Sculpture of Smiling Satan Causes Controversy in Spain | Time


Segovia, a city in central Spain, is divided over plans to install the bronze statue portraying the devil grinning and taking a selfie, the BBC reports.

The effigy alludes to a local folktale, which says the city’s Roman-era aqueduct was built by the devil in exchange for a young girl’s soul. (She ended up getting it back, the story goes.)

The two-tiered structure, built around the year 50 and spanning half a mile, is listed along with the old town center as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Source: Sculpture of Smiling Satan Causes Controversy in Spain | Time

Major Facebook Users Are Worse At Making Decisions | GovExec.com


The findings, which appear in the Journal of Behavior Addictions, are the first to examine the relationship between social media use and risky decision-making capabilities.

“Decision making is oftentimes compromised in individuals with substance use disorders. They sometimes fail to learn from their mistakes and continue down a path of negative outcomes,” Dar Meshi says.

“But no one previously looked at this behavior as it relates to excessive social media users, so we investigated this possible parallel between excessive social media users and substance abusers. While we didn’t test for the cause of poor decision-making, we tested for its correlation with problematic social media use.”

Source: Major Facebook Users Are Worse At Making Decisions – Management Matters – Management – GovExec.com

Asteroids, gamma rays, supervolcanoes: how nature could wipe out humanity | Vox


An asteroid killed the dinosaurs. Could that happen to us?

What about a supervolcanic eruption blocking out the sun?

Or a solar flare or nearby supernova event?

Anders Sandberg is a researcher at Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute, where he writes about existential risks — dangers that threaten the continued survival of our species. Existential risks can be either man-made (like nuclear war, artificial intelligence, or bioengineering) or naturally occurring, like the asteroid that took down the dinosaurs.

In a 2018 paper, “Human Extinction From Natural Hazard Events,” Sandberg takes a look at the latter category.

So how likely are we to die of natural hazards, if we manage not to destroy ourselves with man-made ones?

Source: Asteroids, gamma rays, supervolcanoes: how nature could wipe out humanity – Vox

Why The Agile Workplace Must Include AI And Humans


What should the workforce of the future look like?

Unlike today’s model, it will be made up of three distinct types of “workers”: traditional (full- and part-time), agile (gig, contract, project-based) and artificial intelligence (automation technology).

I believe, within the next few years, about 40% of a business’s workforce should consist of a mix of agile and AI workers.

Source: Why The Agile Workplace Must Include AI And Humans

What Einstein meant by ‘God does not play dice’ | Aeon Ideas


Einstein’s was a God of philosophy, not religion.

When asked many years later whether he believed in God, he replied: ‘I believe in Spinoza’s God, who reveals himself in the lawful harmony of all that exists, but not in a God who concerns himself with the fate and the doings of mankind.’ Baruch Spinoza, a contemporary of Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz, had conceived of God as identical with nature.

For this, he was considered a dangerous heretic, and was excommunicated from the Jewish community in Amsterdam.

Source: What Einstein meant by ‘God does not play dice’ | Aeon Ideas

Fight Climate Change in Your Own Garden


During World War I, Americans were encouraged to do their part in the war effort by planting, fertilizing, harvesting and storing their own fruits and vegetables.

The food would go to allies in Europe, where there was a food crisis. These so-called “victory gardens” declined when WWI ended but resurged during World War II.

By 1944, nearly 20 million victory gardens produced about 8 million tons of food.

Today, the nonprofit Green America is trying to bring back victory gardens as a way to fight climate change.

Source: Fight Climate Change in Your Own Garden

The Cleaners documentary, life as Facebook content moderator


“My mom always told me, if I don’t study well, I’ll end up as a scavenger. All they do is pick up garbage. They rely on garbage. It’s the only livelihood they know.”

It’s an insight that a young Filipino woman makes when realizing that her own job in technology is very much the same thing. Her position: Content moderator, one of perhaps thousands of human beings who scan, assess, and delete media of everything from beheadings to child pornography uploaded to services like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter each day.

Her quota? 25,000 photos a day. Her rules? Dictated by corporations–but often vague at best.

Source: The Cleaners documentary, life as Facebook content moderator

Guide to starting a new business for artists and designers


Over the years, my consulting work has revealed a pattern for the building blocks of a successful business.

If you’re considering starting a new venture or taking your work to the next level, but feel unsure about the steps, I hope this guide will get you going.

Source: Guide to starting a new business for artists and designers

These startups make women’s clothing with pockets


Three years ago, Evelyn Frison set out to re-engineer professional women’s pants.

She wasn’t exactly the person you’d expect to take on this task: She had no background in fashion design, having studied journalism in college and pursued a career in marketing. But she had spent most of her adult life lamenting how terrible office-appropriate pants were.

She had identified all of their problems: They often stretched out at the knees and bottom. They wrinkled and stained easily. But one thing bothered her more than anything else.

“I hate how so many women’s pants don’t have real pockets,” Frison says.

“Where are we supposed to put our keys? Our cards? Our phones? And what on earth is the purpose of a fake pocket that is sewn shut?”

Source: These startups make women’s clothing with pockets

These Are The Skills To Learn For The Future Of Work, According To The World Economic Forum | GovExec.com


When we talk about the future of work, we often talk about job titles as a proxy for where the economy is heading. Machinists and truck drivers are out, robotics programmers and project managers are in.

But as job titles get more and more nebulous (what is it that project managers do anyway?) a new report from the World Economic Forum suggests that we ought to also look at skills.

Skills are actionable. They can guide workers toward understanding their unique value, where they are deficient, and what they want to learn. Especially as more of the workforce shifts toward freelancers, it will be skills—not job titles—that will help workers differentiate themselves.

Source: These Are The Skills To Learn For The Future Of Work, According To The World Economic Forum – Management Matters – Management – GovExec.com