A Vertical Forest Is Proposed in Toronto, Canada | US News


A Toronto-based firm, Brisbin Brook Beynon Architects, has unveiled a proposal to build a 27-story condo building spanning an entire city block in Toronto’s downtown core. The building would slope up toward its peak, creating giant terraces home to about 500 trees. The vegetation would serve a fundamental purpose rather than an ornamental one: to reduce the city’s overall carbon footprint.

The building on Designers Walk, a commercial area in an upscale neighborhood, would be Canada’s first “vertical forest” – and one of at least a dozen architectural projects of its kind completed or now under construction around the world.

Proponents say these buildings are good for the environment and have the potential to change the way millions of urbanites live.

Detractors have raised doubts about their environmental contributions and sustainability.

Source: A Vertical Forest Is Proposed in Toronto, Canada | Cities | US News

Nancy Pelosi May Be the Most Powerful Person in America | US News


Pelosi, as leader of the opposition party, arguably will become the most powerful person in the country.

Not only will Pelosi head the House chamber that is expected to investigate President Trump and possibly impeach him, but she can thwart the president’s legislative wish list as well, experts note. Even before she had tied down the final votes she needs to become speaker, Pelosi was adamant to Trump in an extraordinary, combative public negotiating session Tuesday that he would not get the border wall he had promised during his campaign.

She never said it out loud, but the implication was clear: Pelosi might be ascending to a third-ranking post – behind the president and vice president – but she holds much of his fate in her well-manicured hands.

Source: Nancy Pelosi May Be the Most Powerful Person in America | The Civic Report | US News

U.S. Senate hands Trump historic rebuke on Saudi Arabia | Reuters


The votes were largely symbolic because to become law the resolutions would have to pass the House of Representatives, whose Republican leaders have blocked any legislation intended to rebuke the Saudis.

In a historic move, Senators voted 56-41 to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen’s civil war.

Source: U.S. Senate hands Trump historic rebuke on Saudi Arabia | Reuters

Trump leaves GOP in turmoil with shutdown looming | TheHill

Republicans are girding themselves for a partial government shutdown, just in time for Christmas.

The partial shutdown has grown more and more likely, they say, because of President Trump’s self-defeating comments at a White House meeting with congressional Democrats earlier this week about how he would accept blame for a shutdown caused by his demands for $5 billion in wall funding.

Source: Trump leaves GOP in turmoil with shutdown looming | TheHill

Judge Andrew Napolitano: Michael Cohen’s actions ‘at the direction of the president’ | Fox News

When the federal prosecutors made their submissions for the most part public, they revealed two disturbing facts.

Special counsel Robert Mueller in Washington revealed that in the government’s view, Manafort had reneged on his plea agreement by lying to FBI agents who were sent to debrief him about his contacts with the White House.

And federal prosecutors in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York revealed that some of Cohen’s crimes had been committed with the knowledge of and at the direction of Trump or to shield him.

Then all hell broke loose.

Source: Judge Andrew Napolitano: Michael Cohen’s actions ‘at the direction of the president’ | Fox News

Intel panel expects to refer more cases of suspected lying to Mueller | TheHill

Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) said Thursday that the Senate Intelligence Committee has made “quite a few referrals” to special counsel Robert Mueller of cases where witnesses questioned in the panel’s Russia probe were suspected of lying, adding he expects there will be more.

“We’ve made quite a few referrals,” Burr, who chairs the Senate panel, told The Hill on Thursday afternoon. “I won’t get into the numbers, but where we have found criminality, we have made those referrals, and I’m sure that they’re not the last.”

Source: Intel panel expects to refer more cases of suspected lying to Mueller | TheHill

What GM’s layoffs reveal about the digitalization of the auto industry


While all of those perspectives are relevant, the most revealing aspect of GM’s announcement may well be what the layoffs say about broader technology trends. GM’s layoffs are not just incremental but existential, in that sense:

They are about accelerating the staffing changes mandated by the company’s aggressive transition from analog to digital products and from gasoline to electric power.

As such, the new layoffs (and associated future hirings) are likely an augury of much more disruption coming — in the auto sector, for sure, but also in firms all across the economy.

Central to GM’s announcement is, in our view, what we call the “digitalization of everything.”

By that, we mean that GM’s layoffs significantly reflect the talent and workforce strains associated with the diffusion of digital and electronic technologies into nearly every industry, business, and workplace in America.

Source: What GM’s layoffs reveal about the digitalization of the auto industry

White House preps to change the way agencies go online | FCW


The policy update will help support the migration to cloud, said Federal CIO Suzette Kent. With the new TIC in place, “agencies are preparing for work in 2019 as they now have a clear policy path,” Kent said.

The federal CIO’s office recently put out an updated data center optimization policy draft and a revised policy on ID management. The Office of Management and Budget also recently released updated guidance on identifying and protecting high value assets.

Kent cited progress in cloud adoption. In the last year, she said, cloud email migration among agencies went from 40 percent to 70 percent.

Source: White House preps to change the way agencies go online — FCW

Where Huawei Fears to Tread | Light Reading


It took Huawei about 28 years to become the world’s biggest supplier to communications service providers. Founded in 1987, it finally overtook the 139-year-old Ericsson in 2015.

But its loss of the coveted top spot could happen in a relative heartbeat. (See How the West Can Hurt Huawei and Huawei: New King of the CSP Market.)

Government authorities or operators in six countries, including a few of the world’s biggest economies, have now restricted Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in some manner, supposedly out of concern that Chinese vendors are a threat to security.

Source: Where Huawei Fears to Tread | Light Reading

Evangelical Christians Helped Elect Donald Trump, but Their Time as a Major Political Force Is Coming to an End


Since the 1970s, white evangelicals have formed the backbone of the Republican base.

But as younger members reject the vitriolic partisanship of the Trump era and leave the church, that base is getting smaller and older.

The numbers are stark: Twenty years ago, just 46 percent of white evangelical Protestants were older than 50; now, 62 percent are above 50. The median age of white evangelicals is 55.

Only 10 percent of Americans under 30 identify as white evangelicals.

The exodus of youth is so swift that demographers now predict that evangelicals will likely cease being a major political force in presidential elections by 2024.

Source: Evangelical Christians Helped Elect Donald Trump, but Their Time as a Major Political Force Is Coming to an End