Zero-trust networks to build on EIS | FCW


The General Services Administration’s 15-year, $50 billion next-generation telecommunications contract will be key for agencies implementing emerging secure network architectures that literally “trust no one,” according to a new white paper.

With its cadre of software-defined network (SDN) services and other advanced networking capabilities, the GSA’s Enterprise Infrastructure Services contract “is one of the core components of any zero-trust network,” Department of Education Chief Information Security Officer Steven Hernandez said at an April 17 ACT-IAC telecommunications and cybersecurity community of interest meeting.

Source: Zero-trust networks to build on EIS — FCW

Truck drivers see orders, miles fall in latest U.S. slowdown signal | Reuters

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At a truck stop in Ridgefield, New Jersey, driver Paul Richards reviews a notebook where he tracks miles driven and what he is hauling.

His paycheck is down about 25 percent from the same period a year ago, and his weekly miles have dropped as well.

Source: Truck drivers see orders, miles fall in latest U.S. slowdown signal – Reuters

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Microsoft turned down facial-recognition sales on human rights concerns | Reuters


Microsoft Corp recently rejected a California law enforcement agency’s request to install facial recognition technology in officers’ cars and body cameras due to human rights concerns, company President Brad Smith said on Tuesday.

Microsoft concluded it would lead to innocent women and minorities being disproportionately held for questioning because the artificial intelligence has been trained on mostly white and male pictures.

Source: Microsoft turned down facial-recognition sales on human rights concerns – Reuters

A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G | Defense One


Bottom line: Huawei leads the world in the ability to rapidly produce cheap telecom hardware (as well as the underlying software.) Recent reports, including one from NATO, state it plainly. It’s one reason why European countries, including U.S. allies like Germany and the U.K., have been reluctant to ban tech from Huawei outright, even in the face of heavy U.S. pressure.

But — quietly — many European countries like the U.K. and France actually are banning Huawei’s 5G tech in part by effectively quarantining it away from vital parts of infrastructure, or military and intelligence activities, according to James Lewis, senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“They don’t let Huawei near their sensitive intelligence facilities, their sensitive military facilities,” said Lewis.

Source: A New Consensus Is Emerging On How to Handle The Risk from China’s 5G – Defense One

How global value chains open opportunities for developing countries


Global value chains break up production processes so different steps—for building your smartphone, your TV, or your car—can be carried out in different countries.

More than two-thirds of world trade today takes place within value chains that cross at least one border during production, and often many borders.

Global value chains have been a boon to developing countries because they make it easier for those countries to diversify away from primary products to manufactures and services.

In the past, a country had to master the production of a whole manufactured product in order to export it.

With value chains, a country can specialize in one or several activities in which it has comparative advantage.

Source: How global value chains open opportunities for developing countries

Who does the choosing under school choice?


.. In light of the national discourse, it is important to critically assess the arguments both for and against school choice proposals, and the rigorous evidence behind them.

In a recent, randomized controlled trial study, we assessed a common critique of school choice—that when given the option, schools discriminate against students who are perceived as harder to educate, therefore restricting certain students to lower-quality schools and consequently exacerbating educational disparities.

To minimize the extent to which schools can cherry-pick top students, many school choice districts must use a lottery system or a common application to determine who is admitted. Despite these safeguards, schools can employ subtle practices to recruit the students they would prefer, for example by encouraging or discouraging applications from certain types of students.

Source: Who does the choosing under school choice?

Contractors: Get ready for tighter DOD supply chain enforcement | FCW


The Defense Department has been ramping up efforts to quash supply chain vulnerabilities with enhanced cybersecurity guidance that gives the organization greater access to contractors’ security protocols and controls even before awarding a contract.

According to Tom Tollerton of the accounting firm Dixon Hughes Goodman’s cybersecurity advisory team, DOD has been firing off a series of memos and guidance since late 2018 aimed at tweaking contracting language and improving security conditions pre-award.

The most recent of which was in January from Ellen Lord, DOD acquisition head, designating the Defense Contracting and Management Agency with assessing contractors’ compliance with the NIST 800-171 in the cybersecurity framework by reviewing purchasing systems.

Source: Contractors: Get ready for tighter DOD supply chain enforcement — FCW

President’s Commentary: NATO Must Back Up Talk With Action | SIGNAL Magazine

The phrase, “These are critical times for the NATO alliance,” has been used so often it is almost a cliché. But these times are not defined by a cliché, as the alliance faces multiple challenges within and without.

Deliberate discussion has always been the method of determining NATO policy and direction, but the window for that approach is narrowing. NATO must decisively confront several challenges.

Recently, the NATO framework has come under increased scrutiny and stress from friend and foe alike. Russia has made military moves into Georgia and Ukraine, annexing Crimea and intimidating the Baltic states.

Countries that are NATO members have faced continuous pressure and intimidation from Russian influence operations. Key military leaders will readily admit that we are now in Phase III of military operations in the cyber domain.

Source: President’s Commentary: NATO Must Back Up Talk With Action | SIGNAL Magazine

The ACC Makes its Cyber Move | SIGNAL Magazine

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Last year, the Air Force announced it was moving the 24th Air Force, which specializes in cyber operations, and the service’s Cyber Mission from the Air Force Space Command to the Air Combat Command. This spring, the Air Combat Command is working on the merger of those cyber components with its intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities from the 25th Air Force and integrating cyber into its operations.

The move, which started eight months ago, signifies a shift in the Air Force’s emphasis on putting cyber into everyday operations, said Col. Chad Raduege, USAF, who has been nominated for appointment to brigadier general, director of cyberspace and information dominance, Air Combat Command (ACC).

“There was a realization that we need to get cyber off their plate to allow them to focus on the space realm,” Col. Raduege said.

Source: The ACC Makes its Cyber Move | SIGNAL Magazine

NATO Cyber Policy Under Construction | SIGNAL Magazine


NATO is taking a comprehensive approach to building a cyber policy that would deter adversaries, defend its member nations and provide key capabilities in multidomain operations. This approach to the alliance’s cyberspace strategy takes into account resilience, counter-cyber activities and operational capabilities in both civilian and military elements.’

Maj. Gen. Wolfgang E. Renner, GEAF, commander, NATO Communications and Information Systems (CIS) Group and deputy chief of staff cyberspace at Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE), explains the rationale for this comprehensive approach to the cyber challenge.

“You can’t solve it in the military arena, you can’t solve it in the civilian sector—it really is not just multidimensional. It’s comprehensive.”

Source: NATO Cyber Policy Under Construction | SIGNAL Magazine