Huawei arrest stokes fears of China reprisals among America Inc executives | Reuters


Officials from major U.S. companies who attended the event, a scheduled meeting of the local chapter of the U.S. Department of State’s Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC), voiced concerns about retaliation against American firms and their executives, two people with knowledge of the meeting said.

A number of attendees said their companies were considering restricting non-essential China travel and looking to move meetings outside the country, one of the people added.

Source: Huawei arrest stokes fears of China reprisals among America Inc executives | Reuters

Licking their wounds, fund managers prep for rally in ’19 | Reuters


Part of the yield curve inverted this week when yields on 5- year Treasuries dropped below those on both the 2- and 3-year securities, a signal that has preceded every U.S. recession in recent memory by between 15 months and 2 years.

Yet the long delay between a yield curve inversion and a full recession can still be a profitable time to invest, said Charles Lemonides, founder of New York-based hedge fund ValueWorks.

Source: Licking their wounds, fund managers prep for rally in ’19 | Reuters

Can Macron survive France’s ‘yellow vest’ revolution? | Reuters


It’s not hard to find reasons for this sudden unraveling of the grand ambitions of the youngest French leader since Napoleon.

Macron’s visions for this future appear increasingly disconnected from anything France, even Europe, has known or at least for the moment even wants.

“We must do away with this little political world which functions only for itself,” Laurent Tinois told the French daily Le Monde.

Source: Commentary: Can Macron survive France’s ‘yellow vest’ revolution? | Reuters

Factbox: Germany’s CDU elects new leader to succeed Merkel | Reuters


Merkel, 64, is not seeking re-election to the post but wants to stay on as chancellor for the remainder of the parliamentary term. The next federal election is due by October 2021.

Here are key facts on the candidates seeking to succeed Merkel as leader of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and details of the party’s voting process.

Source: Factbox: Germany’s CDU elects new leader to succeed Merkel | Reuters

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As Brexit crunch nears, campaign for new referendum gathers pace | Reuters


The idea of a second referendum has been gathering support from some senior British politicians and seems to have traction with sections of public opinion, but the political situation is so uncertain that it is hard to say whether this will actually translate into another vote, and when or how that might done, or what question might be put.

“We have gone from being seen as a fringe view, dismissed and laughed at, to now being at the centre of the Brexit debate,” McGrory, the 36-year-old campaign director of the People’s Vote campaign, said in an interview.

Source: As Brexit crunch nears, campaign for new referendum gathers pace | Reuters

The armed forces arithmetic isn’t adding up | TheHill

Politicians and generals frequently tell Americans that our military is “the finest fighting force the world has ever known.”

The Romans and Mongols might have taken issue with that, but we do have an unparalleled ability to project power around the globe and win tactical engagements, regardless of the troubling results of our post-9/11 wars.

Our military, however, has an enormous Achilles’ heel: its all-volunteer manpower system.

Source: The armed forces arithmetic isn’t adding up | TheHill

Germany Sticks To Its Mercantilist Model | Social Europe

As Donato Di Carlo rightly points out, the scale of the imbalances within the eurozone has been at the core of the academic and political debate. The most common criticism of Germany’s excessive surpluses usually refers to the wage restraint policies that the government implemented from the onset of EMU in the late 1990s.

With unit labor costs undercutting the inflation target set by the European Central Bank (ECB), Germany has amassed substantial gains in its price competitiveness through an effective depreciation of its real exchange rate.

This, in turn, enabled an accumulation of surpluses, which would have been impossible under a fluctuating exchange rate regime and an appreciating currency.

The problematic implications of the competitive divergences across the eurozone are generally well understood.

Now, the question about its viability hinges upon the rectification of the accumulated imbalances.

Source: Germany Sticks To Its Mercantilist Model • Social Europe

A Cautionary Tale To Be Had From Swedish School Reforms | Social Europe

Most of the media coverage has focused on Sweden’s declining test results and growing educational inequality. However, a less well-known but equally alarming phenomenon has received almost no attention abroad: school segregation.

Segregation is one of the most serious social problems facing Sweden and many other wealthy nations.

A society that is increasingly divided into social and ethnic enclaves faces the risk of increasing tensions and polarization.

In Sweden we have seen this on a weekly basis in recent years, with an alarming level of violence in suburbs that has received widespread attention.

Source: A Cautionary Tale To Be Had From Swedish School Reforms • Social Europe

The “Klimakanzlerin” Takes A Bow And Leaves A Vacuum | Social Europe

Merkel is no climate saint despite being nicknamed ‘climate chancellor.’ As a matter of fact, there is no political leader on whom such status can be bestowed. And sadly, none has done sufficiently enough to address climate change.

But compared to many in developed countries, Merkel, a former environment minister in Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s government before becoming chancellor in 2005, provides sound leadership on international climate talks.

Unfortunately, Germany continues to burn coal with Merkel as chancellor. 20.68 Gigawatt (GW) of brown coal and 27.64 GW of hard coal were being burnt when she took office.

Today, 21.20 GW and 25.05 GW respectively are still being burnt.

Source: The “Klimakanzlerin” Takes A Bow And Leaves A Vacuum • Social Europe

The Liberal Delusion | Social Europe

For as long as it is part of cultural class warfare, the fight against the far right will never be won. The frontline runs between middle-class groupings, which is why – even in these times of extreme inequality – the debate focusses on questions of morals and identity, not wealth distribution.

For much of recorded human history, questions about who we are and where we are going have been the domain of priests and philosophers.

Today, however, it is academics and creatives who are providing answers.

Source: The Liberal Delusion • Social Europe