Children need digital mentorship, not WHO’s restrictions on screen time


.. don’t blame the media for the mischaracterization. It’s WHO itself that chose to give an oddly disproportionate amount of attention to “sedentary screen time,” a category the organization defines as: “Time spent passively watching screen-based entertainment.”

Throughout the new guidelines, WHO presents “sedentary screen time” as one of three main categories, along with “physical activity” and “good quality” sleep.

These are represented with large colorful graphics as shown above, implying that screen time limits are equally as important to early childhood wellbeing as sleep and exercise.

Of course, that’s not true, not even by the guidelines’ standards.

Source: Children need digital mentorship, not WHO’s restrictions on screen time

Forget about artificial intelligence, extended intelligence is the future

null
.. They have found a perfect partner in digital computation, a seemingly knowable, controllable, machine-based system of thinking and creating that is rapidly increasing in its ability to harness and process complexity and, in the process, bestowing wealth and power on those who have mastered it.

In Silicon Valley, the combination of groupthink and the financial success of this cult of technology has created a feedback loop, lacking in self-regulation (although #techwontbuild, #metoo and #timesup are forcing some reflection).

On an S-curve or a bell curve, the beginning of the slope looks a lot like an exponential curve. According to systems-dynamics people, however, an exponential curve shows a positive feedback curve without limits, self-reinforcing and dangerous.

Source: Forget about artificial intelligence, extended intelligence is the future

America’s retirement system is a mess. This new legislation can help


The American retirement system is in urgent need of repair. Projections show that around half of all American households are not saving enough for retirement. Many Americans don’t have access to saving plans at work, and those who are saving need better options for turning their wealth into security.

Policymakers are taking action. The Senate recently introduced the Retirement Enhancement and Savings Act (RESA) and the House Ways and Means Committee passed the Setting Every Community up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act.

These bills both work to improve the issues with today’s retirement policy.

Source: America’s retirement system is a mess. This new legislation can help

Sri Lanka Bombings: What We Know | Council on Foreign Relations


Historically, even a single successful suicide bombing requires a logistical “tail” involving many people, including recruiters to radicalize and maintain the resolve of the bomber-martyrs, skilled bomb makers, and operatives to surveil targets.

This is a formidable undertaking generally only accomplished by people with considerable expertise and an organizational network.

Source: Sri Lanka Bombings: What We Know | Council on Foreign Relations

Quebec figured out a simple way to get people to donate more to charity | Vox


Did the prospect of an immediate tax deduction make donors more generous?

According to a study by economists Ross Hickey, Bradley Minaker, and Abigail Payne, which was published last month in Canada’s National Tax Journal, it did.

“Quebec tax payers gave more than taxpayers in the rest of Canada during this period,” the study concludes. More people donated more money, and the people who donated gave more.

Overall, the authors found that the opportunity to get a tax deduction sooner increased all donations (not just to earthquake relief) by 9 percent.

Source: Quebec figured out a simple way to get people to donate more to charity – Vox

What EU innovation policy can learn from professional cycling | EURACTIV.com


The theory of marginal gains is just as applicable in delivering ambitious research and innovation missions as it is in performance sports.

It involves breaking a big goal into small parts and learning how to improve on each element. Huge improvements in performance can be achieved when each of the individual improvements are put together. In cycling, the elements include bike set-up, clothing, diet, training regime and even the quality of the mattresses on the athlete’s beds.

If the objective is to deliver 100 carbon-neutral cities, then the important elements relate to the ability to get energy consumers to adopt new technologies and behaviors. Key issues might involve the way the choices are presented, the consumer protection regime, the ability to continually update technology, peer pressure and the financial deal. There are also likely to be many important dimensions that are not yet apparent.

The key point is that there must be a ‘guiding hand’ that identifies the aspects that need exploring, processes the learning, locks in improvements and moves on the next round of questions and further refinements.

Source: What EU innovation policy can learn from professional cycling – EURACTIV.com

10 Shields That Get the Most Out of the Arduino | EE Times


The Arduino open-source development board is an immensely popular platform for engineers and makers to prototype their projects quickly.

It’s success, and versatility is driven by its community who have used it to drive home automation, power robotics, augment reality, and a host of other projects.

While on its own, the Arduino is an excellent tool for any project, but pairing it with a Shield expands its capabilities and raises the platform to a new level.

In this roundup, we will take a look at some of the more useful Shields that can turn an ordinary project into an excellent one.

Source: 10 Shields That Get the Most Out of the Arduino | EE Times

5 Paradoxes of an Innovation Culture | Nextgov


A recent trend has been to set up an innovation office to serve as a catalyst for new ideas. These offices can be helpful starting points and an inspiration to employees across an organization.

However, most leaders want to create a culture of innovation across their entire workforce, not just in an elite subset of employees.

Harvard professor Gary Pisano has studied what it takes to create an innovation culture in dozens of companies across the world and in a recent Harvard Business Review article he observes that “innovative cultures are seen as desirable . . . [but] are hard to create and sustain.” He says five characteristics exemplify an “innovation culture” in organizations:

  • A tolerance for failure
  • A willingness to experiment
  • Provides psychological safety
  • Is highly collaborative
  • Is nonhierarchical

Source: 5 Paradoxes of an Innovation Culture – Nextgov

Low Cost DIY Robotics Platform Allows Mechatronics Development | Design News


Mechatronics is an interdisciplinary field consisting of electrical-electronics, electromechanical. mechanical systems, and embedded software.

Entry into exploring mechatronics can be cost prohibitive when purchasing a development board and systems accessories. Also, inventories of such development platforms may be low or discontinued from the manufacturer or associated distributor.

Crickit is a Creative Interactive Construction Kit developed by founder of Adafruit Industries Limor Fried for the rapid development of robotics.

The Crickit allows engineers, students, and makers the ability to build and test robots using materials like paper, wood, plastics, and metals.

Source: Low Cost DIY Robotics Platform Allows Mechatronics Development | Design News

Spaceflight Might Increase Cancer Risk for Astronauts


As space organizations like NASA become more ambitious with exploration plans, additional studies are needed to see what the long-term health impact of spaceflight is on humans.

A research team led by University of Arizona scientists has now found that long-term spaceflights influence certain cells found in the immune system called natural killer cells (NK-cells)—white blood cells that kill cancerous cells in the body and prevent older viruses from reactivating.

Source: Spaceflight Might Increase Cancer Risk for Astronauts