Even the ancient Greeks thought their best days were history | Aeon Ideas


.. was there ever such a Greek Golden Age? When, exactly, was Greece great?

In fact, nostalgia for a lost greatness can be found in the so-called Golden Age itself. Even in the mid-fifth century BCE, Athenians were already looking back with longing.

his is one lesson from classical Athens that often goes overlooked: once a society has proclaimed its own decline, compelling new chapters of greatness become all the more difficult to write.

Source: Even the ancient Greeks thought their best days were history | Aeon Ideas

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy Retirement Rumors Has Washington on Edge For Next Term


The justice, who was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Ronald Reagan in 1988, recently declined requests to comment on his retirement plans nor would he address questions pertaining to private meetings with President Donald Trump or members of his administration, according to a a CNN report released in May.

Source: Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy Retirement Rumors Has Washington on Edge For Next Term

Senate health-care bill faces serious resistance from GOP moderates | The Washington Post


The vast changes the legislation would make to Medicaid, the country’s broadest source of public health insurance, would represent the largest single step the government has ever taken toward conservatives’ long-held goal of reining in federal spending on health-care entitlement programs in favor of a free-market system.

That dramatic shift and the bill’s bold redistribution of wealth — the billions of dollars taken from coverage for the poor would help fund tax cuts for the wealthy — is creating substantial anxiety for several Republican moderates whose states have especially benefited from the expansion of Medicaid that the Affordable Care Act has allowed since 2014.

Source: Senate health-care bill faces serious resistance from GOP moderates – The Washington Post

At center of Qatar crisis, a $1 billion ransom | TheHill


The crisis over Qatar that is gripping the Middle East hinges on an alleged $1 billion ransom that was reportedly paid to release members of Qatar’s royal family and others who were kidnapped in Iraq.

That payment appears to be the breaking point in the tense relationship between Qatar and Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other countries in the region, according to one report earlier this month.

Source: At center of Qatar crisis, a $1 billion ransom | TheHill

Amazon Buying Whole Foods: An Industry Shudders | Fortune.com


Most Amazon watchers are focused on the some 450 stores the e-commerce behemoth scoops up in the deal. These brick-and-mortar locations instantly give it a national ­physical presence, as well as a network of mini distribution centers for fresh produce—by far the most challenging part of the grocery delivery business because of spoilage and the fragility of fruits and vegetables. (Upon news of the bid, grocery stocks took a nosedive accordingly.)

The overlooked asset Amazon gets in the deal is Whole Foods’ 365 house brand—one of the most coveted in the organic and natural space, private label and otherwise.

The 365 brand is virtually unavailable online, but that will change if Amazon is smart about it. “The opportunity to use the 365 brand as a mainstay of their online offering is really profound,” says Bernstein analyst Alexia Howard. “It puts a huge amount of pressure on branded food sales.”

Source: Amazon Buying Whole Foods: An Industry Shudders | Fortune.com

Bullying junior medical staff is one way to harm patients | Aeon Essays


One doesn’t have to work in a hospital long to experience or observe some form of disrespect. This is hardly a secret. The bullying culture of medicine has been widely written about and portrayed in popular media.

At the start of my third year of medical school, when we would finally enter the hospital wards, we had an orientation: ‘Wear a raincoat,’ the doctor standing at the podium advised. I could expect to get rained on.

A substantial body of data attributes medical errors to interactions among hospital workers. Calls for improved patient safety gained traction from the late 1980s through the early ’90s, when Australian researchers reported a shocking find: the vast majority of medical errors, some 70‑80 per cent, are related to interactions within the health care team.

Source: Bullying junior medical staff is one way to harm patients | Aeon Essays

Trump’s Presidency Gives Liberal Groups a Fundraising Boost | US News


Since Trump’s inauguration in January, however, public contributions to the ACLU have exploded, including a record haul of $24 million on the same weekend President Trump announced his executive order that kept immigrants from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S.

The organization, Moore says, is on pace to smash all of its financial records, top more than 2 million members and hire as many as 175 new civil-rights lawyers, fresh troops to fight Trump’s agenda in courtrooms nationwide.

In a good year, Moore says, the ACLU raises roughly $3.5 million and adds a few thousand members to its roster.

Source: Trump’s Presidency Gives Liberal Groups a Fundraising Boost | The Report | US News

Partisanship Drowns Out Bipartisan Oversight | US News


“Waste and Abuse –the Refuse of the Federal Spending Binge,” was the title of a February 2011 hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

The approach is typical, good-government groups say, of what has happened to oversight on Capitol Hill. Instead of focusing on matters like government contracting and the basic efficiency of federal programs, lawmakers have used the legislative branch’s oversight authority to play politics, either by touting their own agendas or criticizing those of the opposing party.

That trend has critics worried about how – and even whether – Congress can conduct a genuinely bipartisan inquiry into Russian interference with the 2016 U.S. elections, a matter that has the unifying theme of national security but the divisive complication of domestic politics.

“The average congressman wouldn’t know oversight if he or she tripped over it in the bathtub,” bemoans Frank Silbey.

Source: Partisanship Drowns Out Bipartisan Oversight | The Report | US News

No Poor Need Apply: Four Reasons Why President Trump Is Wrong

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Here are four reasons why putting rich folks in charge is in no way a guarantee of superior economic performance:

  1. Earning riches and developing economic policy draw on different skill sets
  2. Capitalism is not about the rich, it’s about the poor and middle class
  3. The rich are likely to view their problems as the problems
  4. The government is not a business

Source: No Poor Need Apply: Four Reasons Why President Trump Is Wrong

The Benefits of Hiring from Outside Your Industry | Design News


The point here is to focus on hiring engineers with strong skill sets and cut back on the laser focus on finding someone who has created your exact product. Here’s why:

  1. Adjacent product design experience brings new design insights
  2. Other industry experience adds new ideas around testing and quality
  3. Engineers from other industries can accelerate your process
  4. Great engineers can readily pick up your nuances
  5. Outsiders can learn and assimilate new regulatory and industry standards

Source: The Benefits of Hiring from Outside Your Industry | Design News