Government Space is Business Space | Via Satellite


What’s the proper dividing line between what government does and what business does? This is not a political question — it is meant in the context of the space industry.

There used to be a pretty bright dividing line. There was NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and other space agencies in civilian space, and the military and security services operating in military space.

The demands of security and resilience against attack still keep military space a separate and largely secret kingdom. But even there, the military doesn’t build things; it contracts with private-sector companies to design and build them. It engages companies and outside contractors to operate a lot of them. And, of course, it uses commercial satellite capacity to handle the majority of its communications traffic.

What is true of military space is even more emphatically true of civilian space.

We have entered an era where government space increasingly is business space.

Source: Government Space is Business Space – Via Satellite –

C-Band Alliance Pushes for Private 5G Auction at Congressional Hearing | Via Satellite

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The C-Band Alliance (CBA) put up a fight for its 5G spectrum allocation plan at a U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing yesterday, as critics cast doubt on the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) legal authority to implement a private auction.

At the hearing, titled “Our Wireless Future: Building a Comprehensive Approach to Spectrum Policy,” Peter Pitsch, CBA’s lead government relations advocate (and former associate general counsel for Intel), pleaded the organization’s case for satellite operators who hold the licenses to the mid-band spectrum targeted for reallocation to 5G wireless services.

Pitsch said that the fastest way to repurpose mid-band spectrum was through a “marketplace auction” overseen by the FCC.

Source: C-Band Alliance Pushes for Private 5G Auction at Congressional Hearing – Via Satellite –

Initial 6G work is underway | EDN


At this year’s Brooklyn 5G Summit, NYU professor Ted Rappaport gave a presentation about initial research for what could become 6G sometime around 2030 to 2035.

Now, you can read the details in “Wireless Communications and Applications Above 100 GHz: Opportunities and Challenges for 6G and Beyond.”

Published by IEEE, this paper is available for free download.

Source: Initial 6G work is underway | EDN

IoT Nets in Two-Horse LPWAN Race | EE Times

LoRa and cellular’s Narrowband-IoT (NB-IoT) are far ahead of a pack of low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) staking out early design wins in the internet of things. The LTE-M version of 4G cellular is a distant third, and Sigfox trails, according to a new report from IHS Markit.

The report suggests that a once wide-open field is beginning to narrow significantly. However, it’s still early days. IHS estimated that just 150 million LPWAN links were deployed in 2018, a figure that it expects to expand at a 63% compound annual growth rate to hit 1.7 billion links by 2023.

Source: IoT Nets in Two-Horse LPWAN Race | EE Times

8 Technologies We Owe to the Apollo Space Program | Design News


A lot of technologies ranging from consumer electronics to medical innovations all either got their start or their first major push thanks to work done by engineers, astronauts, and scientists working on the Apollo program.

Source: 8 Technologies We Owe to the Apollo Space Program | Design News

Enzyme Engineering Turns Plant Waste into Plastics, Fuels | Design News


Imagine if there was a plant-based material that could easily be transformed into synthetic materials, the fabrication and disposal of which currently create excess waste and pollution.

That’s the scenario with a new discovery by a cross-institutional team of scientists, who have been working with enzymes to help solve the world’s plastic-pollution problem.

In their latest work, they have identified a new family of enzymes that paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels.

A team—co-led by Professors John McGeehan at the University of Portsmouth, Jen Dubois at Montana State University, Ken Houk at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Dr. Gregg Beckham at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)—made a breakthrough in using so-called “promiscuous” enzymes to break down lignin to its basic molecules.

Source: Enzyme Engineering Turns Plant Waste into Plastics, Fuels | Design News

Retiring Knowledge Workers May Get Replaced with Technology | Design News

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Retiring Boomers are leaving manufacturing plants with a knowledge deficit.

The engineer who could smell a failing motor or hear a bum bearing is getting replaced by preventive maintenance tools run my younger workers who are digital natives. Automation tools are advancing to accommodate this change. More and more, emerging plant technology requires configuration rather than original programming. Young employees are stepping into the jobs of the future and becoming “robot masters” in the process.

Yet there is a skills gap between the retiring knowledge worker and the young engineer who is set to replace the Boomer’s training with technology. “We’re seeing a skills deficit.

Source: Retiring Knowledge Workers May Get Replaced with Technology | Design News

T-Mobile Reportedly Worried That Dish Is Actually a Trojan Horse for Cable | Light Reading

nullThere’s a new twist in the ongoing Sprint/T-Mobile soap opera, and it reportedly hinges on concerns that Dish Network will ink some kind of transaction with Sprint and T-Mobile only to be subsequently acquired by a cable company.

According to a number of reports citing CNBC, T-Mobile and its parent company Deutsche Telekom are concerned that if they agree to some kind of transaction with Dish Network, a cable company like Comcast or Charter will then acquire Dish and thereby gain access to Dish’s MVNO deal with T-Mobile.

Source: T-Mobile Reportedly Worried That Dish Is Actually a Trojan Horse for Cable | Light Reading

DARPA Summit Updates $1.5B Program | EE Times

nullResearchers from academia, government, and industry are meeting in Detroit this week for the second annual summit for the Electronics Resurgence Initiative (ERI).

The ERI program is spending $1.5 billion of U.S. federal funds over five years to drive the semiconductor industry forward at a time when traditional silicon scaling is showing diminishing returns.

It’s still early days for more than a dozen advanced research projects being discussed at the event. Organizers point to the caliber of companies taking part in the program as an indicator of progress.

Intel, GlobalFoundries, Nvidia, Qualcomm, and Xilinx are among active participants in the program.

Source: DARPA Summit Updates $1.5B Program | EE Times

Emerging Applications Could Transform GDDR Market | EE Times

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When you need something faster than DRAM but can’t justify high-bandwidth memory (HBM), GDDR is just right.

As an incumbent memory historically used primarily in graphics cards for high-end PCs, particularly those for gamers, the last couple of years have seen GDDR technology hit a “Goldilocks zone” of sorts with uptake in emerging use cases such as artificial intelligence (AI), autonomous vehicles, and 5G networking — all of which need speed and high performance.

Source: Emerging Applications Could Transform GDDR Market | EE Times