Rhode Island bill would keep Trump off 2020 ballot unless he releases his tax returns


Rhode Island’s state Senate passed a bill this week that would keep candidates off the presidential ballot in their state if they don’t release five years’ worth of tax returns, according to the Providence Journal.

Source: Rhode Island bill would keep Trump off 2020 ballot unless he releases his tax returns

Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | US News


While DACA remains in legal limbo, the educational rights of children no matter their legal status were codified by the Supreme Court in 1982. In Plyler vs. Doe, the justices held that age-appropriate children are entitled to a K-12 public education regardless of their immigration status. Districts also can’t implement policies or practices that might have a chilling effect on immigrant student enrollment, such as requiring Social Security numbers on paperwork.

Plyler vs. Doe was back in the headlines in late April after Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told a congressional committee it was “a local community decision” whether students suspected of being in the country illegally would be reported to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. She walked back her remark in a subsequent hearing two weeks later.

Source: Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | The Report | US News

U.N. calls on U.S. to find alternatives to detaining child migrants | Reuters


The United States has faced fierce criticism for separating more than 2,300 children from their families in order to prosecute their parents for crossing the border illegally.

“While we acknowledge the U.S. government’s decision not to continue separating children from their parents, we understand that the practice now will be to detain the children with their parents,” U.N. human rights spokeswoman Ravina Shamdasani told a Geneva briefing.

Source: U.N. calls on U.S. to find alternatives to detaining child migrants | Reuters

Data gap in immigration systems could keep families separated | FCW


ORR (Office of Refugee Resettlement) records can be shared with advocates for minors in the system, contractors working on their care, DHS agencies and relatives. As a practical matter, parents who are in custody may find it difficult to keep track of their children. ORR has a toll-free 800-number to get information from a call center, but parents are required to get permission from ICE to make calls and must keep track of an eight- or nine-digit alien number.

“The disconnect between DHS and HHS systems is likely due to the fact that the Trump administration policy imposed a new requirement,” said Frank Baitman, the former CIO of HHS.. “It clearly wasn’t well thought out.”

Source: Data gap in immigration systems could keep families separated — FCW

A Cult Expert Finds Familiar Patterns of Behavior in Trump’s GOP | Pacific Standard


Polling suggests the party has been shrinking, and its remaining members are solidly behind Trump, giving him a remarkable 87 percent support in a recent poll.

Even the policy of separating immigrant parents and children, which directly contradicts the traditional conservative belief in the sanctity of the family, was supported by more than half of Republicans before Trump rescinded it under pressure on Wednesday.

Source: A Cult Expert Finds Familiar Patterns of Behavior in Trump’s GOP – Pacific Standard

Senators hammer Ross over Trump tariffs | TheHill


On the hot seat, Ross defended the tariffs as necessary to protect American businesses.

The heated hearing comes as lawmakers in both parties have raised alarm over Trump’s moves in recent weeks to implement a series of tariffs on China as well as U.S. allies, including Canada, Mexico and the European Union.

Those tariffs have rattled markets and sparked anger in the business community, which has warned they could lead to job losses, damage growth and undercut any gains from the GOP tax law.

Source: Senators hammer Ross over Trump tariffs | TheHill

On the Theft and Reuse of Advanced Offensive Cyber Weapons | Nextgov


The interesting feature of these attacks is that those responsible—North Korea and Russia—used the leaked offensive tools originally developed by the NSA. The investigation into WannaCry ultimately revealed that the attackers had exploited a security vulnerability called EternalBlue, originally developed by the NSA.

NotPetya used a variant of the same vulnerability, which is still wreaking havoc a year later. For example, in February 2018, security researchers at Symantec reported that an Iran-based hacking group had used EternalBlue as part of its operations.

This situation whereby technologically advanced countries are investing efforts in developing offensive cyber capabilities only to have these very tools stolen and reused raises three critical questions of urgent policy relevance.

First, are states going to start reusing each other’s leaked cyber tools as a matter of course?

Second, is it possible to prevent the leaking of cyber tools from occurring in the first place?

A third question for policymakers is whether the theft and reuse of cyber vulnerabilities change the way states handle these vulnerabilities.

Source: On the Theft and Reuse of Advanced Offensive Cyber Weapons – Nextgov

The GOP’s Immigration Overhaul Is on the Brink of Collapse | Time


President Donald Trump’s sudden executive action over the border crisis stemmed some of the urgency for Congress to act. But House GOP leaders still were pulling out the stops to bring reluctant Republicans on board in hopes of resolving broader immigration issues ahead of the November midterm election.

Passage of the bill was always a long shot, but failure may now come at a steeper price as Republicans — and Trump — have raised expectations that, as the party in control of Congress and the White House, they can fix the nation’s long-standing immigration problems.

Source: The GOP’s Immigration Overhaul Is on the Brink of Collapse | Time

Party polarization top issue as voters more energized about midterms than previous years | TheHill


The partisan wars that have ground Washington to a halt, on display each day on cable news channels, are having a stronger effect on the electorate, a new survey from the Pew Research Center shows.

More voters say they will use their ballot to send a message for or against the president than in recent midterm elections.

Source: Party polarization top issue as voters more energized about midterms than previous years | TheHill

Trump backs down in rare reversal | TheHill


.. the president decided to change course following days of blanket news coverage featuring images of young children, often in tears, being held in metal cages inside detention facilities near the U.S.-Mexico border.

Those images sparked international outcry, which was amplified by Pope Francis, who called family separation “immoral.” Republican lawmakers criticized the practice as “cruel,” and expressed concern the issue could hurt the party’s chances ahead of the November midterm elections.

Trump’s order seems unlikely to completely solve the problem.

Source: Trump backs down in rare reversal | TheHill

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