Boeing moving closer to deploying next-generation electronic warfare (EW) airborne jammer on EA-18G Growler | Military Aerospace


Airborne electronic warfare (EW) experts at the Boeing Co. are moving closer to deploying advanced electronic jammers for U.S. Navy EA-18G Growler EW jets under terms of a $14.5 million order announced Friday.

Boeing will provide engineering to complete the development of the NGJ-MB in support of the phased replacement of the AN/ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System currently mounted to the EA-18G aircraft. The Raytheon Technologies Corp. Intelligence and Space segment in El Segundo, Calif., designs and builds the NGJ-MB.

Source: Boeing moving closer to deploying next-generation electronic warfare (EW) airborne jammer on EA-18G Growler | Military Aerospace

Wanted: enabling technologies in trusted computing hardware and software for military command and control | Military Aerospace


U.S. Air Force researchers are asking industry for trusted computing technologies that enable secure, resilient, affordable command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, and cyber information processing.

Researchers are focusing on technologies that support hardware and software for high-assurance, trusted, and secure computer architectures.

Source: Wanted: enabling technologies in trusted computing hardware and software for military command and control | Military Aerospace

Boeing to provide kits to enable laser-guided all-weather JDAM smart munitions to attack moving targets | Military Aerospace


Smart munitions experts at the Boeing Co. are building modification kits to enable the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) to attack moving targets by homing in on laser beams.

The PLGS works with the KMU-572 guidance set to create the Laser JDAM smart bomb. The PLGS consists of the DSU-38 A/B laser seeker and a wire harness fixed under the bomb body to connect the laser seeker with the tail kit, which controls the bomb in flight.

Source: Boeing to provide kits to enable laser-guided all-weather JDAM smart munitions to attack moving targets | Military Aerospace

Boeing continues support for large unmanned submarines with modular payload bays for flexible missions | Military Aerospace


Undersea warfare experts at the Boeing Co. will continue supporting extra-large unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs), which will be expected to undertake long-endurance missions to deploy sensors or other UUVs.

Extra-large UUVs typically are autonomous mini-submarines that measure about seven feet in diameter — sometimes larger. They are designed for launch from shore or from large military ships with well decks, or from large civil vessels with moon pools.

Source: Boeing continues support for large unmanned submarines with modular payload bays for flexible missions | Military Aerospace

Navy avionics experts reach out to industry for safety upgrades to F/A-18C/D flight-control computer | Military Aerospace


U.S. Navy avionics experts are asking industry to upgrade flight-control software in Navy attack jets to reduce the risk of pilots crashing into the ground on difficult missions.

Navy officials want industry to upgrade the avionics of the Navy Boeing F/A-18C/D light-attack bomber to enhance the aircraft’s ability to prevent controlled flight into terrain when the pilot is fixated on a target during an attack dive; spatially disoriented; loses consciousness; or suffers degraded abilities due to oxygen deprivation.

Source: Navy avionics experts reach out to industry for safety upgrades to F/A-18C/D flight-control computer | Military Aerospace

Air Force shows newest bunker-busting bomb to enable fighters and bombers to attack deeply buried targets | Military Aerospace


The GBU-72 was developed to overcome hardened deeply buried targets and is designed for fighter and bomber aircraft. It uses GPS/INS guidance to enable its use in any weather, and enable the launch aircraft to stay relatively far away from the target.

The bunker-busting bomb also could be used against tunnel networks and above-ground buildings, and offer a way limit collateral damage to adjacent structures and their occupants.

Source: Air Force shows newest bunker-busting bomb to enable fighters and bombers to attack deeply buried targets | Military Aerospace

Navy starts work on next-generation SSN(X) attack submarine for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations | Military Aerospace


The new work on SSN(X) is coming at a time when the United States is confronting increased competition with China and its fast-growing navy forces, which Pentagon leaders say is the largest on the planet.

Navy officials say the SSN(X) will possess a renewed priority in the anti-submarine warfare (ASW) mission against sophisticated threats in greater numbers, and will be able to defend itself against unmanned underwater vehicles.

Source: Navy starts work on next-generation SSN(X) attack submarine for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) operations | Military Aerospace

Cyber security problems leave U.S. complex weapons open to hackers, warns the National Security Agency | Military Aerospace


As the military begins to confront high-tech adversaries like China and Russia, weapons that run on computers are at risk of being compromised, NSA officials say.

It’s hard to get around that cyber security reality at present; in a world where the Pentagon wants advanced weapons that can transfer data to one another wirelessly, nearly all of them rely on computers, networks, and data links that computer hackers could exploit.

Source: Cyber security problems leave U.S. complex weapons open to hackers, warns the National Security Agency | Military Aerospace

BAE Systems uses Hydra APKWS rockets with new proximity fuze to shoot down small unmanned aerial vehicles | Military Aerospace


The latest company taking this approach is BAE Systems, which has tested a modified rocket and laser guidance system to shoot down drones for less cost than existing missile options.

Recent tests at Yuma Proving Ground, Ariz., involved Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS) laser-guided rockets used to take down UAVs, which can be tricky to target because they move so quickly. BAE Systems officials say the APKWS rockets paired with the Mk66 motors and M151 warheads, a new proximity fuze, and the APKWS guidance kits.

BAE systems officials say the proximity fuze is key to this new capability, because it gives the rockets point detonation and proximity detection; the rockets don’t need to hit the target to take out the drones.

Source: BAE Systems uses Hydra APKWS rockets with new proximity fuze to shoot down small unmanned aerial vehicles | Military Aerospace