Redaction | Quartz

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Special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report on Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election was released today—at least most of it.

The public version has been heavily redacted to conceal information related to confidential grand jury proceedings, classified intelligence material, ongoing investigations, and a few other categories. (A “limited number” of Congress members will be allowed to view a less-redacted version).

The final tally: 953 redacted sections in 448 pages.

Source: Redaction — Quartz Obsession — Quartz

Mueller’s Damning Portrait of Trump | Defense One


The president lies wantonly and profligately—to the press, to his aides, and above all to the public. He tries to interfere in investigations. He acts as if he has something to hide. He reacts petulantly to being told no, and repeatedly pressures staffers even after being rejected.

Those words are not taken from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, but they might as well be.

Source: Mueller’s Damning Portrait of Trump – Defense One

In divided America, Mueller report hardens the most strident | Reuters


The release of the long-anticipated report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller on his inquiry into Russia’s role in the 2016 election landed in a stridently divided America: one side convinced Trump acted improperly, the other adamant that the investigation was a politically driven farce.

Mueller built an extensive case that Trump committed obstruction of justice but stopped short of concluding he had committed a crime, though he did not exonerate the president.

Source: In divided America, Mueller report hardens the most strident – Reuters

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Mueller explains why his family left Trump’s golf club | CNNPolitics


Special counsel Robert Mueller explained for the first time why he and his family left President Donald Trump’s Virginia golf club in the redacted version of his report released on Thursday.

The footnote on pages 80 and 81 of the redacted report released by the Justice Department on Thursday was one of the only times Mueller defended himself against criticism from the President.

Trump had previously used the fact that Mueller and his family left the club to claim he had a conflict of interest.

Source: Mueller explains why his family left Trump’s golf club – CNNPolitics

Five takeaways from Mueller’s report | TheHill

Mueller ultimately did not establish that Trump or members of his campaign coordinated or conspired with Moscow to affect the 2016 presidential election, but he and his team declined to reach a conclusion on whether the president obstructed justice.

That issue is likely to be at the center of the political debate moving forward.

Here are five takeaways from Thursday.

Source: Five takeaways from Mueller’s report | TheHill

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House subpoena for Mueller report escalates investigation


The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee issued a subpoena Friday for special counsel’s Robert Mueller’s report as Congress escalates its investigation of President Donald Trump.

“It now falls to Congress to determine the full scope of that alleged misconduct and to decide what steps we must take going forward,” said Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y. He expects the Justice Department to comply by May 1.

While Mueller declined to prosecute Trump on obstruction of justice, he did not exonerate the president, all but leaving the question to Congress.

Source: House subpoena for Mueller report escalates investigation

Brexit Has Damaged U.K.’s Global Image, Experts Say | US News

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When it comes to Brexit, the United Kingdom‘s now delayed divorce from the European Union, the British public is still deeply divided on whether it’s a good idea.

But there’s one thing that a sizable majority of voters agree on: the Conservative government of Prime Minister Theresa May bungled the negotiations with the EU.

A mere 7 percent of Britons say the talks have gone well, according to recently published data from the National Centre for Social Research. Meanwhile, 80 percent of Leave voters and 85 percent of Remainers say it’s been a mess.

Source: Brexit Has Damaged U.K.’s Global Image, Experts Say | Best Countries | US News

The Mueller Report’s Release Doesn’t Mean Mueller Is Going Away | US News


The release of the Mueller report had all the makings of a seminal Washington event, with its breathless nonstop coverage, melodramatic conclusions and predictable doses of partisan outrage and gloating.

But if you assumed the publication of the nearly two-year, 400-page investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election would resolve the issue of whether justice was properly served, you probably lack a Twitter account or a cable news subscription.

For both incensed Democrats and a triumphant President Donald Trump, this isn’t the end of Mueller or his findings. It’s just the beginning of another foray.

Source: The Mueller Report’s Release Doesn’t Mean Mueller Is Going Away | Politics | US News

Mueller Report Sets Up Another Test of the Balance of Powers | US News

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It’s a phrase that’s been thrown around a lot on cable TV and in the halls of Congress since America sent to the Oval Office a flamboyant businessman who has been both reviled and revered for his iconoclastic view of Washington norms and institutions.

But the release of a redacted report by special counsel Robert Mueller has brought the concern to a new level, setting the country up for what legal scholars say is an unprecedented test of the separation of powers central to the nation’s very democracy.

“We do, certainly, have a great potential for a constitutional clash here, with the executive branch asserting the authority to be free of oversight, in complete contravention to the understood role of Congress in ensuring adherence to the rule of law by the administration,” says Caroline Fredrickson, president of the American Constitution Society.

Source: Mueller Report Sets Up Another Test of the Balance of Powers | The Civic Report | US News

What the Mueller report tells us about Russian influence operations


The report describes in stunning detail the inner workings of the full Russian operation. To date, the report is the most comprehensive account (in addition to the previously released indictment of IRA and GRU operatives) of how the Russian operation evolved over time, how successful it was in targeting and duping Americans, and the Kremlin’s motivation.

This post focuses specifically on what the Mueller report tells us about the information operations. A second post will focus on what we have learned about Russian cyber operations and capabilities.

Source: What the Mueller report tells us about Russian influence operations