The labors of Lundmark: Herculean turnaround faces new Nokia boss | Light Reading


Twenty years later, after top jobs in everything from homeware to power plants, Lundmark will return to the Finnish equipment vendor at which he spent the whole of the 1990s. When he quit the firm, he was senior vice president of marketing on the Internet side. He re-joins in August, a month sooner than originally planned, as CEO.

His start date was officially brought forward today after Fortum, the energy company Lundmark is leaving behind, found a replacement who could start on July 1. Lundmark will have to quickly clear his mind of electric vehicle charging, soil remediation and hydroelectric power. A crash course in 5G, optical networks and cloud-native software will be his first priority.

Source: The labors of Lundmark: Herculean turnaround faces new Nokia boss | Light Reading

What went wrong at Edge Gravity? | Light Reading

Ericsson confirmed that it is shutting down Edge Gravity, an internal “accelerator unit” focused on building and launching a global edge cloud network in partnership with a bevy of telcos, cable operators, content delivery networks and data center operators.

Ericsson started to spread the word to partners, customers and employees that Edge Gravity, an underperforming piece of its Business Area Technologies and New Businesses (BTEB) group, “will close its operation over time,” TelecomTV reported earlier this month, noting that some executives tied to Edge Gravity have already reached out to other edge companies or have already left Ericsson.

The process of scrubbing Edge Gravity out of existence is already underway, as its individual website presence and its Twitter and LinkedIn accounts all appear to be gone.

Source: What went wrong at Edge Gravity? | Light Reading

15 Trends to Watch in Microelectronics

The Future of Compute

In his plenary presentation, Mike Mayberry, Technology Development at Intel, talked about how the digital transformation continues to gain momentum, as businesses offer consumers increasingly distributed services, and industry pursues improvements across the extent of the electronics ecosystem. This transformation is characterized by continued strong demand for compute at all points in the network – at the core, the edge, and at the endpoints.

He noted that this transformation demands that we adapt our thinking and move from a hardware/program centric to a data/information centric approach, and to embrace new ways to compute.

Source: 15 Trends to Watch in Microelectronics

New UK Huawei £1 billion Optoelectronics R&D HQ Approved | EE Times Europe


Speaking to the local government council planning meeting, Henk Koopmans, the CEO of Huawei Technologies Research & Development (UK), said, “We want this to be a key facility for Cambridge and the UK”. He said this would be a completely new facility and separate from the existing center it already has in Cambridge, indicating that it would involve moving many of its 200 people currently at its Adastral Park site near Ipswich.

Huawei said it will invest £1 billion in the first phase of the project, which includes construction of 50,000 square meters of facilities across nine acres of land and will directly create around 400 local jobs.

Once fully operational, it will become the international headquarters of Huawei’s optoelectronics business.

Source: New UK Huawei £1 billion Optoelectronics R&D HQ Approved – EE Times Europe

Mercedes-Nvidia Deal: What’s in It for Each? | EE Times

Did you catch the pivot?

Privately-owned passenger vehicle autonomy is out, and automated is in.

Cars won’t drive themselves anytime soon and the human driver will be liable at all times. The trouble for Nvidia is that for L2 vehicles — or L2+ if we are specifically talking about a hands-free highway assist feature — you don’t need the most sophisticated and advanced computing architecture ever deployed in an automobile.

Let’s look at some examples …

Source: Mercedes-Nvidia Deal: What’s in It for Each? | EE Times

Apple Moving Macs from Intel to Arm | EE Times


After two years of rumors, at this year’s (virtual) World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC), Apple finally announced that it was going to migrate all its Mac products from Intel processors to the company’s own Arm-based silicon.

It is expected that Apple Mac products based on a future version of its upcoming A14 system-on-chip (SoC) will be similar to the A14 for the iPhone and iPads but optimized for higher thermal limits offered in Mac products.

Through out the WWDC presentation, Apple called the new processors “Apple Silicon” and never mentioned the Arm instruction set used by its A series of processors.

Source: Apple Moving Macs from Intel to Arm | EE Times

Siemens Acquires UltraSoC for SoC Lifecycle Product Suite | EE Times

Siemens’ Tessent product suite addresses test and yield analysis in the system-on-chip (SoC) product lifecycle. UltraSoC provides monitoring hardware that gets embedded directly in SoC designs, enabling “fab-to-field” analytics capabilities. That embedded IP (intellectual property) can be used accelerate silicon bring-up, optimize product performance, and confirm that devices are operating as designed for functional safety and cybersecurity purposes.

Siemens plans to integrate this technology into its Xcelerator portfolio, which is part of Mentor’s Tessent software product suite.

Source: Siemens Acquires UltraSoC for SoC Lifecycle Product Suite | EE Times

Mercedes-Benz Jilts BMW, Elopes with Nvidia | EE Times


Phil Magney, founder and principal of VSI Labs, told EE Times, “Both BMW and Mercedes have taken a half-hearted approach” that failed to yield any real progress. This happened because “both BMW & Mercedes are focused on selling personal vehicles, and AVs don’t fit with their business model,” he observed.

“When they felt their survival was threatened by AVs, they reluctantly joined the effort. Now that AVs are a less of an imminent threat, they don’t feel compelled to talk that talk as much.”

Source: Mercedes-Benz Jilts BMW, Elopes with Nvidia | EE Times

Trusted DoD Fabs GloFlo, SkyWater Join Forces | EE Times

As the revival of U.S. chip manufacturing gathers momentum, pure-play technology foundry SkyWater Technology and GlobalFoundries will collaborate to extend domestic IC manufacturing capabilities sought by the Defense Department.

A memorandum of understanding between the GlobalFoundries, a long-time chip supplier to the U.S. military, and the U.S.-owned and Minnesota-based trusted foundry includes cross-licensing provisions and the prospect of a “wide spectrum” of specific IC projects.

The agreement along with parallel efforts could eventually help repatriate diminished chip capabilities such as test and assembly as well as advanced IC packaging, said SkyWater President Thomas Sonderman.

Source: Trusted DoD Fabs GloFlo, SkyWater Join Forces | EE Times

June 2020 – Bandwidth Pricing: How Low Can it Go? | Via Satellite


Prices have fallen for video, like broadband applications. But also evident is growing divergence between pricing levels for each application, explains Brent Prokosh, senior affiliate consultant at Euroconsult.

“The drop has been significantly more pronounced for broadband-oriented applications, including consumer connectivity, mobile backhaul, trunking, IFC, and maritime connectivity. Operators have been able to somewhat defend against pricing erosion for video distribution, due, in part, to a relative scarcity of high-quality Ku-band capacity at key orbital hotspots, and the ‘lock-in’ effects or costs associated with having to re-point thousands to millions of antennas, when switching satellites to pursue lower pricing,” says Prokosh.

Source: June 2020 – Bandwidth Pricing: How Low Can it Go? | Via Satellite