Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | US News


While DACA remains in legal limbo, the educational rights of children no matter their legal status were codified by the Supreme Court in 1982. In Plyler vs. Doe, the justices held that age-appropriate children are entitled to a K-12 public education regardless of their immigration status. Districts also can’t implement policies or practices that might have a chilling effect on immigrant student enrollment, such as requiring Social Security numbers on paperwork.

Plyler vs. Doe was back in the headlines in late April after Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told a congressional committee it was “a local community decision” whether students suspected of being in the country illegally would be reported to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. She walked back her remark in a subsequent hearing two weeks later.

Source: Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | The Report | US News

These are the conversations you need to have as a new manager


It happened: You’re a new manager now.

Perhaps it’s the first time you’re leading a team. Or you’re taking over a new team as a manager. Either way, that first meeting as a new manager is a daunting event. What should the agenda for that first meeting with the new team be? How should you set expectations as a new manager? Should you make prepare some sort of “new manager introduction speech”?

  • Build trust, don’t chart a vision (yet)
  • Get to know your team members–and take notes
  • Share who you are, more than surface-level stuff
  • Make it clear that you’re in “learning mode”
  • Ask 2 to 4 probing, thoughtful questions
  • Be proactive in your next steps
  • Be prepared for tough questions

Source: These are the conversations you need to have as a new manager

Leaders, Don’t Be the Cheese in the Panini | GovExec.com


When you’re in a designated leadership role, there are certain opportunities that accrue to you because you’re the incumbent in the role.

Examples of these things include goal setting, resource allocation, team selection and development, information flows and relational access.

Pretty much all of the things that give you leverage in your role are related to leadership activities. Your leverage will rarely if ever come from your subject matter expertise.

Focus on the things that only you can do as the designated leader.

Source: Leaders, Don’t Be the Cheese in the Panini – Executive Coach – Management – GovExec.com

Yes, Impostor Syndrome is Real: Here’s How to Deal With It | Time


Have you ever felt like you don’t belong? Like your friends or colleagues are going to discover you’re a fraud, and you don’t actually deserve your job and accomplishments?

If so, you’re in good company.

These feelings are known as impostor syndrome, or what psychologists often call impostor phenomenon.

Source: Yes, Impostor Syndrome is Real: Here’s How to Deal With It | Time

Unpacking the Stereotype of the Unsmiling Russian


After we get our coffees and find seats, she tells me that she finds Americans’ unfailing cheer—the smiles and “how are yous” of neighbors, servers, cashiers, and journalists—tiring.

Russian culture, she says, has a different set of standards for polite behavior.

Even dealing with a simple “How are you?” felt complicated. People in Russia didn’t engage in this kind of social script, and to her it seemed unnecessary. Did they really want to know how she was? No.

Anybody who asked only did so in anticipation of a “fine!” or “great!” that would ease them into the next part of the conversation.

If she answered honestly (“I’m tired”), which is what felt most natural, she worried she’d come off as rude.

And when she preempted the awkwardness by asking “How are you?” first, she felt disingenuous.

Source: Unpacking the Stereotype of the Unsmiling Russian

Trump’s catch-and-detain policy snares many who call the U.S. home


Recent media attention has focused on the Trump administration’s policy of removing children from parents caught crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally. The Reuters findings show that denial of bond is also separating families that have been in the country for years and include children who are U.S. citizens.

“It’s not like criminal proceedings where in 48 hours somebody is deciding whether or not you need to be in jail,” said Katherine Evans, who directs the immigration clinic at the University of Idaho College of Law.

“This is four to six weeks later. … You’ve already lost your job, you have no income, all of the consequences of being in jail are imposed before you can get any review of whether or not you need to be in jail.”

“It’s an absurd, let alone inhumane, expenditure of resources,” said Elizabeth Matherne, Vasquez’s lawyer. “You are putting people in cages that are not harmful to society.”

Source: Trump’s catch-and-detain policy snares many who call the U.S. home

Why News-Style Inverted Pyramids Enhance Executive Communication


Maximize executives’ leverage with three communication steps:

1) Prepare yourself and the executives in advance,

2) deliver in a news-style inverted pyramid,

3) follow through.

Start by anticipating their perspective, situation, understanding, assumptions, objectives, priorities, concerns, and preferences for how they receive information.

Sometimes you already know these. Sometimes the executives will tell you. Sometimes you need scouts and spies: scouts who have been through the drill, spies like executive assistants who see everything and are happy to share if you ask for their help in giving their bosses more leverage.

Source: Why News-Style Inverted Pyramids Enhance Executive Communication

IBM-led coalition pushes senators for action on better tech skills training | TheHill


As competition for high-skilled labor increases and as the U.S. economy reaches full employment, every effort must be made to close the skills gaps that many industries across all sectors face,” IBM and company wrote in its letter to the senators.

Source: IBM-led coalition pushes senators for action on better tech skills training | TheHill

Disadvantaged schools don’t need smaller classes—they need better teachers | Quartz


Great teachers have a huge impact on kids. Research has shown that students with highly effective teachers (those in the 90th percentile) learn 1.5 years’ worth of material in a year, while students with teachers in the 10th percentile learn just half a years’ worth of material in the same period.

“No other attribute of schools comes close to having this much influence on student achievement,” Eric Hanushek, an economist at Stanford University, told the Economist.

Source: Disadvantaged schools don’t need smaller classes—they need better teachers — Quartz

Analysts: Medicare Insolvency Looms, But Social Security Poses Bigger Threat | US News


“By the time that date rolls around, the system is so far gone that you cannot, with any plausibility, restore it to solvency within the confines of its historical financing structure,” he tells U.S. News.

Both the Social Security trust fund and Medicare’s hospital trust fund are financed primarily through payroll taxes, but because of a variety of structural factors – the age of the funds, the differing sizes of the annual revenue and benefit payouts – Social Security has a much larger build-up of money in its trust fund than Medicare does, which only has about the value of eight months of payments in reserve.

But Medicare’s shortfall is also relatively small compared to what Social Security’s would be if no action is taken.

Source: Analysts: Medicare Insolvency Looms, But Social Security Poses Bigger Threat | Health Care News | US News