House focuses on cybersecurity R&D in energy spending bill | FCW


The House Appropriations Committee approved a series of cybersecurity-related research and development initiatives designed to tighten up protection to the electric grid and other energy systems as part of its annual spending bill for Energy and Water Development.

The bill, which passed committee on June 10, sets aside $150 million for Cybersecurity, Energy Security and Emergency response services, $30 million higher than 2019-levels of spending. The measure is being teed up as one of four appropriations to be voted on by the full House in the first “minibus” of fiscal year 2020 funding bills.

Source: House focuses on cybersecurity R&D in energy spending bill — FCW

Bringing Open Standards for Safety Critical to the Automotive Industry | Design News

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Enhanced safety features are seen by many as the next major differentiator for vehicle manufactures looking to grow market share. At the same time, artificial intelligence is increasingly seen as a means to enable these advanced features and capabilities that were not previously considered possible or viable.

Advancing safety features by using sensor fusion in a vehicle to make tactical driving decisions is only seen as viable if using artificial intelligence, for instance.

The next-generation of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) support in vehicles needs to compute vast amounts of data using sensor fusion applications with decision-making capabilities in order to make sense of the environment in which vehicles operate and make safe tactical maneuvers and decisions.

This presents a growing need for neural network processing and multi-layer data compute stacks to receive and consume vast amounts of data from things like sensors, cameras, GPS, LiDAR 3D point data, ultrasonics, and V2X or V2V communication.

Moreover, there is a need for the layers in these systems to not only be technically efficient, but also compatible with existing automotive safety standards.

Source: Bringing Open Standards for Safety Critical to the Automotive Industry | Design News

Hollywood: Don’t Let 5G Madness Screw Up TV | Light Reading

nullAmerica’s “race to 5G” is now running up against America’s love of television.

Specifically, some of the nation’s biggest content companies — including Disney, Discovery, CBS and Fox — are warning that the wireless industry’s latest 5G proposal could mess up video programming for up to 300 million people throughout the US.

“There ought to be at least as much time and thought devoted to protecting video downlinks [for TV] as there has been to the debate over private clearing vs. public auctions [for 5G spectrum],” wrote the content companies in a filing to the FCC.

Source: Hollywood: Don’t Let 5G Madness Screw Up TV | Light Reading

Eurobites: Chinese Ban Could Cost Europe euro 55B, Warns GSMA | Light Reading

A GSMA study estimates that a ban on the use of Chinese telecom equipment would add around €55 billion ($62 billion) to the cost of 5G network rollout in Europe, Reuters reports.

The higher bill would be the result of both “higher input costs” following a “significant loss of competition” and the need to replace existing infrastructure before carrying out 5G upgrades. (See Huawei 5G Ban May Cost UK £7B, Say Telcos in Panicky Report.)

Source: Eurobites: Chinese Ban Could Cost Europe euro 55B, Warns GSMA | Light Reading

IoT Security Gap Is Widening | EE Times

The problem is that it’s super easy to connect devices to your network, but not so easy to see and manage them. Visibility, or the lack thereof, is a gaping problem. If you don’t know what devices are sending and receiving communications over the internet, you can’t possibly ensure those communications are secure.

In our analysis, we saw a variety of consumer devices generating traffic, such as smart watches, home assistants, and even a few cars. Consumer-grade IoT devices are notorious for weak security, with default passwords that often go unchanged, making them susceptible to brute-force attacks. In fact, IoT malware that we recently analyzed contains lists of default passwords in their code, so such attacks are fairly trivial.

It’s mind-boggling that in 2019 companies continue to ship products with little to no security.

Source: IoT Security Gap Is Widening | EE Times

A New Industrial Base Is Taking Shape. Call It the Military-AI Complex. | Defense One


Today’s leading digital companies have disrupted every industry they have touched, from publishing to automotive.

Could Could Amazon and the rest of the “FAANG companies”—Facebook, Apple, Netflix, and Google—or one of a handful of pure-play artificial-intelligence companies, such as the authors’ SparkCognition, become fixtures of this new industrial base?

While that remains to be seen, the Pentagon supplier that can master robotics and AI will become the most essential of the firms that build America’s arsenal.

Moreover, the Defense Department’s practices will increasingly resemble those of this new wave of strategically important companies because that is what the current revolution in warfare requires.

The world is on the doorstep of an artificial intelligence- and robotics-driven revolution in conflict that, after decades of looming just over the horizon, now is a near-term certainty.

Source: A New Industrial Base Is Taking Shape. Call It the Military-AI Complex. – Defense One

Nuclear Energy Regulators Need to Bring on More Cyber Experts, Watchdog Says | Nextgov

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The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is facing a mass exodus of cybersecurity experts in the years ahead, which could limit its ability to ensure the nation’s nuclear power plants are safe from digital attacks, an internal watchdog found.

Nearly one-third of NRC’s cybersecurity inspectors will be eligible for retirement by the end of fiscal 2020, and agency officials worry they aren’t training enough people to take their place, according to the NRC Inspector General.

With nuclear power stations becoming increasingly popular targets for online adversaries, the shortage of cyber expertise could leave the agency struggling to do its job, auditors said.

“If staffing levels and skill sets do not align with cybersecurity inspection workload requirements, NRC’s ability to adapt to a dynamic threat environment and detect problems with [nuclear power plants’] cyber security programs could be compromised,” they wrote in a recent report.

Source: Nuclear Energy Regulators Need to Bring on More Cyber Experts, Watchdog Says – Nextgov

US-China Tech Cold War Puts Europe in the Middle | Defense One


A decade ago, a European scholar asked a Chinese scholar, “What does China-European strategic partnership look like?” The Chinese scholar responded: “We hope that when China goes to war with the United States, Europe will at least remain neutral.”

The looming “tech cold war” between the United States and China may now provide an initial test of that proposition. In May, Google became the first of many U.S. tech firms to announce its split from Chinese telecom giant Huawei in compliance with a new U.S. Commerce Department regulation.

If implemented stringently, the regulation—which prohibits U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei without a government license—would shake the tech and telecom industries worldwide, potentially delay Europe’s 5G rollout plans, and begin to decouple the U.S. and Chinese tech sectors in the name of national security.

Stuck in the middle will be Europe.

Source: US-China Tech Cold War Puts Europe in the Middle – Defense One

Sleep-Monitoring Apps and Beds Should Keep You Up At Night | Time


Sleep Number, one company that makes beds that can track heart rate, respiration and movement, says it collects more than 8 billion biometric data points every night, gathered each second and sent via an app through the internet to the company’s servers.’

.. consumer-privacy advocates are increasingly raising concerns about the fate of personal health information, which is potentially valuable to companies that collect and sell it, gathered through a growing number of internet-connected devices.

“We don’t know what happens to all that data,” says Burcu Kilic, director of the digital rights program at Public Citizen, an advocacy group in Washington, D.C.

Source: Sleep-Monitoring Apps and Beds Should Keep You Up At Night | Time

Huawei challenges legality of U.S. defense bill as sanctions fight ramps up | Reuters

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China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd has filed a legal motion seeking to declare a U.S. defense law unconstitutional, in the telecom equipment maker’s latest bid to fight sanctions from Washington that threaten to push it out of global markets.

The motion for summary judgment in its lawsuit against the U.S. government, filed late Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, asks to declare the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) unconstitutional the latest development in a lawsuit brought by Huawei in March.

Source: Huawei challenges legality of U.S. defense bill as sanctions fight ramps up – Reuters