Why Supply-Side Economics Is Right And Keynesian Economics Is Wrong


Undeterred by such failures, these economic models remain entrenched in academia and political institutions. Worse, policies like food stamps, minimum wages, government training and workforce programs, and government spending are at least partly advocated to boost growth, when in fact they accomplish the opposite.

The truth is that work and value-adding production make an economy prosper, and eliminating disincentives to doing so, such as high taxation and regulatory burdens, stimulates growth. But until we discard the idea that demand is the driver of economic performance, our policies will continue to do more harm than good.

Source: Why Supply-Side Economics Is Right And Keynesian Economics Is Wrong

Backroom battle imperils $230 million cryptocurrency venture


To conduct the ICO, the Breitmans chose a complex structure. Earlier this year, they helped to create a foundation based in Zug, Switzerland – dubbed “Crypto Valley” because of its many blockchain startups – that is seeking not-for-profit status, emails show. The idea, according to documents on the Tezos website, was that the foundation would raise money via the ICO, then acquire DLS, the Breitman-controlled company that has been developing Tezos.

Working through a Swiss foundation, the Breitmans thought, would provide regulatory oversight but not too much.

Georg von Schnurbein, co-author of a book on Swiss foundation governance, expressed surprise over cryptocurrency ventures like Tezos setting up not-for-profit foundations in Switzerland.

“For me, the public interest is not clear,” he said. While not illegal, he said, creating a foundation with the aim of allowing inventors to profit from a sale conflicted with its status as a not-for-profit, which is supposed to benefit the public. He said federal regulators eventually might prohibit it.

Source: Special Report: Backroom battle imperils $230 million cryptocurrency venture

We Don’t Need No Education: 3 Reasons Pink Floyd Had It Right | Ciena


Today, the half-life of a learned skill is reducing at a significant rate. According to John Seely Brown, co-author of the book, The New Culture of Learning, it stands at approximately 5 years. This means that much of what you learned 10 years ago is obsolete, and half of what you learned 5 years ago is irrelevant, no matter what industry you work in.

One of the reasons people fail to learn quickly is that they don’t build a solid enough foundation. They paralyze their progress by forcing themselves to move past concepts they haven’t yet mastered. If you can’t get an “A” grade in arithmetic, you shouldn’t progress to algebra — otherwise you’ll struggle trying to learn calculus.

Whether you need to jump start a job search, climb the ladder, or excel in your current role, it’s always a good idea to expand, hone, and refresh your skills. This is where Ciena can help.

I’m so excited to tell you about Ciena Learning’s new Discover Series, an entire library of free, self-paced learning courses for our industry.

Source: We Don’t Need No Education: 3 Reasons Pink Floyd Had It Right – Ciena

The Hacking of the American Mind with Dr. Robert Lustig | YouTube

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) The best-selling author and UCSF endocrinologist Dr. Robert Lustig explores how industry has contributed to a culture of addiction, depression and chronic disease.

How To Identify A Toxic Culture Before Accepting A Job Offer | Fast Company


Finally, Kim Peters, Aaron Harvey and Piyush Patel all agree that there is no better indicator of potential cultural fit than your instincts.

“If your survival instincts are saying ‘this isn’t good, I shouldn’t be here,’ I’d listen to that,” said Patel. “Your second brain is in your gut. If you walk in and you don’t have a good feeling, it’s probably not going to get better.”

Source: How To Identify A Toxic Culture Before Accepting A Job Offer | Fast Company

Silicon Valley Laid The Foundation For Trump—Now It Must Dismantle It | Fast Company


Larry Page and Sergey Brin represent one well-known example verging on the cliché: Both were working at the Stanford Integrated Digital Library Project, thanks to the support of a $4.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation, while developing the technology that would become Google.

There’s also famously Apple’s Siri, which the tech giant acquired from a research company that was working at the time on a $150 million government project to innovate speech recognition.

There are more recent examples, too, including genetics company 23andMe, which was built upon discoveries from the Human Genome project, backed by some $2.7 billion in mostly government funds.

Source: Silicon Valley Laid The Foundation For Trump—Now It Must Dismantle It | Fast Company

For Trump, the Reality Show Has Never Ended | The New York Times


Mr. Trump’s West Wing has always seemed to be the crossroads between cutthroat politics and television drama, presided over by a seasoned showman who has made a career of keeping the audience engaged and coming back for more.

Obsessed by ratings and always on the hunt for new story lines, Mr. Trump leaves the characters on edge, none of them ever really certain whether they might soon be voted off the island.

Source: For Trump, the Reality Show Has Never Ended – The New York Times

Three Reasons Why Hard Problems Are Hard | GovExec.com


Most leaders recognize that success hinges on their ability to solve hard problems.

The fact is, organizations make some problems harder than they need to be. No two will approach and handle the same challenge in exactly the same way. In other words, a problem’s difficulty may be a function of an organization’s culture, not an inherent attribute of the problem itself.

In these instances, there are three primary drivers that make a problem hard:

  1. Organizational misalignment
  2. Resource scarcity
  3. Mismatches

Source: Three Reasons Why Hard Problems Are Hard – Promising Practices – Management – GovExec.com

American Hubris: The Mythologizing of Christopher Columbus | Pacific Standard


Christopher Columbus was a narcissist.

He believed he was personally chosen by God for a mission that no one else could achieve. After 1493, he signed his name “xpo ferens”—”the Christbearer.” His stated goal was to accumulate enough wealth to recapture Jerusalem.

Source: American Hubris: The Mythologizing of Christopher Columbus – Pacific Standard

Introvert Or Extrovert? Here’s Another Way To Think About Your Personality | The future of business

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“Personality traits, like introversion and extroversion, exist along a continuum,” Francesca Gino explains. “In fact, many people fall somewhere in between when it comes to this very personality trait.”

While this gray area is popularly known as “ambiversion,” the fact that so many of us aren’t clear-cut introverts or extroverts begs two important questions:

Why are we still clinging to this black-and-white classification in the first place? And are there any downsides to doing so?

Source: Introvert Or Extrovert? Here’s Another Way To Think About Your Personality | The future of business