Fellow Academics Defend Avital Ronell After Harassment Claims | The Atlantic


While it’s unclear how much demonstrations of support from one’s colleagues determine the outcome for the person accused of misconduct, there have been several examples of powerful men in academia who faced disciplinary action but were allowed to stay on the job. In some cases, male professors managed to skirt punishment altogether for years, even as egregious allegations of sexual harassment mounted.

One factor: Universities are hierarchical. At the apex is the chief executive officer—often a president or chancellor—and under that person are the deans of individual schools within the university; then there are the heads of the school’s often-decentralized academic departments, who typically enjoy immense influence over departmental decisions, from salaries to curriculum.

Less officially, tenured professors hold a great deal of sway, determining their own research and teaching priorities while getting some say over departmental decisions. At the bottom: the untenured academics—hourly wage adjuncts, grant-funded researchers, contracted instructors, and the like.

Source: Fellow Academics Defend Avital Ronell After Harassment Claims – The Atlantic

8th Annual Peak Cyber | CSTTF


Like all forensic process, digital examinations follow the rigor of repeatable, non-repudiatable process so that the same result happens every time you follow your workflow and that others may have the same results as well.

There is also observation and instinct, visual representations, timelines and associations and connections that lend this process an element of art.

This lecture/live data demonstration is intended to educate the attendee to the level that they comprehend the entire workflow, from evidence seizure to expert testimony.

There is no fee to attend this optional program

Source: 8th Annual Peak Cyber – CSTTF

A New Approach to Developing the Whole Leader | GovExec.com


Survey after survey of CEOs suggests developing leadership talent is mission critical for future success. Many of those same surveys describe the reality that organizations are falling far short of meeting their needs for leader development.

My experience gained in the trenches over three-decades in the tech sector corroborates Jeffrey Pfeffer’s conclusions. I spent gobs of money on training, coaching, and outside resources, yet in hindsight, I perceive I was complicit in the game of event and check-box development.

It wasn’t evil intent—no conscientious objective professional or executive disagrees with the goal of developing more and more effective leaders—but it was an outcome of poor prioritization and a general lack of whole-person thinking about leader development. And while we sent people to some remarkable training and coaching organizations, those were prestigious checkmarks, not sustaining and whole-person approaches.

Source: A New Approach to Developing the Whole Leader – Promising Practices – Management – GovExec.com

U.S. banks teach financial literacy with hands-on experience


Recent research suggests that pairing financial literacy efforts and tangible experience has a greater impact on positive money management: higher credit scores, less debt and higher savings rates. But there is some disagreement about how to measure that impact.

Initiatives are popping up all over the United States to help young people, lower-income communities and those lacking a formal banking relationship improve their interactions with the financial services industry.

Source: U.S. banks teach financial literacy with hands-on experience

Switzerland: IoT Innovation Hub | EE Times

Rather than teaching students just computer science or SoC design alone, David Atienza, professor and director of Embedded Systems Laboratory at EPFL, came to EPFL (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne) a decade ago intent on training students who will be eventually versed in both hardware and software.

This “full-stack” approach was so new 10 or 12 years ago that most academic institutions — tied to traditional curricula — balked at Atienza’s ideas. EPFL, however, rolled the dice.

As Atienza sees the world of electronics, here’s the lay of the land. Over the last few decades, chip designers and software developers have gotten used to doing their own thing — independent of one another — with the former just focused on their own hardware designs and the latter on software development. Atienza sees a widening of the gap between two communities increasingly decoupled.

Source: Switzerland: IoT Innovation Hub | EE Times

Should We Let English Eat the World?


Skull Face is radicalized by the notion that the English language is taking over the world and aligning human thought with Anglo-American interests.

A few dominant languages do, indeed, seem to be taking over.

Every two weeks, a language disappears.

By 2100, up to 90 percent of languages might be gone, overtaken by the likes of Spanish, Russian, Mandarin—and English.

A headline last week from The Guardian read: “Behemoth, bully, thief: how the English language is taking over the planet.”

For even a fraction of that 90 percent of languages to survive, The Guardian suggests, “we’re going to have to start thinking of smaller languages not as endangered species worth saving, but as equals worth learning.”

But try telling that to children in developing countries.

Source: Should We Let English Eat the World?

People with strong self-control experience less intense bodily states like hunger and fatigue | Research Digest


You may think of people with high self-control as having enviable reserves of willpower, but recent findings suggest this isn’t the case. Instead it seems the strong-willed are canny folk, adept at avoiding temptation in the first place.

The new findings make sense: after all, it is much easier to be in control of your decisions if you are organized enough to ensure your animalistic needs rarely become overpowering.

Source: People with strong self-control experience less intense bodily states like hunger and fatigue – Research Digest

The 5 Biggest Challenges Facing Embedded Software Developers in IoT | Design News


Developing embedded software is not as simple as it used to be. Creating a standalone device was and still often is challenging for many development teams.

In the IoT age, in which we are starting to connect absolutely everything—including toothbrushes—system complexity is skyrocketing. The traditional, disconnected developer is finding that there are multiple new challenges that need to be addressed in order to achieve success:

  1. Challenge #1 – Connectivity
  2. Challenge #2 – Over the Air-Updates
  3. Challenge #3 – Security
  4. Challenge #4 – Debugging
  5. Challenge #5 – The Rate of Change

Source: The 5 Biggest Challenges Facing Embedded Software Developers in IoT | Design News

Is There Too Much Money in Art? | Arts | Smithsonian Second Opinion


Does art matter to most people? Or is art elitist?

It does matter, and it’s a far less elitist art world than it has probably been at any time in history.

In the past, great art was restricted to the wealthy, or to royalty, or to the church. The wealthy had the opportunity to see art and would own the best art. Often, they were the only ones who thought much about its existence.

Source: Is There Too Much Money in Art? | Arts | Smithsonian Second Opinion

Program Management Is Much More Complex Than Many Leaders Understand | GovExec.com


The assessment framework describes four different sets, or quadrants, of leadership skills that contribute to effective organizational performance. Janet Weiss, University of Michigan, notes that these skill sets “are in tension with one another and each of the quadrants in some way represents contradictory pushes and pulls on the organization.”

Furthermore, “each quadrant has a dominant managerial style which matches the kinds of organizational performance that are valued by the organization.”

  1. The “collaborate” quadrant
  2. The “create” quadrant
  3. The “get results” quadrant
  4. The “control” quadrant

Source: Program Management Is Much More Complex Than Many Leaders Understand – Promising Practices – Management – GovExec.com