Lockheed Martin sensor fusion testbed to boost situational awareness, enhance helicopter survivability | Intelligent Aerospace


Under the Army’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), Lockheed Martin is developing sensor fusion and integration technologies that enhance rotary-wing aircraft survivability and enable pilots to navigate safely in all environments, including when GPS is unavailable.

The MMSF algorithms blend data from multiple sensor types to restore a pilot’s situational awareness in degraded visual environments.

Source: Lockheed Martin sensor fusion testbed to boost situational awareness, enhance helicopter survivability – Intelligent Aerospace

Raytheon, MetTel Establish Alliance to Secure Government, Industry Communications Networks | Light Reading

This alliance is well-positioned to support the Administration’s IT modernization and cybersecurity priorities, including the emerging security challenges posed by internet-connected devices, including computers, routers and security cameras.

“Security is foremost on everyone’s mind today, especially with the constant emergence of new threat forms compounded by the exploding array of devices and network access points,” said Ed Fox, vice president of Network Services for MetTel. “The world needs a network that meets the highest government security standards and together, MetTel and Raytheon are committed to delivering that network.”

Source: Raytheon, MetTel Establish Alliance to Secure Government, Industry Communications Networks | Light Reading

NIST computer scientist stresses importance of safety, security in software programming | Intelligent Aerospace

We can create software with 100 times fewer vulnerabilities than we do today,

say NIST computer scientists, who recommend coders adopt the approaches they have compiled in the 60-page NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 8151: Dramatically Reducing Software Vulnerabilities.

The report is a collection of strategies gathered from across industry and other sources for reducing bugs in software. While the report is officially a response to a request for methods from the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Computer Scientist and co-author of the report Paul E. Black says its contents will help any organization that seeks to author high-quality, low-defect computer code.

Black and his NIST colleagues compiled these ideas while working with software assurance experts from many private companies in the computer industry as well as several government agencies that generate a good deal of code, including the Department of Defense and NASA.

Source: NIST computer scientist stresses importance of safety, security in software programming – Intelligent Aerospace

Comcast, Verizon approached Twenty-First Century Fox to buy some assets


News of competing interest in some of Murdoch’s assets broke even though the U.S. Justice Department was preparing a lawsuit to block AT&T Inc, the largest pay-TV provider in the United States, from buying Time Warner Inc for $85.4 billion, according to a source. This raised questions about the U.S. government’s willingness to allow large media industry mergers.

Source: Comcast, Verizon approached Twenty-First Century Fox to buy some assets: sources

EW Puts Technology-Based Forces at Risk | SIGNAL Magazine

Potential adversaries have seen the advantage the United States has gained from technology, but they also recognize that the edge it gives us could be an Achilles’ heel. An effective EW capability gives our adversaries an avenue to detect, disrupt, degrade, deny or alter key networks and systems as well as their information, crippling vital command and control.

Information warfare is underpinned by networks, which often are empowered by the radio frequency (RF) spectrum. An enemy that employs an RF attack on those networks can have a substantial impact on the information flowing through them and, consequently, the mission.

Source: President’s Commentary: EW Puts Technology-Based Forces at Risk | SIGNAL Magazine

Walking the Perimeter of the Home Station Tech Refresh | SIGNAL Magazine


These HSMCC (Home Station Mission Command Center) tech refreshes deliver a common equipment baseline through a deliberate and disciplined modernization method that provides a complete, integrated package of networking equipment and functional software to combat formations, from HSMCC to the dismounted soldier. Readiness is our number one priority, and this tech refresh ensures that the Army network is soldier-ready, anytime and anywhere.

As the Army expands the capacity of the entire global network, the need for speed in delivering this IT solution to the fighting edge is critical.

Source: Walking the Perimeter of the Home Station Tech Refresh | SIGNAL Magazine

DISA Sees the Light on Li-Fi | SIGNAL Magazine


The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is touting the potential benefits of light fidelity (Li-Fi) technology, a form of wireless, light-based communications. Li-Fi is expected to be more resistant to electronic signature detectors and therefore, less susceptible to electronic warfare techniques.

Lt. Gen. Alan Lynn, USA, the DISA director, stressed the need for the technology during the agency’s November 6 forecast to industry.

He also emphasized the need for software-defined networking, which Gen. Lynn said is inexpensive and versatile. He described a scenario in which warfighters will be able to hop from one network to the next, similar to radios that hop from one frequency to another.

Software-defined networking also will allow warfighters to create an “all new type of international networking” for whichever allies or partners show up to a fight.

Source: DISA Sees the Light on Li-Fi | SIGNAL Magazine

Cyber Experts Sound the Alarm | SIGNAL Magazine


For Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commanding general, U.S. Army Cyber Command, one important perspective “is that our adversaries are antagonists,” he said. “Their capabilities are ever increasing.”

At first it was exploitation of data, then disruption and after that destruction. Before it was attacks on networks or a series of networks, now it also is data and critical infrastructure and key resources.

“I think that we are starting to see the trailers [preview] of the future war,” Gen. Nakasone warned. Actors that the United States has not thought of, non-nation states, anonymous, proxy adversaries, will have an impact as antagonists against countries, the general predicted.

They are not only going after military networks, they are going after the economic might of that nation. “They are going after the key terrain that they know is fundamental to how a country operates.”

Source: Cyber Experts Sound the Alarm | SIGNAL Magazine

Patching Holes in Army Cyber Training | SIGNAL Magazine


“The biggest challenge is keeping pace with the threat,” declares Dale White, deputy director of the Cyber Battle Lab. “Our adversaries morph and change very quickly, especially in the cyber domain, and the biggest challenge is … doing experimentation that delivers capabilities that address the threat that is evolving on a monthly or weekly basis.

“We’re not building tanks that will be good for 10 years,” he continues. “We’re experimenting with capabilities that address requirements that shift very quickly. So, we need to figure how to keep pace with the threat at the same time we can quick-turn solutions … into the force.”

Source: Patching Holes in Army Cyber Training | SIGNAL Magazine

Peering Into Electronic Warfare’s Future | SIGNAL Magazine


Integrated photonics uses light-based microchips to process data much faster than traditional chips. In the electronic warfare (EW) world, integrated photonics can provide greatly increased frequency coverage and long-distance, low-loss transfer of analog signals compared with traditional radio frequency systems. According to studies by the Georgia Tech Research Institute, chip-scale integrated photonics also allows for potentially extensive reductions in size, weight and power needs.

He cites the microdrone swarming capabilities demonstrated last year by the Defense Department’s Strategic Capabilities Office and the Naval Air Systems Command as a particularly innovative effort. The test consisted of 103 Perdix drones launched from three F/A-18 Super Hornets.

The microdrones demonstrated advanced swarm behaviors, such as collective decision making, adaptive formation flying and self-healing. The diminutive aircraft can be equipped with tiny transmitters for jamming an adversary’s systems.

Source: Peering Into Electronic Warfare’s Future | SIGNAL Magazine