Huawei admit Chinese law obliges companies to work with government, under conditions | EURACTIV.com


Chinese State Security Law forces companies based in the country to “provide assistance with work relating to state security,” a senior Huawei official in Brussels has said, adding however that the company “has never been requested to implement backdoors in its equipment.”

“It is true that Article 77 of the State Security Law sets out an obligation on organizations and individuals to provide assistance with work relating to State Security,” Sophie Batas, director for cybersecurity and data privacy at Huawei Europe told a Brussels event on Thursday (11 April).

Source: Huawei admit Chinese law obliges companies to work with government, under conditions – EURACTIV.com

Commission warns of connected cars delay if draft EU rules are rejected | EURACTIV.com


Plans to get connected cars on Europe’s roads could face a setback of “two or three years” should the Delegated Act on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) be rejected by MEPs this week, European Commission officials have said.

The debate centers around Commission plans for how vehicles should be connected in the future, either by using 5G or WiFi networks.

The proposal has been drafted as a Delegated Act, a fast-track procedure that legislates on the basis of input from EU countries.

Source: Commission warns of connected cars delay if draft EU rules are rejected – EURACTIV.com

Censorship fears linger as copyright directive overcomes final hurdle | EURACTIV.com

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A “censorship of the internet” could be in store as a direct result of the EU’s new rules on Copyright protection, a Polish government minister said on Monday (15 April), as EU member states approved the controversial plans after more than two years.

The member states voted in the Council on Monday to formalize their adoption of the EU’s copyright reform and the plans passed a qualified majority of 71.26%, just above the threshold of the required 65%.

However, there remained a degree of controversy over the reform, with particular attention directed at Articles 17 and 15.

Source: Censorship fears linger as copyright directive overcomes final hurdle – EURACTIV.com

German bosses urge government to stop EU proposal on connected cars | EURACTIV.com


The bosses of BMW and Deutsche Telekom have urged the German government to take action to block a European Commission proposal that would set a Wi-Fi-based standard for connected cars.

In a letter, BMW CEO Harald Krueger and Telekom’s Tim Hoettges warned that ruling out an alternative approach based on 5G mobile networks would leave Europe lagging rivals like China when it comes to the future of mobility.

“We are convinced that mandating Wi-Fi technology will cause significant delay to the European rollout of car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure communication,” the CEOs said in the letter to Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer, a copy of which was seen by Reuters.

Source: German bosses urge government to stop EU proposal on connected cars – EURACTIV.com

Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law | EURACTIV.com

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Antitrust complaints are like London buses. You don’t get one for ages then four come at once in the same industry. That’s what has happened this past month in the auto sector.

First there was Daimler, then the supplier of onboard communications Bury, both German manufacturers at the vanguard of automotive communications technology.

This week, German’s Continental and France’s Valeo, two more leading automotive manufacturing companies, also filed complaints. And they likely won’t be the last.

They are all complaining about Nokia, one of a small handful of companies that own patents essential to standardized communications technologies that car makers and their suppliers need to connect cars to the internet.

Source: Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law – EURACTIV.com

MEPs back plans to quell online terrorist content, but one-hour timeframe is criticized | EURACTIV.com


The European Parliament has backed plans to force online hosting services to remove terrorist content within one hour of reporting, in a move aimed at quelling the spread of extremist propaganda online. However, there was no shortage of those in the industry criticizing the timeframe.

The measures were adopted with 308 votes in favour, 204 against and 70 abstentions. An attempt by a coalition of groups including the Greens and the Socialists to scrap the one-hour deadline failed by only three votes.

Source: MEPs back plans to quell online terrorist content, but one-hour timeframe is criticized – EURACTIV.com

FCC Rural Broadband Fund Would Move Funds From Existing Program | Nextgov


The rural broadband fund that Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai proposed last week would rely on funding from an existing broadband program slated to expire next year, while also setting higher standards for internet speeds, according to the FCC.

Around $2 billion has been available annually in recent years through the Connect America Fund and that same amount would be shifted to the new fund, dubbed the Rural Digital Opportunity Fund, said Mark Wigfield, a spokesman for the commission, in an email on Tuesday.

Source: FCC Rural Broadband Fund Would Move Funds From Existing Program – Nextgov

Did Donald Trump Obstruct Justice? That’s a Tricky Question | Time


Did Donald Trump obstruct justice?

The president’s critics say that he did.

The attorney general and deputy attorney general say he did not. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team was reportedly split on the question.

And legal experts say it’s not an easy call either way.

Source: Did Donald Trump Obstruct Justice? That’s a Tricky Question | Time

China goes all-in on home grown tech in push for nuclear dominance | Reuters


China plans to gamble on the bulk deployment of its untested “Hualong One” nuclear reactor, squeezing out foreign designs, as it resumes a long-delayed nuclear program aimed at meeting its clean energy goals, government and industry officials said.

China, the world’s biggest energy consumer, was once seen as a “shop window” for big nuclear developers to show off new technologies, with Beijing embarking on a program to build plants based on designs from France, the United States, Russia and Canada.

Source: China goes all-in on home grown tech in push for nuclear dominance – Reuters

Microsoft turned down facial-recognition sales on human rights concerns | Reuters


Microsoft Corp recently rejected a California law enforcement agency’s request to install facial recognition technology in officers’ cars and body cameras due to human rights concerns, company President Brad Smith said on Tuesday.

Microsoft concluded it would lead to innocent women and minorities being disproportionately held for questioning because the artificial intelligence has been trained on mostly white and male pictures.

Source: Microsoft turned down facial-recognition sales on human rights concerns – Reuters