Military Health System Isn’t Ready for Battlefield Injuries | US News


Surgical readiness in the Military Health Service is fraying fast. A nine-month U.S. News investigation has uncovered mounting evidence that military medical leaders are squandering a valuable wartime asset: the surgeons and surgical teams that save lives on the battlefield and back home.

The investigation is the latest chapter in a continuing U.S. News probe of military health care. Interviews with more than two dozen active-duty and retired military surgeons and a confidential survey of Army surgeons and Pentagon records obtained by U.S. News have found:

  • Severe shortages of skilled surgeons, especially trauma surgeons, on active duty and in the reserves.
  • Army field hospitals that “are not staffed with appropriate specialty capabilities for a combat theater.”

Source: Military Health System Isn’t Ready for Battlefield Injuries | National News | US News

NSA chief explains new cyber directorate | FCW


The National Security Agency’s new cyber directorate wants to bridge gaps between government agencies and the defense industrial base, according to the agency’s chief Gen. Paul Nakasone.

“NSA’s new cybersecurity directorate, which opened for business last week, will give us a laser focus on these challenges,” said Nakasone, who also leads U.S. Cyber Command, during an Oct. 9 keynote at the FireEye Cyber Defense Summit in Washington, D.C.

Nakasone named three reasons behind standing up the cybersecurity directorate, which is headed by Anne Neuberger and stood up Oct. 1: to combat an evolving threat landscape, capitalize on ability to set security standards and make vulnerability assessments, and enhance partnerships with Cyber Command, Homeland Security, FBI and industry.

Source: NSA chief explains new cyber directorate — FCW

Will America embrace national service?


This paper examines the case for national service, highlights the various ways in which that service could unfold, and concludes that large-scale national service is needed in America now.

America’s civic health is in significant decline. The percentage of Americans who say others can be trusted fell from 46 percent in 1972 to just 31 percent in 2016, with 36 percent of whites and 17 percent of Blacks expressing such trust; and, in recent years, trust in the media, government, and the courts has fallen to historic lows.

It is no surprise that communities are fraying in places like Charlottesville, Ferguson and Baltimore, and that America is not fulfilling its potential, as political institutions suffer from partisan gridlock, and the institutions that serve as checks on power and as guarantors of individual rights are increasingly under attack.

Source: Will America embrace national service?

Why Agencies Need to Tap the Revolutionary Potential of Behavioral Science | Government Executive


The field of behavioral science has evolved significantly over the past 30 years, but most of the benefits have accrued to private sector marketers and economists.

Nonetheless, governments are starting to see the benefits of applying the field’s insights. According to Apolitical, an international online magazine covering the public sector, “over the past nine years, a revolution has been spreading through governments around the world.

Today, over 200 public bodies are using a combination of behavioural science, economics and psychology to craft better policy.”

This “revolution” is happening in parallel to several other related efforts to connect the use of evidence and experimentation to policy and practice: performance measurement, program evaluation, design thinking, the use of agile principles, and the expanded use of data and analytics.

What Is the potential? Because it is inherently a multi-disciplinary field, behavioral science insights have the potential to reinforce the broader trends of connecting evidence and experimentation to policy and practice.

Source: Why Agencies Need to Tap the Revolutionary Potential of Behavioral Science – Government Executive

Former Navy Secretary: Effective Cybersecurity Requires Persistent Presence | Nextgov


If you lead an organization of any size in the United States today, you sit atop a powerful technology stack. Your communications, calendar and finances coordinate instantly, globally—as long as the networks keep working, and you have access to that data. Disrupting those networks creates chaos.

In nearly eight years as Secretary of the Navy, I faced a steep challenge on how to manage cyber threats at the pace of 8 million attempted intrusions a day in an organization of 900,000 people.

Here’s how we maintained presence in the cyber domain—and you can too …

Source: Former Navy Secretary: Effective Cybersecurity Requires Persistent Presence – Nextgov

Pew Survey Finds Most Americans Know Little About Privacy, Social Media, and Cybersecurity | Fortune


Although more dependent on technology than ever before, Americans don’t generally understand critical tech topics like privacy policies, two-factor authentication, or which social media apps Facebook owns.

The insights come from a survey published Wednesday by Pew Research Center, which quizzed nearly 4,300 U.S. adults about their tech IQs. The results showed that Americans were able to correctly answer multiple choice questions about phishing scams and website cookies but struggled with topics like private browsing and specifics about Facebook and Twitter.

Source: Pew Survey Finds Most Americans Know Little About Privacy, Social Media, and Cybersecurity | Fortune

The ‘power pose’ may be overrated, but civil discourse is essential | FCW


This posture distinction hit the big time after research by Amy Cuddy and her colleagues at Harvard Business School. Cuddy coined the phrase “power pose” to describe the expansive, confident stance. A 2012 TED talk by Cuddy on the power pose, with 50 million views to date, is the second-most downloaded TED talk ever. One of my daughters tells me that she has practiced the power pose before going into job interviews, and she is clearly not alone.

A recent NextGov post, however, presents academic literature suggesting that the benefits of the power pose are a myth.

Source: The ‘power pose’ may be overrated, but civil discourse is essential — FCW

Federal HR designed for stability not agility | FCW


The federal hiring process doesn’t match the changing nature of agency work, according to Margaret Weichert, who until recently served as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management.

Weichert, who is deputy director of management at the Office of Management and Budget, told attendees at an Oct. 9 GovExec event that government needs to rethink its hiring model to draw potential applicants who may not fit the typical mold of a federal worker.

“Our human capital structure is not designed to be agile, it’s designed to be stable,” Weichert said.

Source: Weichert: Federal HR designed for stability not agility — FCW

Why older people should be allowed to change their legal age | Aeon Ideas

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Let’s say that on average you are in better shape than other people of your age. You are more able than them: quicker, sprightlier, livelier. You feel and identify as younger than your official age. However, despite all your youthful energy, you are also discriminated against because of your greater age.

You cannot get a job – or, if you do, you might earn less than some of your younger coworkers simply due to your advanced years.

The question is, should you be allowed to change your ‘official’ age in order to avoid this discrimination and to better match how you identify and feel?

Source: Why older people should be allowed to change their legal age | Aeon Ideas

Senate: No clear solutions to combat foreign election meddling | FCW


The United States Senate released the second volume of its report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, this time focusing on online influence campaigns carried out by the Internet Research Agency and Russian intelligence agencies.

The committee’s report endorses more transparency around online advertising, but its own investigation found that such ad buys were so minor they paled in comparison to the free exposure operators were able to get from simply using the platforms themselves to spread content.

“Paid advertisements were not key to the IRA’s activity, and moreover, are not alone an accurate measure of the IRA’s operational scope, scale, or objectives, despite this aspect of social-media being a focus of early press reporting and public awareness,” the committee wrote.

Source: Senate: No clear solutions to combat foreign election meddling — FCW