If Pandemic Productivity Is Up, Why Is Innovation Slowing Down? | Knowledge@Wharton


A new study finds that productivity has remained stable or even increased for many companies that shifted to remote work during the coronavirus pandemic. However, innovation has taken a hit as both leaders and employees feel more distant from each other.

Businesses tend to spend less money and take less risks during uncertain times, but researchers also attribute the current innovation deficit to the difficulty with collaboration that often comes with working from home. Videoconferencing and instant messaging apps can’t perfectly replicate the dynamics of being together in the same room, hashing out ideas and feeding off the energy of co-workers.

Source: If Pandemic Productivity Is Up, Why Is Innovation Slowing Down? – Knowledge@Wharton

Edward Luce on the ‘Even Deeper Divide’ of the U.S. Election—and After


As the U.S. presidential election campaign comes down to its frenetic closing days, the divisions that have wracked the country for the past four years of Donald Trump’s presidency have come into even sharper contrast. The resulting atmosphere of mistrust and suspicion has only magnified what’s at stake in the election, for the U.S. and the world.

Whether Trump or Democratic nominee Joe Biden wins, they will face a global landscape characterized by great power competition, says Edward Luce, columnist and U.S. national editor for the Financial Times, in which America’s relative power is declining and the appeal of its model is no longer always prevailing.

Source: Edward Luce on the ‘Even Deeper Divide’ of the U.S. Election—and After

GovExec Daily: The Coming Evictions Crisis | Government Executive


When the economic downturn that followed the coronavirus quarantine happened, millions of Americans lost their income source. In response, local and state governments put eviction moratoriums, but many of those eviction moratoriums ended on Aug. 1, leaving many with no income and big back rent bills coming due.

Emma Coleman is a reporter for GovExec sibling site Route Fifty. She joined the podcast to discuss the coming evictions crisis and potential solutions.

Source: GovExec Daily: The Coming Evictions Crisis – Government Executive

GovExec Daily: The State of Federal Law Enforcement and Protests | Government Executive


Oregon Governor Kate Brown announced recently that federal law enforcement officers would withdraw from Portland, with some conditions. GovExec Senior Correspondent Eric Katz is covering the story of federal law enforcement at protests and he joined the show to discuss the present – and future – of these actions.

Source: GovExec Daily: The State of Federal Law Enforcement and Protests – Government Executive

Listen to Hundreds of Free Audiobooks, From Classics to Educational Texts | Smithsonian Magazine


With classrooms closed due to COVID-19, millions of students across the United States are venturing into the realm of distance learning. To support these efforts, Amazon’s audiobook service, Audible, has launched an online collection of hundreds of free audiobooks primed for both education and entertainment.

The website doesn’t require a log-in, sign-up or payment information. To peruse Audible’s selection of novels, poetry and fables—from classics to modern favorites—simply click “Start Listening.”

Source: Listen to Hundreds of Free Audiobooks, From Classics to Educational Texts | Smart News | Smithsonian Magazine

Phil Koopman on Autonomy, Life after Nokia, Graphcore CEO | EE Times

Samsung and TSMC are in some ways in a neck-and-neck race. They’re both using the latest extreme ultraviolet lithography tools in production processes that offer something that’s arguably can be called 7or 6 or 5nm process. And clearly, these capabilities are becoming more complex and costly to deliver, and that’s driving a change in how chip and system makers innovate.

So Samsung’s an impressive chip maker and has deep experience making DRAMs and NAND flash and logic. It falls short as a foundry in that it doesn’t have all the kind of IP blocks and partnerships and services that a TSMC can offer, or a size of a TSMC, which is three times as big a foundry compared to Samsung. And it lacks the blue-chip customer list that TSMC commands, given its status as a leading foundry.

Source: Phil Koopman on Autonomy, Life after Nokia, Graphcore CEO | EE Times