Elephants Unmoved by Trump’s Backtracking on Trophy Ban: “We Don’t Forget” | The New Yorker


The blistering statement from the elephants reflected the pachyderms’ contempt not just for Trump but for his two sons, Eric and Donald, Jr., who are widely despised by the elephant community.

The elephants also sent a strongly worded legal letter to the Republican National Committee, demanding that the G.O.P. immediately cease and desist using the elephants’ likenesses in Republican fund-raising appeals and all other materials.

Source: Elephants Unmoved by Trump’s Backtracking on Trophy Ban: “We Don’t Forget” | The New Yorker

Royal Navy being eaten away by cannibalization of ships for spare parts, spending watchdog warns | Military & Aerospace Electronics

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Instances of Royal Navy surface warships being stripped of parts so they can be fitted to other vessels more in need have risen by half in the past five years.

The National Audit Office (NAO) investigation was published as a former First Sea Lord said it was further evidence the Armed Forces were being hollowed out by years of cuts.

Source: Royal Navy being eaten away by cannibalization of ships for spare parts, spending watchdog warns – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Space war: how the Air Force plans to defend the final frontier | Military & Aerospace Electronics


The past few decades have shown how space warfare operations can revolutionize military operations on Earth. The next theater, however, might be space itself.

“Both [Russia and China] will continue to pursue a full range of anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons as a means to reduce U.S. military effectiveness,” said Daniel Coats, director of national intelligence, in a congressional testimony released in May. Republican Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma put it another way while questioning the nominee for NASA Administrator, Jim Bridenstine. “We are in the most threatened position in the history of the country,” the senator warned.

The rhetoric coming out of Washington can make it seem as though we are headed into a future of astronaut grunts and laser guns and space shuttle door gunners.

Source: Space war: how the Air Force plans to defend the final frontier – Military & Aerospace Electronics

Lockheed Martin sensor fusion testbed to boost situational awareness, enhance helicopter survivability | Intelligent Aerospace


Under the Army’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), Lockheed Martin is developing sensor fusion and integration technologies that enhance rotary-wing aircraft survivability and enable pilots to navigate safely in all environments, including when GPS is unavailable.

The MMSF algorithms blend data from multiple sensor types to restore a pilot’s situational awareness in degraded visual environments.

Source: Lockheed Martin sensor fusion testbed to boost situational awareness, enhance helicopter survivability – Intelligent Aerospace

Rockwell Collins avionics upgrade modernizes cockpit, enables unrestricted global airspace operation | Intelligent Aerospace


Lockheed Martin engineers needed to bring Hellenic Navy P-3 aircraft into compliance with upcoming mandates for unrestricted global airspace operation.

They found their solution at Rockwell Collins, in the company’s Flight2 integrated avionics system.

Rockwell Collins’ Flight2 integrated avionics upgrade will convert the flight deck into a large, all-glass cockpit, for easier viewing of critical information on primary and multifunction flight displays and the engine instrument display system, while integrated communications and Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) Mode 5 capabilities will help to ensure mission readiness.

Source: Rockwell Collins avionics upgrade modernizes cockpit, enables unrestricted global airspace operation – Intelligent Aerospace

COTS in space: the 100 percent testing risk | Intelligent Aerospace


The Resistance to Change party members explain the wear out deterioration obstacle by saying: Commercial demand is for more and more performance for less and less financial cost. Many of the end equipment that the components go into have quite short lives (mobile telephones, PCs, satellite receivers, etc.); it is, therefore, possible to reduce the long-term requirement in the design of any semiconductor and assume that a specific component wear out mechanism is acceptable for the specific application.

Theoretically, the above scenario can be true for certain EEE commercial components. Nobody supporting the move to COTS suggests that all COTS components can be used for space applications. Nobody suggests that all space-level or military-level components can be used for space applications. Nobody suggests that selected space/MIL EEE components are not suitable for space applications.

EEE COTS components are not a homogeneous population. A wide range of requirements (e.g., subject service life, criticality, etc.) exists for different commercial applications. In addition, a wide range of component manufacturers are involved in the commercial components industry.

Source: COTS in space: the 100 percent testing risk – Intelligent Aerospace

Raytheon, MetTel Establish Alliance to Secure Government, Industry Communications Networks | Light Reading

This alliance is well-positioned to support the Administration’s IT modernization and cybersecurity priorities, including the emerging security challenges posed by internet-connected devices, including computers, routers and security cameras.

“Security is foremost on everyone’s mind today, especially with the constant emergence of new threat forms compounded by the exploding array of devices and network access points,” said Ed Fox, vice president of Network Services for MetTel. “The world needs a network that meets the highest government security standards and together, MetTel and Raytheon are committed to delivering that network.”

Source: Raytheon, MetTel Establish Alliance to Secure Government, Industry Communications Networks | Light Reading

NIST computer scientist stresses importance of safety, security in software programming | Intelligent Aerospace

We can create software with 100 times fewer vulnerabilities than we do today,

say NIST computer scientists, who recommend coders adopt the approaches they have compiled in the 60-page NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 8151: Dramatically Reducing Software Vulnerabilities.

The report is a collection of strategies gathered from across industry and other sources for reducing bugs in software. While the report is officially a response to a request for methods from the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Computer Scientist and co-author of the report Paul E. Black says its contents will help any organization that seeks to author high-quality, low-defect computer code.

Black and his NIST colleagues compiled these ideas while working with software assurance experts from many private companies in the computer industry as well as several government agencies that generate a good deal of code, including the Department of Defense and NASA.

Source: NIST computer scientist stresses importance of safety, security in software programming – Intelligent Aerospace

Emerson sweetens bid for Rockwell Automation to $29 billion


Emerson’s strength is in process automation, helping power plants and factories in sectors such as mining and cement operate more efficiently.

Rockwell is a leader in so-called discrete automation, helping assemble component parts to manufacture items such as automobiles, household appliances and computer systems.

Rockwell caters to its discrete automation customers using a programmable logic controller platform it calls Logix. It has been seeking to expand this control platform to process automation and cater to so-called hybrid customers using a combination of process and discrete automation.

Source: Emerson sweetens bid for Rockwell Automation to $29 billion

Gulf carriers may be in focus under foreign airline U.S. tax exemption cut


The proposal, tucked deep in the Senate tax-cut plan, calls for airlines headquartered in foreign countries to pay the U.S. incorporate tax rate if:

1) the carrier’s home country does not have an income tax treaty with the United States and

2) the carrier’s country of origin has fewer than two arrivals and departures, per week, operated by major U.S. airlines.

Source: Gulf carriers may be in focus under foreign airline U.S. tax exemption cut