithstanding KPN’s trend-bucking rejection, it has staged a technological comeback at the dawn of 5G and is highly regarded by analysts and service providers for the quality of its goods.

Source: Goodbye Huawei, hello Ericsson: Swap-out gathers pace | Light Reading

5 Boards that Make Rapid Prototyping Easy | Design News


One development board that I have found to be particularly useful for prototyping when a breadboard is required is the BreadShield.

This board is interesting because it has standard Arduino connectors for stacking shields but also has linear header pins that can connect to a breadboard. I love this because I usually hate running jumpers or wires from a development board to a breadboard. It’s messy and leaves an easy opportunity for a connection to come lose which then leads to an unexpected debug session.

The board is open source on github which means you can spin your own if you wanted to.

Source: 5 Boards that Make Rapid Prototyping Easy | Design News

How is the Internet of Things changing woodworking? | IoT Times

Woodworking hasn’t quite reached the status of Industry 4.0 yet, but it’s well on its way. As more carpentry companies, from local family businesses to massive corporations, realize the benefits of the IoT, more transition into a data-driven workplace. Here are just a few of the ways the IoT is changing the woodworking industry.

Companies decrease that risk with a process called preventive maintenance, or routinely maintaining equipment to keep it from breaking. The IoT takes this a step further with predictive maintenance, which determines when a machine needs a checkup. Sensors measuring equipment performance can alert users of potential issues early on.

These IoT devices detect signs of an issue regardless of how recent the last maintenance session was. This solution provides a more accurate picture of machine needs than preventive maintenance, and it helps carpenters avoid costly repairs and downtime. With the help of the IoT, they can keep their equipment in top condition at all times.

Source: How is the Internet of Things changing woodworking? – IoT Times

Designs for Living with COVID-19, from the Sublime to the Ridiculous | Design News


“When I saw proposals to place plexiglass dividers on restaurant tables [to prevent transmission of COVID-19], it gave me the impression of being in a prison visiting room,” said French interior design entrepreneur Christophe Gernigon. So, he came up with a more elegant alternative — the Plex’Eat protective bubble.

The plexiglass cupola allows diners freedom of movement along with unobstructed vision, and it is reportedly easy to disassemble and disinfect. The Plex’Eat is currently being marketed by France’s Sitour, which is specialized in point-of-sale marketing products.

Source: Designs for Living with COVID-19, from the Sublime to the Ridiculous | Design News