Why Did The Populist Far Right In Sweden Make Gains? | Social Europe

SD’s (Sweden Democrats) success has been closely associated with the fact that men both represent and vote for the party.

Of course, one can speculate that men have values ​​that are more attracted to, for example, SD’s second in command Mattias Karlsson’s violent rhetoric of “winning or dying”. Some men can certainly also be attracted to the nostalgia the party represents in terms of traditional gender values or xenophobia.

Source: Why Did The Populist Far Right In Sweden Make Gains? • Social Europe

Celebrity endorsements aren’t kingmakers, but they may be tiebreakers | TheHill


No, celebrity politics is not new.

What does appear to be new is the seriousness with which we approach celebrity politics. Indeed, since Swift endorsed two Democrats (Jim Cooper and Phil Bredesen) running for office in her home state of Tennessee, many have asked: Do celebrity endorsements actually work? Until recently, the received wisdom among political scientists was: “Of course not!”

But a growing body of evidence leads inescapably to the conclusion that celebrity effects are real.

Source: Celebrity endorsements aren’t kingmakers, but they may be tiebreakers | TheHill

Senate Update: Democrats’ Prospects Worsen In Nevada And Arizona | FiveThirtyEight


If you’ve been following our Senate model — you should, everyone’s doing it — you may have noticed a trend of late: Democrats’ chances of winning the chamber have been diminishing. (We’ve written about it a bit.)

Races in red states such as Texas and Tennessee seem to be pulling away from Democrats, perhaps in predictable partisan form.

But Democrats have problems elsewhere too: The races in Arizona and Nevada — a couple of contests that were once supposed to be easier seat pickups for Democrats — have tightened.

Source: Senate Update: Democrats’ Prospects Worsen In Nevada And Arizona | FiveThirtyEight

Healthcare Returns as a Hot Issue for Democrats in Midterm Elections | US News


In states across the nation, Republicans who voted to undo former President Barack Obama’s health care law are scrambling to establish their bona fides on lowering prescription drug costs and protecting people with pre-existing conditions.

And in a year when headlines scream about the Russia probe, indictments of campaign officials and immigration, health care is frequently listed as the top concern for voters – even young voters.

Source: Healthcare Returns as a Hot Issue for Democrats in Midterm Elections | The Civic Report | US News

Midterm elections could decide if more people gain or lose health care


Health care has been a top issue in federal races this year as Republicans and Democrats fight over repealing or replacing Obamacare. But the real action this election might come at the state level.

No one knows that better than Amy ‘A’lana’ Marmel, an Idaho Falls single mom who was shocked when she went to sign up for insurance after the 2010 Affordable Care Act passed and found out she didn’t qualify.

That’s because Idaho is one of 17 states that haven’t gone along with the law’s expansion of government insurance to include those earning up to about $28,000 for a family the size of Marmel’s.

Source: Midterm elections could decide if more people gain or lose health care

The Democrats’ Incredible Shrinking Message | The New Republic


Presented with so many gifts, Democrats’ only question was whether they should focus on one issue or try to synthesize them all into a single, winning message.

“That message is being worked on,” Congressman Joseph Crowley, the number-four Democrat in the House, told the Associated Press. “We’re doing everything we can to simplify it, but at the same time provide the meat behind it as well. So that’s coming together now.”

It did not come together—not then, not ever.

The midterms are less than three weeks away. The Democratic Party still hasn’t found its message, and the issues that many thought would feature prominently on the campaign trail—impeachment, Russia, corruption, #MeToo—have largely been relegated to subtext.

But somewhere along the way, Democratic candidates around the country, almost in spite of the party’s dithering, have found the winning message themselves.

Source: The Democrats’ Incredible Shrinking Message | The New Republic

Ahead of the November elections, Democrats go all in on health care | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


The exchange demonstrated how Democratic arguments about health care are resonating with voters in the final weeks before the midterm elections.

While Democratic enthusiasm this year has largely been fueled by anger toward President Donald Trump, candidates have targeted their messaging to focus more on health care.

Source: Ahead of the November elections, Democrats go all in on health care | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Democratic victory in November would put Trump under microscope | Reuters


While numerous probes have been expected if Democrats win a majority in the Nov. 6 elections, the sequencing and scope of their inquiries has only begun to emerge in recent talks among party leaders and prospective committee chairs.

Leaders are clear about what’s not on the agenda: impeachment of Trump – at least until the outcome of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. elections and possible Trump campaign collusion with Moscow.

Source: Democratic victory in November would put Trump under microscope | Reuters

How the Anti-Trump Resistance Is Organizing Its Outrage | Time


Indivisible N.C. 9 is just one platoon in a volunteer army that has stormed the field after Trump’s election in 2016. The forces are vast and decentralized; they have different ideologies and support different kinds of candidates. But they’re united by a common mission: to oppose Trump’s policies, pressure their local Republican representatives and elect Democrats to replace them in the Nov. 6 midterms.

Some of these activists call themselves “the Resistance.”

Trump and his allies call them an “angry mob.”

On the ground it’s just called participatory democracy.

Source: How the Anti-Trump Resistance Is Organizing Its Outrage | Time

Diplomatic tensions flare between Spain and Belgium over Catalan crisis | EURACTIV.com


Flemish president Geert Bourgeois called on Belgium’s federal government to summon the Spanish ambassador after Madrid decided to withdraw diplomatic credentials to Flanders in response to continued criticism over the management of the Catalan crisis.

Spain’s move came in response to a letter by the president of the Flemish parliament Jan Peumans, who criticised Madrid for jailing Catalan separatists.

Source: Diplomatic tensions flare between Spain and Belgium over Catalan crisis – EURACTIV.com