How the chip shortage could help high-tech manufacturing in the US | Vox


Manufacturers haven’t overcome the worldwide semiconductor shortage. Gaming consoles like the PlayStation 5 are still scarce, automakers are delivering cars with missing features, and Apple may end up producing 10 million fewer iPhones in 2021. For a few companies, however, these supply chain woes may have an unexpected upside.

The manufacturing delays abroad and relentless demand for consumer electronics have turned into a windfall for some chipmakers in the United States. Even lesser-known American manufacturers with aging or secondhand equipment have seen a surge in sales for the legacy chips, or microcontrollers, they produce. These parts are inexpensive to make but are a critical component for many devices, and as supply chain troubles have affected larger companies that focus on more advanced technologies, demand for the more basic chips has grown. Flush with customers, the companies that make these microcontrollers are now on a spending spree to boost their overall manufacturing capacity.

Source: How the chip shortage could help high-tech manufacturing in the US – Vox

16 best places in Tokyo for fall foliage | Stripes Japan


Autumn in Tokyo is spectacular. Its many different colors are a magnificent sight to behold. Also called ‘momiji’ or  ‘koyo’ in Japanese, autumn leaf viewing is done since ancient times. This colorful scenery can be seen in Tokyo’s surrounding areas and in the urban jungle of the Japanese capital itself.

In 2021, the best time for autumn leaves in Tokyo is from the end of November to early December.

Source: 16 best places in Tokyo for fall foliage | Stripes Japan

Why do we need a European digital public sphere? | Katrin Dapp, Johanna Niesyto, Jan-Hendrik Passoth and 2 more


For many years, the European Union has faced a crisis of legitimacy—being said to have no demos—which the Conference on the Future of Europe in part seeks to address. Yet the EU is of utmost importance for future development opportunities for Europeans, facing such transnational challenges as climate change and the pandemic. Strengthening European opinion-forming is hence more important than ever.

In Europe we however talk mostly about each other rather than with each other. National lenses shape our perspectives. At the same time the current logic of digitalisation and platform-isation gives preference to those who surf the attention-driven economy for their own ends—nationalists and populists—as recently evident in anti-vaccination campaigns.

Source: Why do we need a European digital public sphere? – Katrin Dapp, Johanna Niesyto, Jan-Hendrik Passoth and 2 more

Inflation Is Good for You


Whenever the corporate media moves en masse like this, it’s a good idea to slow down and consider what’s actually happening, and why.

And what’s happening is this: The inflation freakout is all about class conflict. In fact, it may be the fundamental class conflict: that between creditors and debtors, a fight that’s been going on since the foundation of the United States.

That’s because inflation is often good for most of us, but it’s terrible for the kinds of people who own corporate news outlets — or, say, founded coal firms. And a panic about inflation usefully creates the conditions to weaken the power of working people.

Source: Inflation Is Good for You

China’s leader Xi warns against ‘Cold War’ in Asia-Pacific


Chinese President Xi Jinping warned Thursday against letting tensions in the Asia-Pacific region cause a relapse into a Cold War mentality.

His remarks on the sidelines of the annual summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum came weeks after the U.S., Britain and Australia announced a new security alliance in the region which would see Australia build nuclear submarines. China has harshly criticized the deal.

Source: China’s leader Xi warns against ‘Cold War’ in Asia-Pacific

How ecological thinking fills the gaps in biomedicine | Aeon Essays


Ms Smith is a 40-year-old woman who comes to see me in clinic, having suffered for years with nausea, bloating and irregular stools. She’s been to two gastroenterologists before me, and nothing they recommended was any help. All her tests came back normal – but something’s wrong, no question, and getting worse. There’s pain in her joints now, and sometimes her brain goes foggy. She wakes up most mornings with a migraine, and by the middle of the afternoon, it feels like she’s running on fumes. The gastrointestinal symptoms were bad enough, before whatever is wrong with her started bleeding from the inside out.

She stops here to apologise for the messiness of her story, with all its twists and turns. She wishes it weren’t so. She knows from experience how quickly doctors like me defer to the limits of their subspeciality training, prioritizing problems that can be localized to a single organ system. But that’s actually why she’s come to see me. Some independent reading has brought a new diagnostic possibility to her mind: what about leaky gut syndrome, a potent albeit controversial diagnosis in which the bowel loses its ability to function as a defensive barrier, becoming suddenly unable to protect the body from its contents?

Source: How ecological thinking fills the gaps in biomedicine | Aeon Essays