We Are America’s Electric Cooperatives | America’s Electric Cooperatives


Millions of rural American families and businesses are stuck on the wrong side of the digital divide. And where no one else will provide the service, electric co-ops have found a way. Motivated by people, not profits, and the needs of their communities, electric co-ops are making rural broadband a reality.

Source: We Are America’s Electric Cooperatives – America’s Electric Cooperatives

We Make it Simple: How Honda Outsmarted Catalytic Converters


In the 1960s, Japan was facing the same air pollution problems as the U.S., and as in the U.S., car makers scrambled to find ways to meet the resulting government limits on vehicle emissions.

In response, Honda Motor Co. founder Soichiro Honda established the company’s Air Pollution Control Lab with a team of just 30 engineers to investigate emissions control systems. At the time, Honda was a motorcycle company that was only just dipping a toe in automotive waters and had no budget to develop costly new technologies to control pollution from its vehicles.

Source: We Make it Simple: How Honda Outsmarted Catalytic Converters

Space Force top priority for monitoring heavens: Seeing better the data it has | Breaking Defense


Improving integration and use of sensor data already available to create a full picture of what is happening in the heavens is one of the biggest challenges faced today by the Space Force’s newly named 18th Space Defense Squadron, according to its commander, Lt. Col. Matt Lintker.

“Right now, if I had to prioritize, I prioritize to be doing better with the data I have,” he told C4ISRNet’s annual conference today — noting that this includes data from commercial partners monitoring space traffic as well as data from the radar and telescopes part of the military’s Space Surveillance Network (SSN).

Source: Space Force top priority for monitoring heavens: Seeing better the data it has – Breaking Defense

3D Printing and Bacteria for Solar Harvesting | EE Times Europe


A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge in the U.K., led by Jenny Zhang from the Yusuf Hamied Department of Chemistry, successfully demonstrated the use of bacteria and photosynthesis for solar-based energy harvesting.

When we think of energy-harvesting options, the obvious possibilities that come to mind are likely solar and photovoltaics, vibration and piezoelectric transducers, wind and water turbines, or perhaps thermal via thermocouples.

But why be limited to such conventional thinking? It turns out there are other substances that can harvest energy, as the research team at the University of Cambridge has shown. They combined solar energy (those pre-packaged pure energy bundles) with a specialized bacteria to generate small, but useful, amounts of electricity.

Source: 3D Printing and Bacteria for Solar Harvesting – EE Times Europe

Power struggle: How the US Army is tackling the logistics of battlefield electricity


In generations past, infantry officers’ primary needs were ammunition, an extra pair of dry socks and enough water in the field.

But soldiers today need vast stores of power just to manage daily operations, from the batteries that power the Samsung-based Nett Warrior system that connects soldiers to the electricity that keeps command posts and operations centers running.

Those needs are set to grow within the next decade as the Army moves toward using electric vehicles on the battlefield and weighs a variety of power sources for its facilities and bases. After all, the Army’s new climate strategy imagines a battlefield that depends less on fuel and more on electricity.

It envisions the service fielding hybrid electric tactical vehicles by 2035 and moving to all-electric tactical vehicles by 2050.

Source: Power struggle: How the US Army is tackling the logistics of battlefield electricity

EETimes | What Might a $10B Fusion R&D Initiative Look Like?


This article explores how a government or foundation could potentially resolve climate change with a $10B sized R&D program that accelerates the development of fusion power. We refer to it as “Commercial Fusion Now” (CFN), and the goal would be to produce commercial fusion this decade. We define “commercial fusion” as creating electricity at a cost comparable to electricity made with natural gas or coal. This would require a fusion reactor to produce more electricity than it consumes upon demand, reliably, and at low cost.

Currently, commercial fusion is not expected until the 2030’s or 2040’s. However, with more funding, it could perhaps appear sooner. Nations under great pressure sometimes spend money to bring a technology to market quickly. For example, the United States commercialized ‘space’ in the 2000s, and the Covid vaccine development in 2020. Global decarbonization will cost upwards of trillions of dollars. Therefore, it is reasonable to spend billions of dollars to accelerate commercial fusion.

Source: EETimes – What Might a $10B Fusion R&D Initiative Look Like?

EETimes | What Drives Autonomous Vehicles?


The autonomous vehicle (AV) industry continues to evolve across many aspects: technologies, use cases, safety standards, safety legislation, and many others. This column explores what key factors are driving and shaping the AV industry.

The figure helps contextualize the current AV landscape by summarizing some of the key SAE definitions, hardware and software technologies, legislations, and regulations currently shaping the AV industry.

Source: EETimes – What Drives Autonomous Vehicles?

EETimes | First Light Achieves Fusion Energy


First Light Fusion (First Light) has confirmed that it has achieved fusion. The U.K. Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) independently validated the achievement.

The fusion achieved by the Oxford University fusion spin–out is the first to use projectile technology. The goal of First Light is to tackle the fusion challenge with a machine that is as simple as possible. According to scientists, projectile technology is a revolutionary inertial method that should be more energy–efficient and less expensive.

Source: EETimes – First Light Achieves Fusion Energy

NOAA: Methane levels skyrocketed in 2021, as carbon dioxide spiked too


For the second straight year, scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are reporting a record increase in the level of methane in the atmosphere, along with a significant jump in carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.

Why it matters: These are the two most important greenhouse gases, with CO2 lasting in the air for centuries to millennia, and methane, which is a stronger warming agent, exerting its warming influence on the timescale of about a decade.

Source: NOAA: Methane levels skyrocketed in 2021, as carbon dioxide spiked too

Calif. sprints to install batteries but can’t find parts | E&E News


California is racing to add batteries to its electric grid in an attempt to prevent blackouts, cut greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for the closure of the state’s only nuclear power plant in 2025.

A plan finalized by state regulators last month calls for almost quintupling California’s storage capacity over the next four years.

But the Golden State faces significant hurdles that could scramble its plans. Shipping bottlenecks have delayed construction of new projects. Demand for raw materials used in lithium-ion batteries, which account for the vast majority of utility-scale projects, outstrips supply. And permitting and connecting all those new batteries to the grid is a difficult puzzle itself.

Source: Calif. sprints to install batteries but can’t find parts – E&E News