India’s Vast National Elections: What to Know | Council on Foreign Relations


The world’s largest democracy will head to the polls in April and May to elect a new parliament amid economic troubles, renewed tensions with Pakistan, and concerns about religious violence.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi is asking Indian citizens to give his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) another five years to deliver the economic transformation it promised in 2014, and to keep the country safe after a recent terrorist attack in Jammu and Kashmir State.

Disparate opposition parties, concerned about what rising Hindu nationalism means for India’s minorities, have banded together to try to unseat Modi.

Source: India’s Vast National Elections: What to Know | Council on Foreign Relations

Huawei admit Chinese law obliges companies to work with government, under conditions | EURACTIV.com


Chinese State Security Law forces companies based in the country to “provide assistance with work relating to state security,” a senior Huawei official in Brussels has said, adding however that the company “has never been requested to implement backdoors in its equipment.”

“It is true that Article 77 of the State Security Law sets out an obligation on organizations and individuals to provide assistance with work relating to State Security,” Sophie Batas, director for cybersecurity and data privacy at Huawei Europe told a Brussels event on Thursday (11 April).

Source: Huawei admit Chinese law obliges companies to work with government, under conditions – EURACTIV.com

Commission warns of connected cars delay if draft EU rules are rejected | EURACTIV.com


Plans to get connected cars on Europe’s roads could face a setback of “two or three years” should the Delegated Act on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) be rejected by MEPs this week, European Commission officials have said.

The debate centers around Commission plans for how vehicles should be connected in the future, either by using 5G or WiFi networks.

The proposal has been drafted as a Delegated Act, a fast-track procedure that legislates on the basis of input from EU countries.

Source: Commission warns of connected cars delay if draft EU rules are rejected – EURACTIV.com

Censorship fears linger as copyright directive overcomes final hurdle | EURACTIV.com

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A “censorship of the internet” could be in store as a direct result of the EU’s new rules on Copyright protection, a Polish government minister said on Monday (15 April), as EU member states approved the controversial plans after more than two years.

The member states voted in the Council on Monday to formalize their adoption of the EU’s copyright reform and the plans passed a qualified majority of 71.26%, just above the threshold of the required 65%.

However, there remained a degree of controversy over the reform, with particular attention directed at Articles 17 and 15.

Source: Censorship fears linger as copyright directive overcomes final hurdle – EURACTIV.com

German bosses urge government to stop EU proposal on connected cars | EURACTIV.com


The bosses of BMW and Deutsche Telekom have urged the German government to take action to block a European Commission proposal that would set a Wi-Fi-based standard for connected cars.

In a letter, BMW CEO Harald Krueger and Telekom’s Tim Hoettges warned that ruling out an alternative approach based on 5G mobile networks would leave Europe lagging rivals like China when it comes to the future of mobility.

“We are convinced that mandating Wi-Fi technology will cause significant delay to the European rollout of car-to-car and car-to-infrastructure communication,” the CEOs said in the letter to Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer, a copy of which was seen by Reuters.

Source: German bosses urge government to stop EU proposal on connected cars – EURACTIV.com

Bulc urges 5G advocates to focus on autonomous driving, leave connected cars to WiFi | EURACTIV.com


A European Commission plan to push WiFi as the technology of choice for connected cars over 5G has caused controversy. EU transport chief Violeta Bulc told EURACTIV in an interview that saving lives is the most important factor and WiFi is the only proven option

It’s quite simple really. First, WiFi is a proven technology and has almost no patents on it anymore. It’s available now, is easy to implement and it’s cheap. It’s affordable for everyone. One of the main political points during my mandate was to improve road safety and set up a systemic approach to it. I suffer personally when I see that 25,000 people lose their lives every year and 137,000 are seriously injured.

Now, people want us to wait three or four years in case the new technology becomes available. We have technology that can be deployed now and can save lives. I don’t want to be part of those statistics. I don’t want my kids, my friends, anyone a part of those three year statistics because we had the technology and didn’t act.

Source: Bulc urges 5G advocates to focus on autonomous driving, leave connected cars to WiFi – EURACTIV.com

Huawei CEO: EU doing a ‘great job’ in cybersecurity | EURACTIV.com

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Amid growing pressure from the US on European governments to reject Chinese tech firms, Huawei’s rotating CEO Ken Hu said on Tuesday (16 April) that the EU was doing “a great job” on cybersecurity.

In a keynote speech during its annual analyst summit in Shenzhen, where the company is based, Hu’s words were seen as a signal of the importance given by the company to European regulators. EURACTIV.com was invited to the summit.

Hu mentioned the cybersecurity center opened in Brussels in early March in order to increase the transparency of the work done in this field and the cooperation with stakeholders and European regulators.

Source: Huawei CEO: EU doing a ‘great job’ in cybersecurity – EURACTIV.com

Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law | EURACTIV.com

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Antitrust complaints are like London buses. You don’t get one for ages then four come at once in the same industry. That’s what has happened this past month in the auto sector.

First there was Daimler, then the supplier of onboard communications Bury, both German manufacturers at the vanguard of automotive communications technology.

This week, German’s Continental and France’s Valeo, two more leading automotive manufacturing companies, also filed complaints. And they likely won’t be the last.

They are all complaining about Nokia, one of a small handful of companies that own patents essential to standardized communications technologies that car makers and their suppliers need to connect cars to the internet.

Source: Connected cars: Licensing traffic jam drives automakers to turn to EU antitrust law – EURACTIV.com

‘We are talking about breaking monopolies like Facebook,’ says Barley, who tops SPD’s EU election list | EURACTIV.com

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In an interview with our partner DerTagesspiegel, German Justice Minister Katarina Barley explains why she wants digital firms to share their collected data with the public, and to limit the power of companies such as Facebook and Amazon.

Because, in addition to Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, who is actually also responsible for data security, I keep an eye, from the consumer’s point of view, on what happens to their data. This is very relevant to the health sector because data in that field is one of the most personal.

There needs to be a guarantee for security, more so than in any other area. This applies not only to how data is being processed and stored, but also to how it can later be used by the research sector in an anonymised and pseudonymised form.

Source: ‘We are talking about breaking monopolies like Facebook,’ says Barley, who tops SPD’s EU election list – EURACTIV.com

Flagship study exposes decline of press freedom in Europe | EURACTIV.com


Reporters Without Borders published their flagship annual ‘World Press Freedom Index’ on Thursday (18 April), revealing that worldwide, authoritarian regimes continue to tighten their grip on the media, while in Europe, decline of press freedom goes hand in hand with an erosion of institutions.

The RSF ranking, which evaluates the state of journalism in 180 countries and territories every year, shows how hatred of journalists has degenerated into violence, contributing to an increase in fear. The number of countries regarded as safe, where journalists can work in complete security, continues to decline.

Source: Flagship study exposes decline of press freedom in Europe – EURACTIV.com