Huawei CEO: EU doing a ‘great job’ in cybersecurity | EURACTIV.com

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Amid growing pressure from the US on European governments to reject Chinese tech firms, Huawei’s rotating CEO Ken Hu said on Tuesday (16 April) that the EU was doing “a great job” on cybersecurity.

In a keynote speech during its annual analyst summit in Shenzhen, where the company is based, Hu’s words were seen as a signal of the importance given by the company to European regulators. EURACTIV.com was invited to the summit.

Hu mentioned the cybersecurity center opened in Brussels in early March in order to increase the transparency of the work done in this field and the cooperation with stakeholders and European regulators.

Source: Huawei CEO: EU doing a ‘great job’ in cybersecurity – EURACTIV.com

‘We are talking about breaking monopolies like Facebook,’ says Barley, who tops SPD’s EU election list | EURACTIV.com

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In an interview with our partner DerTagesspiegel, German Justice Minister Katarina Barley explains why she wants digital firms to share their collected data with the public, and to limit the power of companies such as Facebook and Amazon.

Because, in addition to Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, who is actually also responsible for data security, I keep an eye, from the consumer’s point of view, on what happens to their data. This is very relevant to the health sector because data in that field is one of the most personal.

There needs to be a guarantee for security, more so than in any other area. This applies not only to how data is being processed and stored, but also to how it can later be used by the research sector in an anonymised and pseudonymised form.

Source: ‘We are talking about breaking monopolies like Facebook,’ says Barley, who tops SPD’s EU election list – EURACTIV.com

A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G | Defense One


Bottom line: Huawei leads the world in the ability to rapidly produce cheap telecom hardware (as well as the underlying software.) Recent reports, including one from NATO, state it plainly. It’s one reason why European countries, including U.S. allies like Germany and the U.K., have been reluctant to ban tech from Huawei outright, even in the face of heavy U.S. pressure.

But — quietly — many European countries like the U.K. and France actually are banning Huawei’s 5G tech in part by effectively quarantining it away from vital parts of infrastructure, or military and intelligence activities, according to James Lewis, senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“They don’t let Huawei near their sensitive intelligence facilities, their sensitive military facilities,” said Lewis.

Source: A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G – Defense One

National security 2019 to 2020: Australia government budget bolsters cyber security


In an attempt to protect government IT systems against targeted attacks and enable quick responses in the event of incidents, the Australia Cyber Security Center will deliver intelligence, cyber security and offensive operations in support of the Australian Government and Australian Defense Force (ADF).

The government will invest in the creation of cyber security ‘SPRINT teams’ and a Cyber Security Response Fund, according to a joint statement from the minister of defense, Christopher Pyne and minister of defense industry, Senator Linda Reynolds.

Source: National security 2019 to 2020: Australia government budget bolsters cyber security

Elite U.S. school MIT cuts ties with Chinese tech firms Huawei, ZTE | Reuters


The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has severed ties with Huawei Technologies and ZTE Corp as U.S. authorities investigate the Chinese firms for alleged sanctions violations, it said on Wednesday.

MIT is the latest top U.S. education institution to unplug telecom equipment made by Huawei and other Chinese companies to avoid losing federal funding.

“MIT is not accepting new engagements or renewing existing ones with Huawei and ZTE or their respective subsidiaries due to federal investigations regarding violations of sanction restrictions,” Maria Zuber, its vice president for research, said bit.ly/2K528XI in a letter on its website.

Collaborations with China, Russia and Saudi Arabia would face additional administrative review procedures, Zuber added.

Source: Elite U.S. school MIT cuts ties with Chinese tech firms Huawei, ZTE | Reuters

Five Defense Firms Join Supply Chain Cybersecurity Task Force | ExecutiveBiz

The Defense Industrial Base Sector Coordinating Council has named BAE Systems, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon as founding members of a task force that aims to protect controlled unclassified information across the supply chain.

The Supply Chain Cybersecurity Industry Task Force, led by Lockheed Chief Information Security Officer Mike Gordon, represents a collaboration among defense companies to share data and increase resilience of the industrial complex, DIB SCC said Wednesday.

“Our objective is to help identify and implement adversarial-focused solutions that enhance the cyber posture of companies throughout the multi-tier supply chain,” said Gordon.

Source: Five Defense Firms Join Supply Chain Cybersecurity Task Force | ExecutiveBiz

UK identifies fresh Huawei risks to telecom networks | EURACTIV.com


Britain has identified “significant” issues in Chinese giant Huawei’s engineering processes that pose “new risks” for the nation’s telecommunications, a government report found Thursday (March 28).

“Further significant technical issues have been identified in Huawei’s engineering processes, leading to new risks in the UK telecommunications networks,” read annual findings from the government’s Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) oversight board.

HCSEC stressed that it “does not believe that the defects identified are a result of Chinese state interference.”

However, the board added that “no material progress has been made by Huawei in the remediation of the issues reported last year.”

And it concluded: “Overall, the oversight board can only provide limited assurance that all risks to UK national security from Huawei’s involvement in the UK’s critical networks can be sufficiently mitigated long-term.”

HCSEC was formed in 2010 to mitigate perceived risks arising from the involvement of Huawei in critical national infrastructure.

The government-led board includes officials from Britain’s GCHQ cybersecurity agency as well as a senior Huawei executive and representatives from the UK telecommunications sector.

Source: UK identifies fresh Huawei risks to telecom networks – EURACTIV.com

It’s Time To Make Data Strategic For Our Navy | Nextgov


Our military is in a high-stakes race to harness the power of data, a revolution that may make previous leaps in military technology—think radar, nuclear power, or space—seem trifling in comparison.

To fully seize these opportunities before our adversaries do, we need to look less at the technologies we covet and more in the mirror about our own data structures and culture.

Yes, we are already finding new ways to inform and accelerate processes so we can increase the pace and transparency of decision making and reduce the cost of generating and operating our forces.

Source: It’s Time To Make Data Strategic For Our Navy – Nextgov

Installing Chinese 5G Gear is Dangerous—and Probably Inevitable: NATO Center Report | Nextgov


Cheap Chinese 5G technology isn’t all that cheap when you factor in the government time and resources needed to make it safe—or at least safer—to use, a new NATO Center of Excellence report says.

That’s the warning from a new report by the NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence, or CCDCOE, which notes the considerable risks of importing next-generation telecom equipment from Chinese hardware and software maker Huawei.

Acknowledging that alliance governments are unlikely to issue the “blanket bans” sought by U.S. officials, the report recommends instead a lot more government supervision of what companies like Huawei are building.

U.S. Defense Undersecretary Ellen Lord and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joe Dunford have highlighted the risk of Chinese-made 5G equipment, while Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said that the United States would have a hard time “partnering” with countries that import it.

“If that equipment is co-located where we have important American systems, it makes it more difficult for us to partner alongside them” Pompeo said in February.

U.S. lawmakers have expressed concern about Huawei and its opaque relationship to the Chinese military since at least 2012.

Source: Installing Chinese 5G Gear is Dangerous—and Probably Inevitable: NATO Center Report – Nextgov

USDA Launches New Features on Farmers.gov | Nextgov


The Agriculture Department unveiled new features on farmers.gov today that aim to help customers better manage their farm loans and more easily navigate the application process for H-2A visas, which enable employers to bring in foreign workers for seasonal and temporary labor.

“In my travels across the country, I have consistently heard people express a desire for greater use of technology in the way we deliver programs at USDA,” Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said in a statement. “As we adopt new technology, we are introducing simple yet innovative approaches to support our farmers, ranchers, producers, and foresters as they support the nation every day.”

The interactive one-stop site for America’s agriculture producers launched in February last year as one of the original public-facing products created by the government’s IT modernization Centers of Excellence program.

In June 2018, the Technology Modernization Fund Board awarded USDA $10 million to build a customer experience portal on the site.

Source: USDA Launches New Features on Farmers.gov – Nextgov