Trump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rod Rosenstein as deputy attorney general


President Donald Trump on Tuesday nominated Jeffrey Rosen, a longtime litigator and deputy transportation secretary, to replace Rod Rosenstein as deputy attorney general.

In his current post, the 60-year-old Rosen serves as the Department of Transportation’s chief operating officer and is in charge of implementing the department’s safety and technological priorities. He rejoined DOT in 2017 after previously serving as general counsel from 2003 to 2006.

Source: Trump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rod Rosenstein as deputy attorney general

Amazon HQ2 cancellation: Long Island City didn’t need this | Vox


Amazon announced Thursday morning that, in the face of backlash from local elected officials to the intended tax subsidies associated with the plans to build “HQ2” in Long Island City, it is going to drop the project entirely.

That’s a good way for Amazon to send a message to other state and city governments around the country that may be considering tax incentives for Amazon facilities in the future: Jeff Bezos is not kidding around. But it’s also a win for the resurgent left in New York City, which rejected both the specifics of the plan and also more broadly the kind of coziness between elected officials and big business that the dealmaking represented.

While the question of local government subsidies to entice businesses remains an urgent one (see, for example, The Verge’s exposé of Scott Walker’s disastrous $4.1 billion Foxconn boondoggle), the HQ2 drama in many ways reveals an even bigger policy failure.

Source: Amazon HQ2 cancellation: Long Island City didn’t need this – Vox

Amazon’s Retreat and the New Politics of Tech


“While polls show that 70% of New Yorkers support our plans and investment,” Amazon sniffed, “a number of state and local politicians have made it clear that they oppose our presence and will not work with us to build the type of relationships that are required to go forward with the project we and many others envisioned in Long Island City.”

Critics such as state Senator Michael Gianaris blasted the statement. “Like a petulant child, Amazon insists on getting its way or takes its ball and leaves,” Gianaris told The New York Times.

“The only thing that happened here is that a community that was going to be profoundly affected by their presence started asking questions … Amazon admits they will grow their presence in New York without their promised subsidies. So what was all this really about?”

Source: Amazon’s Retreat and the New Politics of Tech

Secrets of a four-day week, from an owner who wants every company to try it


The head of a New Zealand company which trialed and then adopted a four-day week offered to all its staff—with no wage cuts or additional hours on work days—says he knows how to make it work for any company.

It needn’t lead to a drop in revenue, he says, and there’s no excuse not to try it.

Just one thing: Don’t talk about it in terms of employee wellbeing.

Source: Secrets of a four-day week, from an owner who wants every company to try it

Why Walmart farms out same-day grocery deliveries to low-cost freelance drivers | Reuters

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Leonard and his cohort of some 16.5 million American “gig” workers – people who currently work in contingent jobs or as on call workers – come at a lower cost for Walmart than full-time employees, according to interviews with drivers, delivery companies and Walmart documents reviewed by Reuters.

But they lack loyalty when there are better paying deliveries out there, adding risk to Walmart’s latest attempt to win more online grocery customers.

Source: Why Walmart farms out same-day grocery deliveries to low-cost freelance drivers | Reuters

The Brief – Germany: Europe’s Janus | EURACTIV.com


The day after the new leader of the Christian Democrats, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, distanced herself from Angela Merkel’s migration legacy, economists published a report showing that Germany needs at least 260,000 migrants a year by 2060 if the country is to meet its skilled labor needs.

To Ancient Romans, Janus was the god of the beginnings and the ends, presiding over every entrance and departure, and because every door and passageway looks in two directions, Janus was seen as two-faced or Janus bifrons — the god who looked both ways.

The very same can be applied to Germany when it comes to the highly sensitive issue of immigration, fueled, of course, by a number of upcoming elections …

Source: The Brief – Germany: Europe’s Janus – EURACTIV.com

Europe: An industrial society of the future | EURACTIV.com


.. Amid this context, the responsibility for pursuing long-term sustainable goals falls upon those in the wider community who can stake a claim in the climate debate. One such player is Europe’s tech industry, who made their intentions clear during last week’s Industry Days conference in Brussels.

“It is not what Europe can do for industry, but what industry can do for Europe,” Malte Lohan, director-general of Orgalim, a leading EU trade association, said on stage during the conference.

“The challenges are broad and far-ranging,” he said. “How do we address the issue of climate change in a resource-constrained world, how do we adapt to changing demographics – people living and working longer, how do we reinvigorate our citizens’ belief in the European project?”

Source: Europe: An industrial society of the future – EURACTIV.com

Entrepreneurial skills as a vital tool to empower young people in Europe | EURACTIV.com


Facing considerable demographic, social and economic challenges, the EU should pay particular attention to its most exceptional asset – the Europeans, starting with the youth. In my previous text published last year, I focused on the problematic lack of digital education.

I concluded that in a rapidly changing global world, it is mainly skills that will become the engine of our competitiveness. There is a change in the way we are working and education can no longer lag behind. This is equally valid even for entrepreneurial skills, which I will be focusing on today.

Source: Entrepreneurial skills as a vital tool to empower young people in Europe – EURACTIV.com

How robotics will shape Europe – and the policy that will support it | EURACTIV.com


The future landscape of work in Europe will undoubtedly include a significant increase in robotics technologies – and this could bring major benefits if the right policies are in place to ensure people have the best skills to thrive in Europe’s new world of work.

As the Chair of the European Parliament’s Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) I see every day how robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) can be implemented across sectors, from farming to space, and how they are transforming our daily lives, from the simple (such as turning on the lights in our houses) to the more complex (preventing diseases in the health sector and creating new materials for us to wear).

Source: How robotics will shape Europe – and the policy that will support it – EURACTIV.com

Finnish finance minister: ‘Case closed’ for universal basic income | EURACTIV.com


One of the main goals of the experiment was to see whether job-seekers felt more encouraged to look for a job with a universal basic income. The results did not prove this point. Checkmate then?

Firstly, I have to say that I have never been in favor of a universal basic income. But it was very important for our coalition partners in the government.

The first results showed that employment did not increase, but only improved the well-being of the participants. For me it was not surprising, because there was less bureaucracy to get your money every month [the basic income was €560].

Following the results, now all the main parties, the Social-democrats, the prime minister’s party and mine are all against a universal basic income.

We want conditionality for the social security systems. That is why I think the case is closed in Finland.

The Greens and Left-Wing party are still in favor.

Source: Finnish finance minister: ‘Case closed’ for universal basic income – EURACTIV.com