Startup Space Spotlight: OSS Takes Inspiration from Origami | Via Satellite

I launched the company after realizing the fact that deployable structures were and are often a neglected area of a spacecraft. It was an area ripe for innovation.

For instance, the market for large deployable reflectors is dominated by two large incumbents that come from defense backgrounds. Product offerings tend to be expensive with long lead times and are characterized by incremental improvements, not disruptive “NewSpace” developments.

I realized that we could bring about a step change by using innovative materials and a new approach to product build and validation.

Source: Startup Space Spotlight: OSS Takes Inspiration from Origami – Via Satellite –

‘Parts Unknown’ Star Anthony Bourdain’s Best Ways to Travel | Money


Bourdain is on a mission to change how we see and experience the world. Skip the tourist traps. Avoid the lines. And please, please, never book a prepackaged tour.

His alternative? Get real when you travel. When the 61-year-old former chef explores a new place, he’s not stressing about where to eat or which museums to hit up. He’s far more interested in getting a sense of the rhythms and smells and flavors of a place, a task that requires patience and a willingness to explore. Going rogue.

Source: ‘Parts Unknown’ Star Anthony Bourdain’s Best Ways to Travel | Money

Telecommuting Is Growing, But Still Not Unanimously Embraced | US News


The Flexjobs.com report said the industries offering the greatest possibilities to work remotely included technology and mathematics, the military, art and design, entertainment, sports, media, personal care and financial services.

Experts cite a couple of reasons why telecommuting is becoming more common in some industries: a more reliable internet connectivity and new management practices dictated by millennials and how they work.

Among the advantages that companies cite for remote work are cost savings in the absence of a work space, more focused and productive employees, and better work retention.

Additionally, in 2015, figures showed that U.S. employers had saved up to $44 billion with the existing almost 4 million telecommuters (working half time or more), the Flexjobs.com report said.

Source: Telecommuting Is Growing, But Still Not Unanimously Embraced | Best Countries | US News

Confabulation: why telling ourselves stories makes us feel ok | Aeon Ideas


In our everyday lives, we often explain our choices earnestly, even if we don’t know some of the facts relevant to the reason we made those choices. When we offer an explanation, we propose some plausible argument for choosing the way we did.

‘Confabulation’ comes from the Latin fabula (‘story’) which can be either a historical account or a fairytale. When we confabulate, we tell a story that is fictional, while believing that it is a true story.

As we are not aware that our story is fictional, this is very different from a lie: we have no intention to deceive. So in confabulation there is a mismatch between what we aim to do (tell a true story) and what we end up doing (tell a fictional story).

Source: Confabulation: why telling ourselves stories makes us feel ok | Aeon Ideas

Uber and Waymo Settle Autonomous Driving Tech Lawsuit for $245 Million | WIRED


The suit ends instead with what looks like an amicable détente, with a heavy dose of Uber contrition thrown in for good measure.

The ride-hail company has committed to a legally binding agreement that they will not use Waymo hardware or software intellectual property in their own self-driving-car technology. (This lawsuit only concerned the hardware, lidar-focused portion of Waymo’s trade secret theft allegations; another trial, on software, was meant to come later.)

Source: Uber and Waymo Settle Autonomous Driving Tech Lawsuit for $245 Million | WIRED

The Big Question in Waymo v. Uber: What on Earth Is a Trade Secret, Anyway? | WIRED

If someone successfully files for a patent with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, they get a monetary prize. For a company in the business of breaking new technological ground, this makes sense: Invent a thing, win an award!

.. “There are eight trade secrets in this case, just eight,” Gonzalez said. “Tell the jury, who are the people who got bonuses for these eight things that are supposedly great ideas?”

There isn’t a program like that, Dimitri Dolgov responded.

Source: The Big Question in Waymo v. Uber: What on Earth Is a Trade Secret, Anyway? | WIRED

Can DHS purchase innovation? | FCW


Everyone wants more innovation at federal agencies. Despite a storied history of funding and developing new technologies like the microchip and the Internet, the federal government still carries around a reputation as an innovation killer.

Barry West, senior accountable officer for risk management at DHS, cited events like the reverse industry day and the Procurement Innovation Lab, which is designed to lower barriers of entry and create an experimental environment for non-traditional contractors, as examples of the ways DHS has attempted to embrace and foster innovation in recent years.

However, he said direct outreach and engagement with procurement officials was still the best way to communicate industry needs when project or RFP requirements appear too restrictive.

Source: Can DHS purchase innovation? — FCW

Davos Of The Many For The Few

.. In other words, rather than providing solutions, the ‘Davos method’ plays a subtler role of changing the social norm by pressurizing the elites to be agents of the change the world needs. This subtle yet overlooked ‘Davos effect’ on the elites’ mind-set is incremental and transformational of the Zeitgeist.

The most powerful illustration of the Davos effect is today’s restless hunger for impact among world business leaders.

Despite being accompanied by some inevitable bling-bling, the talk-in-town is no longer about who is the richest guy in the room, but the one who has saved – or improved – more lives. That’s what Davos is good at, but nobody gives credit for.

Source: Davos Of The Many For The Few

We need to listen to our future citizens. Here’s how to tune in | Aeon Essays


The asymmetry between past and future is more than unfair.

Our ancestors are beyond harm; they cannot know if we disappoint them. Yet the political decisions we make today will do more than just determine the burdens of citizenship for our grandchildren.

They also concern existential dangers such as the likelihood of pandemics and environmental collapse. Without a presence in our political system, the plight of future citizens who might suffer or gain from our present political decisions cannot be properly weighed. We need to give them a voice.

Source: We need to listen to our future citizens. Here’s how to tune in | Aeon Essays

On Second Thought, You Should Maybe Talk Less In Meetings


Research on creativity suggests that the people who have the most ideas are also most likely to have the best ideas.

So it’s a good idea to generate a lot of ideas while you’re in a meeting–at least inside your own head to start with. But before deciding to contribute your latest thought in the meeting, write it down. Take a look at it, and decide whether you think it’s one of the best you’ve come up with.

If so, go on and share it! Then you can keep your others in reserve in case the group isn’t happy with the options they have so far.

Source: On Second Thought, You Should Maybe Talk Less In Meetings