Down in a hole: Bosnia miners fear green revolution | EURACTIV.com


For years, life in Bosnia’s Breza revolved around its coal mine, but the global shift from fossil fuels to renewables threatens the industry that was once the pride of communist Yugoslavia.

Armel Jekalovic and other miners, once hailed as local heroes who brought home steady incomes, now fear theirs could be the last generation to earn a living from Bosnia’s coalfields.

“This situation around the energy transition worries us,” says Jekalovic, 36, who oversees the operations at the mine northwest of Sarajevo.

“Production is constantly decreasing, as are the number of employees. People don’t feel safe and are looking for an alternative.”

Source: Down in a hole: Bosnia miners fear green revolution – EURACTIV.com

Globalisation, telemigrants and working conditions | Philippe Pochet


The potential risk of service-sector offshoring, against a backdrop of economic globalization, is nothing new. As early as 2007, the American economist Alan Blinder highlighted the risks offshoring posed to 46 occupations in the United States.

More recently, but before the pandemic, Richard Baldwin argued that ‘teleworking’, along with the emergence of artificial intelligence, would bring a major realignment with significant implications—a new wave of globalization, this time of the service sector. Baldwin used the term ‘telemigration’ to refer to individuals who would, as a result, be living in one country while working for a company based in another.

On the whole, though, these feared changes have yet to materialise—at least to the extent predicted.

Source: Globalisation, telemigrants and working conditions – Philippe Pochet

Capitol Hill staffers aren’t holding their breath waiting for a bump in pay


For a while it seemed as if this would be the year that Congress tackled its long-standing staffer retention issues, but aides say that hope is fizzling, replaced by the usual holiday slog.

The prospect of higher pay soared this summer after House leadership decoupled member and staffer salary caps, and as appropriators proposed a 20 percent increase in the money members can spend on their offices and payroll. But as fall turns to winter, the two parties remain far apart on how to fund the government for fiscal 2022 beyond a series of stopgaps.

Source: Capitol Hill staffers aren’t holding their breath waiting for a bump in pay

If young people ‘are the future’, that needs to start now | Kristof Becker, Tea Jarc and Joscha Wagner


Next year has been designated ‘European Year of Youth’. The Conference on the Future of Europe must hold out a real prospect for young people.

Young people have suffered most in social and economic terms from the Covid-19 crisis, as the European Commission recognizes. Closed schools and training centres, unemployment and social restrictions, lack of material support and exclusion from social-security systems—all this has worsened, directly and drastically, the living situation of many young Europeans.

Yet youth opportunities were already limited in many European countries even before the pandemic. The consequences of the 2008 financial crash still affect the lives of many, especially via persistent youth unemployment.

Source: If young people ‘are the future’, that needs to start now – Kristof Becker, Tea Jarc and Joscha Wagner

How Social Class Affects the Career Ladder | Knowledge@Wharton


Martin, who is the Don and Lauren Morel Associate Professor at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, has spent years studying the effects of social class in the workplace, a topic that touches on his personal trajectory from a typical lower-middle-class kid in public school to an academic who earned his doctorate at Cornell University, an Ivy League institution.

“I found myself in a lot of situations on an upward path where I didn’t know how to behave,” he recalled. “I’d find myself at a fine dining institution or attending an educational information session for a prestigious university and realizing that I was very clearly the odd man out. I didn’t have the cultural knowledge of what to do and what to be. But I learned it.”

Source: How Social Class Affects the Career Ladder – Knowledge@Wharton

Lockheed Martin CTO Steven Walker focuses company efforts on hypersonics, 5G, and artificial intelligence | Military Aerospace


The IEEE senior member worked for more than 30 years in the U.S. civil service, first for the Air Force Research Laboratory, and then for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the U.S. Department of Defense’s research arm. Last year Walker joined the private sector as vice president and chief technology officer at defense contractor Lockheed Martin.

Although Walker is not fighting on the front lines, for nearly three decades he has been working behind the scenes to fund a variety of important projects for the military and civilians. The projects have developed fast bombers and fighter jets, inexpensive launch vehicles for satellites, and the mRNA technology used in coronavirus vaccines. He is continuing his focus on military technologies at Lockheed Martin. At DARPA he focused on hypersonics and related technologies.

Source: Lockheed Martin CTO Steven Walker focuses company efforts on hypersonics, 5G, and artificial intelligence | Military Aerospace

Is remote work an ecological alternative? | Selen Uncular


The pandemic required many people around the world—except essential workers, such as in health, transport, care and nutrition—to work remotely and maintain social distance to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. As an atypical form of employment differing from the standard model based on the workplace, remote work existed before Covid-19. Yet it has been effected more than ever during the lockdowns and beyond, despite being associated with serious violations of rights.

The International Labour Organization defines the phenomenon as work performed fully or partly at a location apart from the default workplace, including one’s own residence, co-working spaces or other sites and houses. As an umbrella concept, it embraces telework, where workers use information and communications technology (ICT) to carry out work remotely. Telework and work at home constitute subcategories of remote work which can be designed, and combined, in several ways.

Source: Is remote work an ecological alternative? – Selen Uncular

Why social mobility is key to explaining attitudes toward multiculturalism | Lisa-Marie Kraus and Stijn Daenekindt


People without a migration background have become a numerical minority in numerous western European cities, such as LondonAmsterdam, Rotterdam and Vienna. Looking at the generation of children aged 15 and younger, these numbers are increasing, indicating that this is a lasting phenomenon.

These evolutions generate various challenges. One important aspect is how people without a migration background experience their changing status and, more generally, how this influences their attitudes towards multiculturalism.

Source: Why social mobility is key to explaining attitudes toward multiculturalism – Lisa-Marie Kraus and Stijn Daenekindt

Is the Great Resignation Giving Rise to the Entrepreneur? | Knowledge@Wharton


Wharton management professor Jacqueline “Jax” Kirtley isn’t making any predictions about when or how the Great Resignation will end.

Nearly 4.3 million Americans quit their jobs in August, the highest number on record since the government began collecting data 20 years ago. The quit rate coincides with a dramatic surge in applications for new businesses since the COVID-19 pandemic began, mostly for sole-proprietor ventures.

Source: Is the Great Resignation Giving Rise to the Entrepreneur? – Knowledge@Wharton

Here’s Why Workers Are Quitting Their Jobs in Record Numbers | Time


If April 2020 was the month of pink slips—as the rapid spread of COVID-19 resulted in the loss of 20.5 million jobs—then Fall 2021 is the dawn of their revenge.

A record-breaking 4.3 million Americans quit their jobs in August across an array of industries, according to a report released Tuesday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). That’s the highest level since the agency started tracking such data in 2000, and the sixth consecutive month of sky-high quitting rates. Meanwhile, the 7.7 million people who remain unemployed aren’t, for the most part, jumping at the roughly 10.4 million job openings—leaving business after business with ‘Help Wanted’ placards in their windows.

Source: Here’s Why Workers Are Quitting Their Jobs in Record Numbers | Time