8 Technologies We Owe to the Apollo Space Program | Design News


A lot of technologies ranging from consumer electronics to medical innovations all either got their start or their first major push thanks to work done by engineers, astronauts, and scientists working on the Apollo program.

Source: 8 Technologies We Owe to the Apollo Space Program | Design News

Retiring Knowledge Workers May Get Replaced with Technology | Design News

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Retiring Boomers are leaving manufacturing plants with a knowledge deficit.

The engineer who could smell a failing motor or hear a bum bearing is getting replaced by preventive maintenance tools run my younger workers who are digital natives. Automation tools are advancing to accommodate this change. More and more, emerging plant technology requires configuration rather than original programming. Young employees are stepping into the jobs of the future and becoming “robot masters” in the process.

Yet there is a skills gap between the retiring knowledge worker and the young engineer who is set to replace the Boomer’s training with technology. “We’re seeing a skills deficit.

Source: Retiring Knowledge Workers May Get Replaced with Technology | Design News

T-Mobile Reportedly Worried That Dish Is Actually a Trojan Horse for Cable | Light Reading

nullThere’s a new twist in the ongoing Sprint/T-Mobile soap opera, and it reportedly hinges on concerns that Dish Network will ink some kind of transaction with Sprint and T-Mobile only to be subsequently acquired by a cable company.

According to a number of reports citing CNBC, T-Mobile and its parent company Deutsche Telekom are concerned that if they agree to some kind of transaction with Dish Network, a cable company like Comcast or Charter will then acquire Dish and thereby gain access to Dish’s MVNO deal with T-Mobile.

Source: T-Mobile Reportedly Worried That Dish Is Actually a Trojan Horse for Cable | Light Reading

DARPA Summit Updates $1.5B Program | EE Times

nullResearchers from academia, government, and industry are meeting in Detroit this week for the second annual summit for the Electronics Resurgence Initiative (ERI).

The ERI program is spending $1.5 billion of U.S. federal funds over five years to drive the semiconductor industry forward at a time when traditional silicon scaling is showing diminishing returns.

It’s still early days for more than a dozen advanced research projects being discussed at the event. Organizers point to the caliber of companies taking part in the program as an indicator of progress.

Intel, GlobalFoundries, Nvidia, Qualcomm, and Xilinx are among active participants in the program.

Source: DARPA Summit Updates $1.5B Program | EE Times

Emerging Applications Could Transform GDDR Market | EE Times

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When you need something faster than DRAM but can’t justify high-bandwidth memory (HBM), GDDR is just right.

As an incumbent memory historically used primarily in graphics cards for high-end PCs, particularly those for gamers, the last couple of years have seen GDDR technology hit a “Goldilocks zone” of sorts with uptake in emerging use cases such as artificial intelligence (AI), autonomous vehicles, and 5G networking — all of which need speed and high performance.

Source: Emerging Applications Could Transform GDDR Market | EE Times

What the Japan-Korea Trade War Means to the World | EE Times


Based on the numbers, it would seem that the damage to Korean companies is greater in the cutback of fluorinated polyimide and photoresists.

However, I believe that the restrictions on hydrogen fluoride, on which Korea is the least dependent on Japan, poses the greatest threat to Korean companies. Further, I believe that these export controls will hobble not just Korean, but also Japanese companies.

The eventual backlash will hit the Japanese government and might undercut Japan’s competitiveness. In short, in my opinion, the Japanese government is digging its own grave.

The relationship between Japan and Korea will never be the same again.

Source: What the Japan-Korea Trade War Means to the World | EE Times

PCIe a Battlefield for Intel, Rivals | EE Times

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PCIe Generation 4 is just beginning to hit the market in processors and GPUs, yet many companies are already anticipating PCIe Gen 5 within a couple of years and the specification for PCIe Gen 6 is in development.

Amazingly enough, the PCI Special Interest Group (SIG) has set its goal to double data throughput in each of these generations, even as the industry pushes the limits of board and packaging technology. This is not an easy goal to achieve, but there’s enough commitment and optimism by the PCI SIG members to maintain this pace.

Source: PCIe a Battlefield for Intel, Rivals | EE Times

Apollo 11: One Giant Leap | EE Times

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The mission was Apollo 11. Neil Armstrong was first person to walk on the moon, followed by his crewmate Buzz Aldrin.

Michael Collins remained in the lunar orbiter, tantalizingly close, but never to get a chance to also set foot on Earth’s satellite. Part of our 50th anniversary package includes an appreciation of Collins, who did a job that had to be done., and wasn’t interested in celebrity.

But there’s only so long a guy that erudite, that funny, and that wise could stay out of the spotlight.

A list of all the articles is below.

Source: Apollo 11: One Giant Leap | EE Times

Interactive Map Shows All 21 Successful Moon Landings | Smithsonian


The most renowned moon landings are undoubtedly the six Apollo lunar touchdowns, carrying humans to another world for the first time (and still, the only time). However, robotic exploration of the lunar surface in the latter half of the 1960s played a crucial role for those crewed landings and the boot prints that followed. Today, robotics has advanced to the point that landers and rovers operated from Earth provide a capable and cost-effective way to explore the moon.

From research conducted by the Apollo missions, other successful moon landings, dozens of orbiters and powerful telescopes here at Earth, we know more about our one natural satellite than at any point in history. But there is still much to learn.

Source: Interactive Map Shows All 21 Successful Moon Landings | Science | Smithsonian

As U.S. ‘superstar’ cities thrive, weaker ones get left behind | Reuters


In the depths of the financial crisis, when the world was shunning debt and battening down for the worst, city officials here zagged in what seemed a preposterous direction and spent $600 million on a new convention center.

It is in many ways a positive story of how new winners can emerge even after a devastating recession. But it also represents a major fault line in the recovery that followed: Winning places like Nashville have won big, often for reasons that can’t obviously or quickly be replicated, while much of the rest of the country has struggled to stay even or slipped behind.

Source: As U.S. ‘superstar’ cities thrive, weaker ones get left behind – Reuters