Air Force rolls out Advanced Battle Management System devices in COVID-19 fight | Military & Aerospace Electronics


The devices were supposed to be demonstrated during a test of the Air Force’s Advanced Battle Management System in April, which was delayed to August or September due to the ongoing COVID-19 situation. With the test pushed back, the Air Force decided to begin rolling out the devices to support the fight against COVID-19.

The devices are loaded with SecureView, a software architecture built on an unclassified at rest model. In addition, the Northern Command ABMS team was able to deploy unclassified tablets with SecureView to health care workers in New York City and aboard the hospital ship previously deployed to New York City, the USNS Comfort, during the coronavirus pandemic.

Source: COVID-19 coronavirus battle management | Military & Aerospace Electronics

What Will 5G Bring to the Aviation Industry? | IIOT Connection


A range of new communications technologies are included up in the term ‘5G,’ including new radio access technology and antennas operating in the low, mid and high bands of the radiofrequency spectrum, as well as more efficient approaches to beamforming. But what does 5G actually mean and what form factors will need to change to enable its adoption on aircraft, at airports and in maintenance or IT networks?

Initial radio specifications for the 5G new radio were formally introduced by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) a consortium of seven mobile telecommunications and wireless network standards organizations representing more than 700 telecommunications companies that also gave the world the air interface for 3G, 4G and 4G LTE networks. Signals for 5G networks are to run over new radio frequencies within one of either three different types of networks used by service providers including low-band (1 GHz and below), mid-band (1 GHz to 6 GHz) and high band (up to millimeter wave mmWave).

Source: What Will 5G Bring to the Aviation Industry? – IIOT Connection

How Soon Until Private Chinese Launch Providers are Global Competitors? | Via Satellite


The Chinese commercial launch industry is, above all, crowded.

More than a dozen companies have been established since 2014, and while some are focusing on specific elements of the value chain such as rocket engines, more than half are attempting to develop their own rocket.

While some are more well-funded than others, and some more technologically advanced, the industry’s nascency means that there is still significant uncertainty as to which launch companies will survive in the Darwinian world of Chinese tech startups.

Source: May 2020 – How Soon Until Private Chinese Launch Providers are Global Competitors? | Via Satellite

Cheap, Fast Fabrication of Insect-Like Robots | Design News


A team led by Nick Gravish, a mechanical engineering professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, reimagined how to create soft robots to engineer the new design from the inside out, he said.

Instead of adding soft components to a rigid infrastructure, Gravish’s team used inspiration from insect exoskeletons–which have both soft and rigid parts—allowing them to construct soft components for robots in a relatively short time and for a much lower cost than current fabrication strategies, he said.

“We hope that these flexoskeletons will lead to the creation of a new class of soft, bioinspired robots,” Gravish said in a press statement.

Source: Cheap, Fast Fabrication of Insect-Like Robots | Design News

US telcos asked to rip out Huawei and replace it with a quandary | Light Reading

The FCC is asking Congress for $2 billion to finance the removal of all Huawei equipment from some rural US wireless networks.

But that’s the easy part.

The much, much harder question – one that has not yet been answered by the commission – is how to replace Huawei’s equipment with equipment from “trusted” suppliers. What is a “trusted” supplier, after all? And who gets to decide that?

Those are the issues that are under debate at the FCC right now.

.. Yup, you read that right: Some of the companies in this debate are suggesting that the FCC avoid a lengthy vetting process for a program designed to remove equipment deemed a threat to national security. Because apparently it’s more important to quickly replace Huawei’s equipment – and for vendors like Metaswitch to get at that $2 billion – rather than to thoroughly check the replacement equipment for threats.

Source: US telcos asked to rip out Huawei and replace it with a quandary | Light Reading

Huawei avoidance strategy is paying off for UK’s O2 | Light Reading

Avoiding the Huawei 5G pitstop is starting to look like a smart move by O2. Dependent to varying degrees on the Chinese vendor non grata, Britain’s three other mobile network operators are like racing-car drivers whose part-Chinese engines could stall at any moment if conditions change.

As government officials debate the merits and pitfalls of a Huawei ban, O2 is cruising ahead on non-Chinese parts. A 5G leadership position beckons.

Despite launching a 5G service about four months after BT last year, O2 seems to have been catching up on its rollout.

Source: Huawei avoidance strategy is paying off for UK’s O2 | Light Reading

How has COVID-19 Impacted Renewables and the Grid? | Design News


Unfortunately, the close connection between renewables and grid utilities have resulted in shared challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, there have been notable delays in renewable energy construction. Social-distancing requirements and permitting slow downs are resulting in delays for current and future renewable projects as well as improvements to the grid.

Further, the supply chain for renewables – especially for solar – originate in Asia which means shipments will be delayed due to both COVID-19 and the ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China.

With 40 million plus Americans out of work, there may well be a decline in consumer demand for residential solar installations and battery/storage platforms in the home. Also, the overall decline in automotive sales is already putting a pinch on the sale for premium (battery powered) electric vehicles.

Source: How has COVID-19 Impacted Renewables and the Grid? | Design News

TSMC Discloses ‘Secret’ 4nm Node | EE Times


“N4 is an evolution from N5,” TSMC Chairman Mark Liu told EE Times at a press event in Hsinchu, Taiwan. “We’re already in business negotiations with customers on N4.”

Liu affirmed information that people working inside a TSMC fab disclosed earlier to EE Times.

Source: TSMC Discloses ‘Secret’ 4nm Node | EE Times

Industry Adrift? Not at All | EE Times Europe

The tech sector has too many innovations lined up — addressing business as well as consumer interests — to stay in the doldrums too long. Growth areas include automotive, communications and connectivity, industrial, medical, power, and transportation.

Semiconductors are becoming a staple of the equipment used in many sectors of the economy, and that trend will only accelerate as more companies pursue the competitive advantages of automated manufacturing processes.

Source: Industry Adrift? Not at All – EE Times Europe

Arm China CEO: Good or Gone? | EE Times


First, the Arm China WeChat public account immediately issued a statement, saying “No personnel changes have occurred in Arm China, and chairman and CEO Allen Wu continues to lead the company.”

Then came Arm’s public statement — via e-mail press release sent to media — stressing that chairman and CEO Allen Wu has been removed.

The problem here is that Arm China appears split into two camps, who issued contradicting press releases. One states that Wu was removed from Arm China. Another insists that Wu is still in charge.

The original media report which broke the story quoted Arm insiders, who explained: “I was in a state of anxiety last week and involved legal procedures such as the replacement of legal persons. It has not been announced for the time being.”

Arm is a chip architecture company under the Softbank Group of Japan. It is the world’s largest supplier of chip architecture (IP), with more than 500 chip customers worldwide.

Source: Arm China CEO: Good or Gone? | EE Times