What happened when I made my students turn off their phones | Aeon Ideas

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YONDR makes special pouches that keep audiences from using their phones at shows.

You silence your phone, slide it into the pouch, aYONDR makes special pouches that keep audiences from using their phones at shows. You silence your phone, slide it into the pouch, and lock it at the top. After the performance, or if access is necessary before then, you can unlock the case in the lobby by touching the lock to a metal base, similar to anti-theft tags on clothing.

Performers such as Dave Chappelle and Alicia Keys have used YONDR – whose motto is ‘Be here now’ – to curtail unsanctioned recordings and, when they look into the crowd, they see faces, not phones.

Source: What happened when I made my students turn off their phones | Aeon Ideas

The Passenger Economy: Challenges Ahead | Embedded Intel® Solutions


Once people cease to drive, what do they do? A new market will open up, called the “Passenger Economy,” a term coined by Intel® CEO Brian Krzanich.

Different applications, markets, and businesses can shoot out of this inflection point in how we carry out our lives. Consumer services such as entertainment, advertising, and personal or financial services might be carried out inside autonomous vehicles as people travel to work.

Intel’s Katherine (Kathy) Winter, Vice President and General Manager of the Automated Driving Division, deliberates a passenger economy and the new markets it will incite. “It’s probably the smaller piece right now, but mostly because we can’t imagine what it is yet,” she states. Winter suggests that this portion of the passenger economy would include “the new services that a person in an [autonomous] vehicle could be consuming; something [like] entertainment, education, advertising, things like that.”

Source: The Passenger Economy: Challenges Ahead | Embedded Intel® Solutions

First Ever 3D Printed Café Opens


Last month, Cucuyo, a mobile café, opened just outside of the Miami-based art museum as the first ever 3D printed structure of its size.

The café is made of 700-pounds of stainless steel and includes a front counter, back counter and door. The final assembled piece stands at 20 feet long, nine feet high and 12 feet wide with an advanced counter design, electrical configuration and plumbing inside of the structure.

Source: First Ever 3D Printed Café Opens

Chicago breaks ground on elevated pedestrian trail | Smart Cities Dive

  • Last Wednesday, Chicago broke ground on an elevated bike and pedestrian trail that will connect North Side neighborhoods to three parks and other recreational activities, according to a press release from Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office.
  • The 312 RiverRun path will be 16 feet wide so that cyclists, runners and others can use it at the same time, and 18 feet high to allow for boat traffic underneath. The city is touting the project as safe because it does not require users to cross major streets.
  • The project is supported by local, state and federal funding and is part of Emanuel’s goal of creating a city river trail system.

Source: Chicago breaks ground on elevated pedestrian trail | Smart Cities Dive

How to Get Into Vivos Group’s Bomb Shelter Bunkers


“Now people are worried that Trump won’t back down if someone pushes him into a war.”

But for those wanting membership in an underground community bunker built by Vivos Group — say, one of the 575 converted bomb-storage bunkers in South Dakota, or a shared, luxe, 80-person Cold War–era bunker in Indiana that will sustain life inside for at least a year — money isn’t enough.

You must convince a selection committee that you’re a worthy entrant to the end-of-days Noah’s Ark.

Source: How to Get Into Vivos Group’s Bomb Shelter Bunkers

A new VAT system for Europe


According to the European Commission, over €150bn of VAT is lost every year, meaning that EU member states miss out on revenue that could be used for schools, roads and healthcare.

Of this, around €50bn (€100 per EU citizen each year) is estimated to be due to cross-border VAT fraud. This money can be used to finance criminal organizations, including terrorism. It is estimated that this sum would be reduced by 80% thanks to the proposed reform.

Source: A new VAT system for Europe

Will new drugs mean the rich live to 120 and the poor die at 60? | Aeon Essays


The life expectancy gap between the affluent and the poor and working class in the US, for instance, now clocks in at 12.2 years. College-educated white men can expect to live to age 80, while counterparts without a high-school diploma die by age 67.

White women with a college degree have a life expectancy of nearly 84, compared with uneducated women, who live to 73.

And these disparities are widening. This is just a harbinger of things to come.

We should discuss the issue now, because we are close to delivering a true fountain of youth that could potentially extend our productive lifespan into our hundreds – it’s no longer the stuff of science fiction.

Source: Will new drugs mean the rich live to 120 and the poor die at 60? | Aeon Essays

Here’s How Lakes Could Power the Nation


“By controlling evaporation, we can store and control the power output, allowing us to potentially provide reliable energy on demand without needing batteries and other energy storage methods.”

The machine, developed by Ozgur Sahin‘s lab, controls humidity with shutters that open and close, prompting the spore-coated plastic strips to expand and contract. “When the shutters are closed, evaporation from the water surface raises the humidity level below the shutters, causing spore-coated strips to elongate,” he explained. “The movement of the strip opens the shutters, which reduces humidity levels by letting moisture out. The cycle reaches completion when spore-coated strips shorten and close the shutters. Because the process is cyclical, the spore-coated strips repeatedly elongate and shorten.”

The moving end of the strips is connected to a generator, which produces the electricity.

Source: Here’s How Lakes Could Power the Nation

Is there a single food that you can survive on forever? | Popular Science


First and foremost, it’s not a good idea to only eat one kind of food. To survive, we need 20 amino acids—of which nine are essential, meaning we can’t make them ourselves and must get them from food—as well as a plethora of minerals and vitamins. (And, obviously, we need water in addition to food to keep our cells hydrated so they don’t wither and stop functioning.)

Throughout history we’ve often combined foods, like rice and beans, yogurt and nuts, and even macaroni and cheese to a certain extent, in an attempt, or by accident, to intake the proper balance of nutrients that you usually can’t attain from eating a single food item. But in times of famine, fasting, or strange double-dog-dares, there are a couple of foods a human could survive on…at least for awhile.

The potato is one good example.

Source: Is there a single food that you can survive on forever? | Popular Science

Do IoT Applications Need Intelligent Sensors? | Design News

My personal opinion is that the IoT has been dominated by a discussion of the cloud – it’s been all about analytics and software companies. And so we see a lot of people doing proof of concept, and they have great ideas, but they don’t really know what to do with them.

And maybe the data isn’t good enough to provide value to the end customer.

So right now, you’ve got to determine what you want to achieve with an IoT system, and then work backward to determine what kind of system you really want.

Source: Do IoT Applications Need Intelligent Sensors? | Design News