The FCC Vote on Net Neutrality Will Increase Transparency and Oversight |  US News


Many media outlets have said that the FCC is removing all rules, when in fact the FCC wants to strengthen the most important rule of all, transparency.

Under the new proposal, internet service providers, or ISPs, have to disclose information about their practices to consumers, entrepreneurs and the commission. This includes network management practices, performance and commercial terms of broadband internet access service “sufficient to enable consumers to make informed choices regarding the purchase and use of such services and entrepreneurs and other small businesses to develop, market, and maintain Internet offerings.”

These disclosures must be public and easily accessible. Information is the foundation of a market economy, competition and consumer protection. Transparent information is essential for consumers to make informed decisions.

Source: The FCC Vote on Net Neutrality Will Increase Transparency and Oversight | The Report: Opinion | US News

No, the American People Did Not Absolve Trump of Sexual Misconduct Charges | US News


In the matter of allegations of President Donald Trump’s sexual misconduct, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders really ought to leave the American people out of it.

Asked Monday in her regular briefing about calls for a congressional investigation and/or a presidential resignation in light of the women who have accused him of everything from ogling (teenagers no less) to groping and kissing, Sanders repeated Trump’s denials and then invoked no less an authority than the American public as grounds to end the discussion. “The people of this country, at a decisive election, supported President Trump, and we feel like these allegations have been answered through that process,” she said

There are several problems with this argument, perhaps the most obvious being that “the American people” did not support Trump’s election. The numbers are not new: Trump got 46 percent of the popular vote; or to put it another way, 54 percent of the voting portion of “the American people” wanted someone else to be president; and specifically, 48 percent voted for Hillary Clinton, who garnered 3 million more votes nationwide than did her opponent.

That makes for a truly novel definition of “overwhelming support.”

Source: No, the American People Did Not Absolve Trump of Sexual Misconduct Charges | The Report: Opinion | US News

The Alabama Senate Election Was Decided 100 Million Years Ago | WIRED


.. Or maybe, it was the ground itself—the literal soil underneath voters’ feet, which was once submerged underwater, leaving behind a uniquely fertile strip of land on which human beings committed unthinkable atrocities, the effects of which are still being felt today.

What? The Democratic National Committee didn’t mention that in its emails? Then, allow us to explain.

Historians and political scientists have long observed that the map of slavery in the antebellum South looks almost exactly like the map of Democratic counties in America …

Source: The Alabama Senate Election Was Decided 100 Million Years Ago | WIRED

Does Trump Want Peace in the Middle East? | Pacific Standard


“Recent history demonstrates that stoking global conflict is a staple of the Trump administration’s foreign policy, if they have one at all,” says Emran El-Badawi, a professor of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Houston.

“Within his first 10 months in office Trump has deliberately challenged North Korean president Kim Jong-un after that country’s latest nuclear weapons test; he breached the Iran Nuclear Deal on behalf of the U.S., by refusing to re-certify it a second time and then declared that country’s National Guard a terrorist group. … One of the only countries in support of Trump’s hawkish, and many would say racist, policies has been Israeli president Benjamin Netanyahu.”

Source: Does Trump Want Peace in the Middle East? – Pacific Standard

How Irish households are most at risk in Europe from ECB rate hike | Independent.ie


Irish householders and firms are most at risk of a looming interest rate hike by the European Central Bank compared to any other country in the EU, a leading Government think tank has warned.

The rate of growth in wages was four times faster in the period June 2016 to June this year, than the previous 12 months. It also warned it was unlikely that there were enough unemployed people to meet the future demands of the labor market.

Source: How Irish households are most at risk in Europe from ECB rate hike – Independent.ie

Brexit: The EU has been loving its life since Britain voted to leave | Quartz


The weeks after the UK referendum were nervy times for Brussels. Europe’s refugee crisis was raging, European economies were stagnant, and there were fears that Brexit-like referendums would spread across the continent. Far-right candidates threatened to win power in elections in France, Germany, and the Netherlands.

But none of those fears quite came to fruition.

Then came three big elections. In the Netherlands, Mark Rutte’s center-right government held off the extremist Geert Wilders. In France, the young, pro-European centrist Emmanuel Macron wiped the floor with the National Front’s Marine Le Pen.

Their optimism has also made the EU’s mandarins truly fed up with Brexit. While they want to move forward, London’s mixture of arrogance and incompetence in negotiating its departure is a constant irritant.

Source: Brexit: The EU has been loving its life since Britain voted to leave — Quartz

Eurozone WARS: France and Germany split on future of EU as Mercron cracks begin to appear | Express.co.uk


.. Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party, along with the Netherlands, Austria, Finland and a number of Baltic countries, want to see more fiscal discipline and stricter financial controls.

These countries are thought to be resentful that their own taxpayers were asked to bail out a host of Mediterranean countries whose financial shortfalls were largely due to the spendthrift habits of successive governments.

There is a growing wariness from Germany and its allies that Macron’s bid for further eurozone integration could be used as a source of cheap financial aid by poorer eurozone members.

Source: Eurozone WARS: France and Germany split on future of EU as Mercron cracks begin to appear | Politics | News | Express.co.uk

Factbox: Disney’s global footprint post-Fox deal


Fox would keep its news and business news divisions, its broadcast stations and Fox Sports, according to sources familiar with the details of the deal being sought by Disney.

That would leave Disney swallowing the bulk of one of the world’s biggest media conglomerates.

Following is an outline of the resources and assets of the united company if the deal goes through …

Source: Factbox: Disney’s global footprint post-Fox deal

India is buying world’s emptiest airport in its battle for territorial dominance with China | Business Insider India


India plans to buy the world’s emptiest airport in an effort to limit China’s influence in the Indian Ocean.

Designed to accommodate one million passengers per year, Mattala Rajapaksa International Airport – a vanity project by Sri Lanka’s former President Mahinda Rajapaksa that opened in 2013 – is a complete dud and receives just a dozen passengers a day.

Yet India is set to pay $300 million for a joint venture granting it a 40-year lease over the nearly 2,000-acre space in southern Sri Lanka that was once so empty it was used to store rice .

Source: India is buying world’s emptiest airport in its battle for territorial dominance with China | Business Insider India

Lockheed Martin may top Boeing in race to supply Canada jets


That would mark a reversal in Lockheed’s fortunes after Liberal leader Justin Trudeau campaigned in 2015 on a promise not to buy the firm’s F-35 stealth fighter.

Ottawa on Tuesday scrapped plans to buy 18 Boeing Super Hornets and made clear the company would not win a contract for 88 jets unless it dropped a trade challenge against Canadian planemaker Bombardier Inc (BBDb.TO).

Officials estimate the cost of the jets at between C$15 billion ($11.7 billion) and C$19 billion and say it is the biggest investment in the air force in 30 years.

Last week Boeing made clear it would not back down in its fight against Bombardier, which it accuses of trying to dump airliners on the U.S. market.

The firm may not even launch a bid for the 88 jets, the first of which are due to be delivered in 2025.

Source: Lockheed Martin may top Boeing in race to supply Canada jets: experts