Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market | Axios


Plant-based meat firms aren’t just going after vegans and vegetarians anymore. They’re betting that closely mimicking the taste of meat will let them chip away at the meat-eating market too.

Why it matters: Diets that include meat — especially beef — have a steep climate impact. If plant-based protein gains popularity, more and more people could reduce or even halt their meat consumption.

Giving up meat “is the single largest thing an individual can do to reduce their carbon footprint,” says Glenn Hurowitz, who runs the environmental advocacy organization Mighty Earth.

Source: Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market – Axios

German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine | EURACTIV.com


While German carmakers unveil their latest electric vehicles at the International Motor Show in Munich, the industry associations they are members of have made their position clear: the next German government must fight for the internal combustion engine at EU level.

In the coming weeks, EU legislators will start deliberating a European Commission proposal that would de facto impose a ban of the production of new petrol- or diesel-powered cars as of 2035.

Source: German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine – EURACTIV.com

Should U.S. Companies Stop Relying on China? | Knowledge@Wharton


After more than a year of being pummeled by pandemic-related supply chain shortages, computer maker HP had some good news to report during its third-quarter earnings call last month. Revenue is up 7% over the prior-year period, even though it fell short of projections.

The problem isn’t demand. Chief executive Enrique Lores told Barron’s, “We are selling everything we can produce.” Yet supply chain problems persist, especially across Southeast Asia where many factories have been forced into COVID-19 lockdowns.

Source: Should U.S. Companies Stop Relying on China? – Knowledge@Wharton

France, Netherlands join forces in quantum technology race | EURACTIV.com


France and the Netherlands signed a memorandum of understanding on Tuesday (31 August) to intensify synergies for the research and development of quantum technologies, joining the race in building high-performance supercomputers. EURACTIV France reports.

On the sidelines of a meeting between French President Emmanuel Macron and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte in Paris, French Secretary of State for Digital, Cedric O, and the Dutch Secretary of State for Economic Affairs and Climate Policy, Mona Keijzer, signed the memorandum, aimed at strengthening bilateral cooperation in quantum technologies.

The aim is “a European Quantum ecosystem that brings jobs, income and innovation to our countries,” said Keijzer, stressing that “the Netherlands and France have been leading the way for years.”

Source: France, Netherlands join forces in quantum technology race – EURACTIV.com

U.S. Global War on Terror Has Taken Nearly 1 Million Lives


The U.S.-led global war on terror has killed nearly 1 million people globally and cost more than $8 trillion since it began two decades ago. These staggering figures come from a landmark report issued Wednesday by Brown University’s Costs of War Project, an ongoing research effort to document the economic and human impact of post-9/11 military operations.

The report — which looks at the tolls of wars waged in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and other regions where the U.S. is militarily engaged — is the latest in a series published by the Costs of War Project and provides the most extensive public accounting to date of the consequences of open-ended U.S. conflicts in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa, referred to today as the “forever wars.”

Source: U.S. Global War on Terror Has Taken Nearly 1 Million Lives

The Entire World Is Underperforming, Not Just Africa


The topic of my column last week, the first in an occasional series of a Q&As with interesting thinkers, was ostensibly the rapidly changing nature of cities in Africa. But an important subtext of the piece, present throughout the conversation, was African performance or, perhaps better stated, underperformance on a range of issues.

My interlocutor last week, George Kankou Denkey, noted, for example, that Africa, a continent that is presently urbanizing on a scale never experienced anywhere before, generally lacks urban planners; even its universities seem unengaged with the topic. Elsewhere, he pointed out that although one of the largest megalopolises in the world is fast taking shape in the densely populated coastal region of West Africa from Lagos to Abidjan, there are almost no true highways covering the 500-mile distance between them, and no rail of any kind to facilitate east-west travel and commerce across borders.

Source: The Entire World Is Underperforming, Not Just Africa

IoT device security still neglected despite $1.5 trillion market by 2027 | Embedded.com

Despite the internet of things (IoT) market being forecast to reach $1.5 trillion by 2027, device security is still being neglected, according to Phil Attfield, CEO of Sequitur Labs.

This IoT growth is driven by increased adoption of smart sensors integrated into connected devices and is forecast to triple to more than 75 billion devices over the next few years. With this growth, there will be a corresponding increase in the number of issues and vulnerabilities that cybercriminals can exploit.

Source: IoT device security still neglected despite $1.5 trillion market by 2027 – Embedded.com

With Urbanization, Africa Has Many Challenges—and Opportunities


The extraordinary demographic change currently sweeping Africa is one of the most important challenges facing humankind over the remainder of this century. United Nations projections predict that from its present population of nearly 1.4 billion people, the continent’s population will approach 4.5 billion people by 2100, which is the staggering equivalent in population terms of two Chinas and one India. Other carefully considered efforts to project global population trends, such as a recent study published in the Lancet, predict an even larger African population two generations hence.

Demographic growth on such a scale will affect nearly every human question one can imagine, from the future of the environment; to global trade, economics and prosperity; to conflict and large-scale human migration, both orderly and chaotic; to the fate of the postcolonial African nation state; to the future of many rich societies, whose populations are rapidly aging but many of which face rising xenophobic resistance to accepting immigrants to replenish their workforces and slow or reverse population shrinkage.

Source: With Urbanization, Africa Has Many Challenges—and Opportunities

What Will Give Electric Cars a Boost in the U.S.? | Knowledge@Wharton


Consumers, automakers, and the government will have to work together to pull off President Joe Biden’s ambitious plan to shift the country away from gas-powered vehicles and cut carbon emissions, Wharton management professor John Paul MacDuffie said.

Biden signed an executive order earlier this month that calls for 50% of all new vehicles sold by 2030 to be battery electric, fuel-cell electric, or plug-in hybrid. The Environment Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Transportation also announced the reversal of a Trump-era rollback on emissions standards. The agencies will impose a goal of 52 miles per gallon for passenger vehicles by 2026, a standard that’s even more stringent than President Barack Obama’s 50.8 miles per gallon.

Source: What Will Give Electric Cars a Boost in the U.S.? – Knowledge@Wharton

How the $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill Would Impact the Economy | Knowledge@Wharton


The $1 trillion infrastructure bill that the U.S. Senate passed on August 10 is touted as the largest federal investment in infrastructure projects in more than decade. But higher government debt and its effect of crowding out private capital will undermine the impact of public investment. Consequently, GDP growth would be unchanged by the end of the 10-year budget window in 2031 or in the long run up to 2050, according to an analysis by the Penn Wharton Budget Model (PWBM), a nonpartisan initiative that analyzes the economic impact of public policy proposals.

The bill is a compromise over a $2.7 trillion package the Biden administration had proposed in March and a diluted version in June. It comprises $550 billion in new infrastructure investments on top of $450 billion in funding for existing programs. Its biggest allocations are for transportation, including roads ($121 billion), rail service ($66 billion), public transit ($39 billion), and airports ($25 billion). Other notable allocations are for power infrastructure ($73 billion), water infrastructure ($50 billion), and high-speed internet ($65 billion).

Source: How the $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill Would Impact the Economy – Knowledge@Wharton