The Making of “Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Economics” | Evonomics


An article titled “Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Economics” has been published as a discussion paper in a new section of the e-journal Economics titled Economics as an Evolutionary Science. According to the open review policy of Economics, articles are made available to the public as discussion papers while they are still under review. Anyone can submit a review, along with the reviewers chosen by the editor, and all of the reviews are made public upon final publication of the article.

This might not seem like big news. The need to rethink economics is widely appreciated, the e-journal is not one of the “big five” economic journals from which a major statement might be expected, and the article isn’t even formally accepted yet. But the status of the authors of this article suggests that something newsworthy is afoot.

Source: The Making of “Rethinking the Theoretical Foundation of Economics” – Evonomics

The Labor Market Is Looking Up — for How Long? | Knowledge@Wharton


The U.S. labor market is looking up, says Wharton management professor Matthew Bidwell.

The monthly unemployment rate ticked down to 3.8% in February, the lowest in two years, according to government data. Job growth was widespread across leisure and hospitality, professional and business services, health care, and construction.

Bidwell and other experts agree that while employment numbers aren’t back to pre-pandemic levels, they bode well for the economy. He spoke about the forecast during a segment with Wharton Business Daily on SiriusXM. (Listen to the podcast above.)

Source: The Labor Market Is Looking Up — for How Long? – Knowledge@Wharton

A foundation for the future


Prévoyance is the French word for foresight — an understanding of what the future requires.

CDG Prévoyance, the pension and provident funds entity of the Moroccan financial institution Caisse de Dépôt et de Gestion (CDG), helps meet the requirements of Morocco’s future by managing retirement systems and solidarity funds that support economic and social development.

To carry out its mission effectively, CDG Prévoyance deploys digital, agile and scalable solutions by making use of emerging technologies, with the aim of offering an optimized and successful customer experience.

Source: A foundation for the future

NATO’s Stoltenberg seeks to become Norway central bank governor | EURACTIV.com


NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg has applied to become Norway’s next central bank governor, he said on Tuesday (14 December), raising questions about the bank’s independence from the government if he were to be appointed.

Stoltenberg and his main rival for the job, Norges Bank deputy governor Ida Wolden Bache, both said they had been encouraged by the government to apply.

“The finance ministry contacted me in November and asked whether I would consider applying for the position. I’ve done that now and this is a job I’m very motivated for,” Stoltenberg told news agency NTB.

Source: NATO’s Stoltenberg seeks to become Norway central bank governor – EURACTIV.com

Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market | Axios


Plant-based meat firms aren’t just going after vegans and vegetarians anymore. They’re betting that closely mimicking the taste of meat will let them chip away at the meat-eating market too.

Why it matters: Diets that include meat — especially beef — have a steep climate impact. If plant-based protein gains popularity, more and more people could reduce or even halt their meat consumption.

Giving up meat “is the single largest thing an individual can do to reduce their carbon footprint,” says Glenn Hurowitz, who runs the environmental advocacy organization Mighty Earth.

Source: Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market – Axios

German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine | EURACTIV.com


While German carmakers unveil their latest electric vehicles at the International Motor Show in Munich, the industry associations they are members of have made their position clear: the next German government must fight for the internal combustion engine at EU level.

In the coming weeks, EU legislators will start deliberating a European Commission proposal that would de facto impose a ban of the production of new petrol- or diesel-powered cars as of 2035.

Source: German industry gears up for its next lobbying battle: the internal combustion engine – EURACTIV.com

Should U.S. Companies Stop Relying on China? | Knowledge@Wharton


After more than a year of being pummeled by pandemic-related supply chain shortages, computer maker HP had some good news to report during its third-quarter earnings call last month. Revenue is up 7% over the prior-year period, even though it fell short of projections.

The problem isn’t demand. Chief executive Enrique Lores told Barron’s, “We are selling everything we can produce.” Yet supply chain problems persist, especially across Southeast Asia where many factories have been forced into COVID-19 lockdowns.

Source: Should U.S. Companies Stop Relying on China? – Knowledge@Wharton

France, Netherlands join forces in quantum technology race | EURACTIV.com


France and the Netherlands signed a memorandum of understanding on Tuesday (31 August) to intensify synergies for the research and development of quantum technologies, joining the race in building high-performance supercomputers. EURACTIV France reports.

On the sidelines of a meeting between French President Emmanuel Macron and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte in Paris, French Secretary of State for Digital, Cedric O, and the Dutch Secretary of State for Economic Affairs and Climate Policy, Mona Keijzer, signed the memorandum, aimed at strengthening bilateral cooperation in quantum technologies.

The aim is “a European Quantum ecosystem that brings jobs, income and innovation to our countries,” said Keijzer, stressing that “the Netherlands and France have been leading the way for years.”

Source: France, Netherlands join forces in quantum technology race – EURACTIV.com

U.S. Global War on Terror Has Taken Nearly 1 Million Lives


The U.S.-led global war on terror has killed nearly 1 million people globally and cost more than $8 trillion since it began two decades ago. These staggering figures come from a landmark report issued Wednesday by Brown University’s Costs of War Project, an ongoing research effort to document the economic and human impact of post-9/11 military operations.

The report — which looks at the tolls of wars waged in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and other regions where the U.S. is militarily engaged — is the latest in a series published by the Costs of War Project and provides the most extensive public accounting to date of the consequences of open-ended U.S. conflicts in the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa, referred to today as the “forever wars.”

Source: U.S. Global War on Terror Has Taken Nearly 1 Million Lives

The Entire World Is Underperforming, Not Just Africa


The topic of my column last week, the first in an occasional series of a Q&As with interesting thinkers, was ostensibly the rapidly changing nature of cities in Africa. But an important subtext of the piece, present throughout the conversation, was African performance or, perhaps better stated, underperformance on a range of issues.

My interlocutor last week, George Kankou Denkey, noted, for example, that Africa, a continent that is presently urbanizing on a scale never experienced anywhere before, generally lacks urban planners; even its universities seem unengaged with the topic. Elsewhere, he pointed out that although one of the largest megalopolises in the world is fast taking shape in the densely populated coastal region of West Africa from Lagos to Abidjan, there are almost no true highways covering the 500-mile distance between them, and no rail of any kind to facilitate east-west travel and commerce across borders.

Source: The Entire World Is Underperforming, Not Just Africa