What GM’s layoffs reveal about the digitalization of the auto industry


While all of those perspectives are relevant, the most revealing aspect of GM’s announcement may well be what the layoffs say about broader technology trends. GM’s layoffs are not just incremental but existential, in that sense:

They are about accelerating the staffing changes mandated by the company’s aggressive transition from analog to digital products and from gasoline to electric power.

As such, the new layoffs (and associated future hirings) are likely an augury of much more disruption coming — in the auto sector, for sure, but also in firms all across the economy.

Central to GM’s announcement is, in our view, what we call the “digitalization of everything.”

By that, we mean that GM’s layoffs significantly reflect the talent and workforce strains associated with the diffusion of digital and electronic technologies into nearly every industry, business, and workplace in America.

Source: What GM’s layoffs reveal about the digitalization of the auto industry

CrossFit’s founder Greg Glassman is amassing a doctor army to disrupt health care | Vox


Patient after patient would stream into her clinic with diabetes, weight problems, and heart disease. Ronda Rockett followed the medical guidelines, recommending healthier diets and more exercise. But despite her best efforts — even texting and emailing motivational follow-ups — many failed to change at all, either because they didn’t want to or didn’t have the means.

In 2013, eager to try something new, Rockett decided to quit medicine and close up her practice. What she did next, she says, is the most meaningful contribution to health care she’s made to date. She opened a CrossFit gym.

CrossFit is a high-intensity interval training and resistance exercise routine known for instilling a cult-like devotion among followers and promoting the low-carb diet.

Source: CrossFit’s founder Greg Glassman is amassing a doctor army to disrupt health care – Vox

Why The Agile Workplace Must Include AI And Humans


What should the workforce of the future look like?

Unlike today’s model, it will be made up of three distinct types of “workers”: traditional (full- and part-time), agile (gig, contract, project-based) and artificial intelligence (automation technology).

I believe, within the next few years, about 40% of a business’s workforce should consist of a mix of agile and AI workers.

Source: Why The Agile Workplace Must Include AI And Humans

Revealed: Google’s ‘two-tier’ workforce training document | The Guardian


The guide instructs Google employees on the ins and outs of interacting with its tens of thousands of temps, vendors and contractors – a class of worker known at Google as TVCs.

“Working with TVCs and Googlers is different,” the training documentation, titled the The ABCs of TVCs, explains. “Our policies exist because TVC working arrangements can carry significant risks.”

The risks Google appears to be most concerned about include standard insider threats, like leaks of proprietary information, but also – and especially – the risk of being found to be a joint employer, a legal designation which could be exceedingly costly for Google in terms of benefits.

Source: Revealed: Google’s ‘two-tier’ workforce training document | Technology | The Guardian

Enforcing — The Second Of The Only Four Ways To Succeed As A CEO


The overall thesis of this series of four articles is that the only four ways to succeed as a CEO are to act as chief enabler, enforcer, enroller or customer experience officer. This is the final choice flowing from your overall strategic choice, which dictates your choice of culture, organization, how to operate, and the CEO’s role.

This current article will dig into what it means to be the chief enforcer.

Source: Enforcing — The Second Of The Only Four Ways To Succeed As A CEO

NASA Continues Its Reign Atop Best Places to Work in Government | GovExec.com


Among large agencies, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration led the pack for the seventh straight year, increasing 0.3 points from 80.9 last year to 81.2 in 2018.

The Health and  Human Services Department came in second, improving 0.5 points to 70.9 this year. And the Commerce Department saw a 1.1 point increase, from 69.2 in 2017 to 70.3 this year.

But the Agriculture Department saw a 6.9 point decrease in engagement, according to the Partnership’s rankings, falling to 59 this year, ahead of only the Homeland Security Department among large agencies in overall score.

Source: NASA Continues Its Reign Atop Best Places to Work in Government – Management – GovExec.com

Trust Has No Substitute | EE Times


One of my toughest judgments when I was CEO was to figure out which suppliers, distributors, managers, and a host of other categories were best for my company. There is no rulebook.

What I had to rely on was my own capability to judge who was best. You, must, of course, meet with the people involved, ask a lot of questions, check out all that’s pertinent, review what data you have, and get recommendations.

In the end it is my decision. More than anything, it is a matter of trust with the other person.

Source: Trust Has No Substitute | EE Times

Digital Advances Continue to Transform Design and Manufacturing | Design News


For years, advanced design and manufacturing technology was mostly in the hands of the very largest companies—from GM and GE to Boeing and PG. That’s changed remarkably over the last five years. We’re continued advances in industrial technology but, more to the point, we’re seeing the democratization of that technology.

The proliferation of design and manufacturing technology is beginning to change the nature of what it means to be a design engineer. “The future we’re making is affected by all of the trends that are happening.

In past years, design engineers were constrained by the manufacturing process,” Stephen Hooper, VP and general manager for Fusion 360 at Autodesk, said at the Autodesk Accelerate conference.

Source: Digital Advances Continue to Transform Design and Manufacturing | Design News

A Cautionary Tale To Be Had From Swedish School Reforms | Social Europe

Most of the media coverage has focused on Sweden’s declining test results and growing educational inequality. However, a less well-known but equally alarming phenomenon has received almost no attention abroad: school segregation.

Segregation is one of the most serious social problems facing Sweden and many other wealthy nations.

A society that is increasingly divided into social and ethnic enclaves faces the risk of increasing tensions and polarization.

In Sweden we have seen this on a weekly basis in recent years, with an alarming level of violence in suburbs that has received widespread attention.

Source: A Cautionary Tale To Be Had From Swedish School Reforms • Social Europe

How the Great Recession hurt the middle class—twice


While wages are up for everyone, the gains have been far from equal.

It is not too surprising that wage growth was highest in the top quintile—this element of economic polarization is now well known. Wage growth was also reasonably robust at the bottom, above 6 percent, as several minimum wage increases at the national and state levels took effect.

However, wage growth in the middle quintiles, especially the second and third, was much weaker. The result is that wages at the bottom and middle have been pushed closer together, while wages at the top have pulled away from everyone else.

Source: How the Great Recession hurt the middle class—twice