Emerging media policies for EU 2019-24 | EURACTIV.com


“Healthy democracies depend on a healthy media sector,” Digital Commissioner Mariya Gabriel told a recent EURACTIV event.

Yet, the media sector consistently faces multiple challenges, notably technological and financial, and requires a coordinated response and support from EU legislation to ensure its sustainability in the long term.

This dossier looks at what remains to be done for the media sector and explores some proposals for how to make it healthy and sustainable.

Source: Emerging media policies for EU 2019-24 – EURACTIV.com

Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law | EURACTIV.com

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Antitrust complaints are like London buses. You don’t get one for ages then four come at once in the same industry. That’s what has happened this past month in the auto sector.

First there was Daimler, then the supplier of onboard communications Bury, both German manufacturers at the vanguard of automotive communications technology.

This week, German’s Continental and France’s Valeo, two more leading automotive manufacturing companies, also filed complaints. And they likely won’t be the last.

They are all complaining about Nokia, one of a small handful of companies that own patents essential to standardized communications technologies that car makers and their suppliers need to connect cars to the internet.

Source: Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law – EURACTIV.com

Commission ‘assessing complaints’ against Nokia connected car patents, as MEPs back WiFi plans | EURACTIV.com


The European Commission has revealed that is it looking into antitrust complaints leveled against the Finnish telecommunications giant Nokia, over the company’s alleged refusal to license mobile components that could be used in next-generation connected cars.

Reports surfaced on Wednesday (17 March) that suggested four companies – Daimler, Bury technologies, Continental and Valeo – have issued complaints against Nokia.

All of the complaints relate to Nokia’s refusal to issue Standard Essential Patents for vital wireless components, which the car firms believe could hinder their ability to offer new products and services related to next-generation connected cars.

Source: Commission ‘assessing complaints’ against Nokia connected car patents, as MEPs back WiFi plans – EURACTIV.com

Truck drivers see orders, miles fall in latest U.S. slowdown signal | Reuters

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At a truck stop in Ridgefield, New Jersey, driver Paul Richards reviews a notebook where he tracks miles driven and what he is hauling.

His paycheck is down about 25 percent from the same period a year ago, and his weekly miles have dropped as well.

Source: Truck drivers see orders, miles fall in latest U.S. slowdown signal – Reuters

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How global value chains open opportunities for developing countries


Global value chains break up production processes so different steps—for building your smartphone, your TV, or your car—can be carried out in different countries.

More than two-thirds of world trade today takes place within value chains that cross at least one border during production, and often many borders.

Global value chains have been a boon to developing countries because they make it easier for those countries to diversify away from primary products to manufactures and services.

In the past, a country had to master the production of a whole manufactured product in order to export it.

With value chains, a country can specialize in one or several activities in which it has comparative advantage.

Source: How global value chains open opportunities for developing countries

Is the U.S. ready for a quantum leap in computing? | FCW


While widespread use of quantum computing is likely still years away, experts stress that government should ramp up preparations now for a future that could disrupt the underpinnings of conventional encryption.

Although its application is still “speculative” in some ways, quantum computing presents the opportunity for faster data processing, advancements in pattern recognition and stronger security, explained Dr. Christopher Monroe, professor of physics at the University of Maryland.

Quantum computing works by replacing the binary zeros and ones of conventional computing with multivariable quantum bits, radically increasing the speed of calculations. But with that technological advancement also comes the threat of making obsolete the fundamental cryptography on which most technology has been built for decades.

Source: Is the U.S. ready for a quantum leap in computing? — FCW

Can government fund emerging tech for the long haul? | FCW


Quantum computing promises to upend current cybersecurity configurations, as well as any number of IT applications.

But as government stakes out its early research and development commitments in the emerging tech, focusing too much on the hypothetical could ultimately hinder quantum’s development, said Joan Hoffman, a program manager at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab.

Speaking at an April 16 event hosted by the Intelligence and National Security Alliance, Hoffman noted that while “there’s a lot of excitement right now” surrounding quantum, the technology “is still very much in its infancy.”

“I think there’s a real risk if people’s expectations get too far ahead of what we’re able to do,” she said. “If we fail to identify some sort of medium-term applications, there’s a risk of a fall-off there.”

Source: Can government fund emerging tech for the long haul? — FCW

Gas, a prominent guest at German energy transition event | EURACTIV.com


As Germany is gradually phasing out nuclear and coal energy, Berlin is increasingly considering gas as key in bridging the gap between a fossil-fuels based and a low carbon economy.

“The energy transition is on its way in Germany with the implementation of new technologies and cooperation,” German minister for economy and energy, Peter Altmaier, said in his opening speech at the 5th edition of the Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue (BETD).

He referred to renewables, hydrogen and gas technologies.

Source: Gas, a prominent guest at German energy transition event – EURACTIV.com

Forget Brexit. Why the next hundred days can be decisive for EU climate action | EURACTIV.com

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As EU leaders convene today to discuss the way forward for Britain’s departure from the European Union, they shouldn’t forget about the future ahead of them – including the all-important question of climate change objectives for 2050, writes Brook Riley.

If only EU leaders were taking the same tough line on climate change as they are on Brexit! But where the UK faces hard deadlines and European unity, climate action gets vague promises and open commitments.

Source: Forget Brexit. Why the next hundred days can be decisive for EU climate action – EURACTIV.com

Norway and electric vehicles – a successful combination | EURACTIV.com

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Norway now has approximately 200,000 electric cars, which constitute around 7% of the passenger car fleet. The exemption of purchase tax and VAT are among the financial incentives that made this possible, writes Jon Georg Dale.

No other country in the world has more electric vehicles per capita than Norway. It has a simple explanation – political willingness and possibilities! Numerous benefits include less tax and user incentives, and abundant hydropower is important.

Source: Norway and electric vehicles – a successful combination – EURACTIV.com