Georgia Voting Law Under Fire From Corporations | Time


Corporations in Georgia and across the U.S. are taking forceful stances against the state’s new election law—which includes several voting restrictions—following weeks of pressure from voting rights advocates to speak out. Activists have aimed their efforts at large Georgia-based companies in particular, such as Coca-Cola and Delta Air Lines, who initially only offered vague statements affirming voting rights as the legislation sped through the state legislature. But on Wednesday, the CEOs of both companies publicly rebuked the new law, calling it “unacceptable,” irking leading Republicans, including Gov. Brian Kemp and state House Speaker David Ralston. And on Friday, Major League Baseball announced that it would move it’s All-Star Game out of Atlanta, citing their support for voting rights and opposition to restrictions to the ballot box, just days after President Joe Biden said he would support such a move.

Source: Georgia Voting Law Under Fire From Corporations | Time

Georgia Has Enacted Sweeping Changes to Its Voting Law. | Time


Georgia enacted a sweeping overhaul of its election law on Thursday, making it the first 2020 battleground state to introduce new voting restrictions as Republicans have put forth similar bills in dozens of state legislatures across the country.

Voting rights advocates have decried Georgia’s new law as an attempt to influence whose votes are counted and suppress turnout, particularly among Black and Brown voters who helped Democrats clinch a narrow victory in the recent presidential and Senate elections. Georgia voters came out in record numbers in the 2020 polls, helping Biden secure a win in the state by just over 12,000 votes.

Source: Georgia Has Enacted Sweeping Changes to Its Voting Law. | Time

The Indestructible Mark Rutte: Netherlands Election Winner


Dutch voters went to the polls last week and the results were, well, a bit muddled. Anyone claiming to have detected a dramatic and unequivocal message from the Netherlands is guilty of, at the very least, exaggerating the significance of an outcome that really was a mixed bag.

Headlines like the one in The Washington Post—where, full disclosure, I’m a contributing columnist—declaring that the Dutch elections add to evidence of “the far right’s global retreat” betray wishful thinking. There’s a good chance that the far right is in an initial phase of a global retreat, but that was not in evidence in the Netherlands.

Source: The Indestructible Mark Rutte: Netherlands Election Winner

Donald Trump Spends His Days Gossiping, Golfing and Plotting Revenge on RINOs


Donald Trump seems calm. Hanging out at Mar-a-Lago, his palatial club in West Palm Beach, Florida, the former president plays golf, mingles with members of the club, calls old business friends in New York and Florida. The frustration and anger that followed his election loss is not visible on the surface, friends say.

But, they add, the anger is still very much there. According to several Trump allies who spoke to Newsweek on background, the former president has spent much of his time at Mar-a-lago plotting what to do—and what not to do— between now and the mid term elections in 2022. They say he has not decided whether to run again in 2024, and won’t anytime soon, because his presence freezes the Presidential race for the GOP.

Source: Donald Trump Spends His Days Gossiping, Golfing and Plotting Revenge on RINOs

China moves to overhaul Hong Kong politics, squeezing democratic opposition | EURACTIV.com


China’s parliament approved on Thursday (11 March) a draft decision to change Hong Kong’s electoral system, further reducing democratic representation in the city’s institutions and introducing a mechanism to vet politicians’ loyalty to Beijing.

The measures are part of Beijing’s efforts to consolidate its increasingly authoritarian grip over the global financial hub following the imposition of national security law in June, which critics see as a tool to crush dissent.

Beijing is responding to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong in 2019, which it saw as a threat to China’s national security. Since then, most high-profile democratic politicians and activists have been sent to jail or are in self-exile.

Source: China moves to overhaul Hong Kong politics, squeezing democratic opposition – EURACTIV.com

Biden’s Tough China Policy Poses Business Risk to Some of His Biggest Donors


What would Joe Biden do if he had to choose between pleasing his political donors or endorsing a key Donald Trump policy? Well, obviously he’s going to…wait a minute. He what???

On the most consequential foreign policy issue that the Biden administration is likely to face—how to deal with the People’s Republic of China—the new Democratic president seems ready to follow the path set out by his Republican predecessor.

It is hard to overstate what a sea change there has been in Washington foreign policy circles over the last four years—a change driven, as Blinken acknowledged, by Donald J. Trump.

Source: Biden’s Tough China Policy Poses Business Risk to Some of His Biggest Donors

Inequalities and democratic corrosion | Piergiuseppe Fortunato

The right question to ask is not if inequality threatens democracy but which inequalities matter.

The storming of the Capitol in Washington in January has sparked a lively debate on the origins of discontent in American society. While for some observers the events that unfolded that day strikingly reveal the damage four years of Donald Trump in the White House have done to the longest-standing democracy in the world, for others they rather expose underlying fractures already uncovered by the global financial crisis but left to fester for a decade.

Source: Inequalities and democratic corrosion – Piergiuseppe Fortunato

The right to vote for all is a matter of human dignity | EURACTIV.com


As the European Commission is about to unveil the EU’s new Strategy on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for the next decade, Krzysztof Pater writes about one of the areas where discrimination is still acutely felt – the right to vote, effectively denied to many persons with disabilities across Europe.

Krzysztof Pater is a Polish member of the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

It seems unbelievable and outrageous that within present-day EU territory, the last ban on women’s right to vote was lifted as late as 1976, exactly 70 years after Finland became the first among today’s member states to admit women to its polling stations.

Yet few seem to bat an eyelid that this same right is now denied to millions of EU citizens simply because they have some sort of disability.

Source: The right to vote for all is a matter of human dignity – EURACTIV.com

How to Understand the Rage Economy


The attack on the U.S. Capitol on January 6 underlined a disturbing phenomenon that has become undeniable at this point: the fragmentation of the American public into a multitude of angry factions, radicalized in different ways online and holding completely different baseline perceptions of reality. The problem of deliberate misinformation undermining democracy has received lots of attention, but in many ways, the power of fantastic lies to grab people’s allegiance is also a byproduct of a deeper problem: extreme polarization driven by news media monetizing anger in order to survive.

This phenomenon is at the core of what media ecologist and author Andrey Mir in a new book calls “postjournalism.” Mir’s book, titled “Postjournalism and the Death of Newspapers,” is a sweeping look at how the news media evolved and shaped the world over hundreds of years, from newsletters for traders published in medieval Venice, Italy, to modern print newspapers, television, and finally the internet.

Source: How to Understand the Rage Economy

53% of Americans Say Trump Should Be Barred From Presidential Run Again as Acquittal Looms


The likelihood of Donald Trump being convicted in the Senate may be slim to none, according to experts. But a majority of Americans think that the former president should never be able to run for the White House again.

A new poll from The Economist/YouGov found 53 percent of U.S. adults replying “no” when asked if Trump should be allowed to pursue the Oval Office again. Thirty-seven percent of respondents took the opposite view, stating he should be able to run for office in the future.

Source: 53% of Americans Say Trump Should Be Barred From Presidential Run Again as Acquittal Looms