PM Narendra Modi Served An Uncomfortable Message By IMF Boss Christine Lagarde


Christine Lagarde said she had told Prime Minister Narendra Modi that he did not mention the women of India enough in his speech to the summit and “it’s not just a question of talking about them”.

“I was hoping he would have said a bit more. Wish he had talked a bit about girls and Indian women,” she had then told NDTV.

Source: Kathua rape: PM Narendra Modi Served An Uncomfortable Message By IMF Boss Christine Lagarde

U.S. Is Still Segregated Even After Fair Housing Act | The Report | US News


Before signing the Fair Housing Act of 1968 into law, Johnson called it “among the proudest [moments] of my presidency.” Because of it, he predicted, “Negro families [will] no longer suffer the humiliation of being turned away because of their race.”

Then, reality set in: Uneven enforcement, deep-seated, cultural bias and the bill’s own flaws allowed bigoted mortgage bankers and unscrupulous landlords to preserve – and profit from – the status quo.

Source: U.S. Is Still Segregated Even After Fair Housing Act | The Report | US News

GOP in retreat on ObamaCare | TheHill


Republicans are retreating from calls to repeal ObamaCare ahead of this year’s midterm elections.

Less than a year after the GOP gave up on its legislative effort to repeal the law, Democrats are going on offense on this issue, attacking Republicans for their votes as they hope to retake the House majority.

Source: GOP in retreat on ObamaCare | TheHill

Myanmar policeman describes ‘trap’ to arrest Reuters reporter


A Myanmar police chief ordered officers to “trap” a Reuters reporter arrested in December, telling them to meet the journalist at a restaurant and give him “secret documents”, prosecution witness Police Captain Moe Yan Naing told a court on Friday.

The court in Yangon has been holding hearings since January to decide whether the pair will be charged under the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, which carries a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.

Source: Myanmar policeman describes ‘trap’ to arrest Reuters reporter

‘I Don’t Get Confused:’ How Nikki Haley’s Feminist Clapback Could Cost Her a Job | GovExec.com


Nikki Haley was just doing her job.

On Sunday (April 15), Haley, who serves as the US ambassador to the United Nations, announced that the Trump administration was planning to impose new sanctions on Russia. Haley said the sanctions would go into effect the following day.

But unbeknownst to Haley, the White House had reportedly decided to change direction—without telling her.

In an effort to fix the situation, and hopefully hide the evidence that no one in the Trump administration knows what’s going on, the White House resorted to a classic move: Blame the mistake on the woman involved.

Given Haley’s refusal to be patronized, the time of her exit may be drawing near.

Source: ‘I Don’t Get Confused:’ How Nikki Haley’s Feminist Clapback Could Cost Her a Job – Defense – GovExec.com

Five ‘Ethical Leadership’ Values In James Comey’s Book | GovExec.com


Comey writes about what he calls “ethical leadership” and notes that great companies “obsess over leadership talent—they hunt for it, test it, train it, and make it part of every conversation. They treat leadership talent like money.”

What does Comey see as important components of ethical leadership? Here are five main takeaways:

  1. The best leaders don’t overreact to mistakes and use them as teaching moments.
  2. Leaders create an environment where people want to do their best work.
  3. Leaders value humor that shows both confidence and humility.
  4. Leaders listen to dissenting opinions or facts.
  5. Leaders take the long view.

Source: Five ‘Ethical Leadership’ Values In James Comey’s Book – Management Matters – Management – GovExec.com

What lies behind the simplistic image of the happy Buddhist? | Aeon Essays


This diversity of practices and perceptions of them speaks to the fact that, contrary to popular Western perceptions, Tibetan Buddhism is hardly monolithic.

The Dalai Lama is not the pope of all Tibetan Buddhism, as many seem to believe, but the head of one of four major schools, the Gelugpa. The current Dalai Lama just happens to be a particularly famous frontman whose charisma has united diverse Tibetan Buddhists into one movement.

Today, he preaches cooperation between different forms of Tibetan Buddhism, but until the 1970s he embraced the veneration of an exclusively Gelug protector spirit – one that punished anyone who polluted the school with teachings from other traditions.

Source: What lies behind the simplistic image of the happy Buddhist? | Aeon Essays

Kim Jong-un has a maximum pressure and engagement strategy of his own


As it turns out, Kim’s not just good at maximum pressure, he’s also pretty good at maximum engagement.

Just a few months ago, the world braced for a possible war on the Korean Peninsula. But now Seoul and Pyongyang are reportedly planning to announce an official end to the Korean War as they enter the final days of planning for a summit between Kim Jong-un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

(An armistice ended the military conflict that lasted from 1950-1953, but the two Koreas are technically still at war.)

How did we go from belligerence to bear hugs?

Source: Kim Jong-un has a maximum pressure and engagement strategy of his own

Breaking Down Italy’s Persistent Political Instability | Pacific Standard


While the dust has yet to settle, the results of the 2018 elections already highlight several issues—both for Italy and for Europe more broadly.

On a national level, the elections have brought center stage a striking divide between Italy’s north and south, which are once again placing their trust in radically different parties.

The comparatively underdeveloped south almost unanimously voted for the inexperienced 5-Star Movement, which promises a monthly minimum income to fight poverty and unemployment.

Meanwhile, in the generally wealthier and more industrialized north, far-right parties led by Salvini and Berlusconi prevailed at the polls.

Source: Breaking Down Italy’s Persistent Political Instability – Pacific Standard

Some Republicans in Congress Are Worried About Asteroids Crashing Into Earth—but Not About Climate Change | Pacific Standard


Why would lawmakers, who seem prepared to think about long-term dangers to Americans, nevertheless deny that climate change is an important risk?

We cannot speak for the congressmen, but we quizzed everyone we talked to for this story. They came up with some interesting possibilities to explain a worldview that cares about asteroids, but is unconcerned about climate.

Eric Wolff, an Earth scientist at the University of Cambridge, notes that asteroids could come for anyone—regardless of socioeconomic status. With climate change, however, the wealthy—particularly those living in developed nations—have far more resources to move or adapt to a warmed world. D.C. politicians might not be inclined to worry too much about it.

Source: Some Republicans in Congress Are Worried About Asteroids Crashing Into Earth—but Not About Climate Change – Pacific Standard