The 5G Opportunity for Broadcasters Remains Tenuous | EE Times


When the mobile communications industry started its long evolution to the 5th generation (5G), one of the early significant applications identified was broadcasting. 5G was seen as equally applicable for both delivery of content and its production, notably for outside broadcast but also in a studio. However, this low hanging fruit has yet to start ripening in any serious way.

“There are some deployments we can point to, but on the whole what we are seeing are complementary applications rather than 5G being ready for any meaningful distribution of media content,” Peter MacAvock, Head of Delivery, Platforms and Services at the European  Broadcasting Union’s Technology and Innovation Division told EE Times.

Source: The 5G Opportunity for Broadcasters Remains Tenuous | EE Times

FCC formally designates Huawei and ZTE as national security threats | TheHill


The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Tuesday formally designated Chinese telecommunications groups Huawei and ZTE as national security threats, blocking them from accessing FCC funds.

The move was the formalization of a unanimous decision by the FCC in November to ban U.S. telecom groups from using the FCC’s $8.3 billion Universal Service Fund to purchase equipment from companies deemed threats.

Source: FCC formally designates Huawei and ZTE as national security threats | TheHill

Australia’s cyber security measures significantly increased with $1.3b injection for cyber spies


Australia will recruit 500 cyber spies and build on its offensive capabilities to take the online fight overseas in a $1.3 billion funding boost, amid rising tensions with China and a growing wave of attacks against the nation’s critical infrastructure.

Australian security agencies believe China is behind the cyber raids on all levels of government, although the Morrison government has chosen not to name the country involved.

Source: Australia’s cyber security measures significantly increased with $1.3b injection for cyber spies

NASA Watchdog Reports on Why the Agency Still Struggles with Cybersecurity | Nextgov


The inspector general for NASA notes resource constraints and a lack of awareness about information security policies and procedures by personnel are among the reasons behind continued ineffectiveness of the agency’s information security program.

The IG’s office has identified IT security and governance as a top management and performance challenge for the agency in annual reports going back to 2011.

“NASA has not implemented an effective Agency-wide information security program,” the IG wrote in the most recent review of NASA’s practices under the Federal Information Security Modernization Act.

For example, in reviewing the Agency Common Control (ACC) system, “which aggregates and manages common controls across all Agency information systems,” the IG found 94 of 203 common controls—46%—that NASA had assessed as “other than satisfied,” or deficient.

Among those were mechanisms to protect the agency’s systems from malicious code with automatic updates.

Source: NASA Watchdog Reports on Why the Agency Still Struggles with Cybersecurity – Nextgov

The labors of Lundmark: Herculean turnaround faces new Nokia boss | Light Reading


Twenty years later, after top jobs in everything from homeware to power plants, Lundmark will return to the Finnish equipment vendor at which he spent the whole of the 1990s. When he quit the firm, he was senior vice president of marketing on the Internet side. He re-joins in August, a month sooner than originally planned, as CEO.

His start date was officially brought forward today after Fortum, the energy company Lundmark is leaving behind, found a replacement who could start on July 1. Lundmark will have to quickly clear his mind of electric vehicle charging, soil remediation and hydroelectric power. A crash course in 5G, optical networks and cloud-native software will be his first priority.

Source: The labors of Lundmark: Herculean turnaround faces new Nokia boss | Light Reading

What went wrong at Edge Gravity? | Light Reading

Ericsson confirmed that it is shutting down Edge Gravity, an internal “accelerator unit” focused on building and launching a global edge cloud network in partnership with a bevy of telcos, cable operators, content delivery networks and data center operators.

Ericsson started to spread the word to partners, customers and employees that Edge Gravity, an underperforming piece of its Business Area Technologies and New Businesses (BTEB) group, “will close its operation over time,” TelecomTV reported earlier this month, noting that some executives tied to Edge Gravity have already reached out to other edge companies or have already left Ericsson.

The process of scrubbing Edge Gravity out of existence is already underway, as its individual website presence and its Twitter and LinkedIn accounts all appear to be gone.

Source: What went wrong at Edge Gravity? | Light Reading

New UK Huawei £1 billion Optoelectronics R&D HQ Approved | EE Times Europe


Speaking to the local government council planning meeting, Henk Koopmans, the CEO of Huawei Technologies Research & Development (UK), said, “We want this to be a key facility for Cambridge and the UK”. He said this would be a completely new facility and separate from the existing center it already has in Cambridge, indicating that it would involve moving many of its 200 people currently at its Adastral Park site near Ipswich.

Huawei said it will invest £1 billion in the first phase of the project, which includes construction of 50,000 square meters of facilities across nine acres of land and will directly create around 400 local jobs.

Once fully operational, it will become the international headquarters of Huawei’s optoelectronics business.

Source: New UK Huawei £1 billion Optoelectronics R&D HQ Approved – EE Times Europe

June 2020 – Bandwidth Pricing: How Low Can it Go? | Via Satellite


Prices have fallen for video, like broadband applications. But also evident is growing divergence between pricing levels for each application, explains Brent Prokosh, senior affiliate consultant at Euroconsult.

“The drop has been significantly more pronounced for broadband-oriented applications, including consumer connectivity, mobile backhaul, trunking, IFC, and maritime connectivity. Operators have been able to somewhat defend against pricing erosion for video distribution, due, in part, to a relative scarcity of high-quality Ku-band capacity at key orbital hotspots, and the ‘lock-in’ effects or costs associated with having to re-point thousands to millions of antennas, when switching satellites to pursue lower pricing,” says Prokosh.

Source: June 2020 – Bandwidth Pricing: How Low Can it Go? | Via Satellite

L3Harris KEO to build electro-optical photonics masts to aid stealth of Virginia-class attack submarines | Military & Aerospace Electronics


U.S. Navy undersea warfare experts are enhancing the stealthiness and survivability of the nation’s premiere fast-attack submarine fleet by equipping additional vessels with improved electro-optical sensor photonics masts.

The LPPM aboard Navy Virginia-class attack submarines operates in place of the traditional submarine periscope. The photonics mast uses a variety of electro-optical sensors, and does not penetrate the submarine hull like a traditional periscope. Instead, photonics mast sensors connect to the submarine by optical fiber.

Source: electro-optical submarines stealth | Military & Aerospace Electronics

Raytheon to provide artillery command and control battlefield network to Jordan to coordinate fire support | Military & Aerospace Electronics


Artillery fire-control experts at Raytheon Technologies Corp. will provide a battlefield network for automated planning, coordinating, controlling and executing artillery fire and effects to the Jordanian military under terms of a $29.3 million contract announced last week.

AFATDS, developed originally in the 1980s, is the fire support command and control (C2) system employed by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps to provide automated support for planning, coordinating, controlling and executing fires and effects.

Source: command and control fire support battlefield network | Military & Aerospace Electronics