Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | US News


While DACA remains in legal limbo, the educational rights of children no matter their legal status were codified by the Supreme Court in 1982. In Plyler vs. Doe, the justices held that age-appropriate children are entitled to a K-12 public education regardless of their immigration status. Districts also can’t implement policies or practices that might have a chilling effect on immigrant student enrollment, such as requiring Social Security numbers on paperwork.

Plyler vs. Doe was back in the headlines in late April after Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos told a congressional committee it was “a local community decision” whether students suspected of being in the country illegally would be reported to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. She walked back her remark in a subsequent hearing two weeks later.

Source: Schools Offer Support for Immigrant Teachers, Students | The Report | US News

These are the conversations you need to have as a new manager


It happened: You’re a new manager now.

Perhaps it’s the first time you’re leading a team. Or you’re taking over a new team as a manager. Either way, that first meeting as a new manager is a daunting event. What should the agenda for that first meeting with the new team be? How should you set expectations as a new manager? Should you make prepare some sort of “new manager introduction speech”?

  • Build trust, don’t chart a vision (yet)
  • Get to know your team members–and take notes
  • Share who you are, more than surface-level stuff
  • Make it clear that you’re in “learning mode”
  • Ask 2 to 4 probing, thoughtful questions
  • Be proactive in your next steps
  • Be prepared for tough questions

Source: These are the conversations you need to have as a new manager

This is how to turn your idea for change into a movement


“This is the place where often I find business leaders or individuals and companies falling down. Social organizers are really good at bringing vision to life through storytelling, and I think that’s something that business people can learn from,” she says.

That boils down to a series of steps, Jennifer Dulski says. To create change in your organization, consider these priorities of successful movement-starters.

  1. Create a clear and compelling vision
  2. Know the influencers—and what they care about
  3. Build a team of allies
  4. Be informative and transparent
  5. Take the temperature
  6. Get ready for the long game

Source: This is how to turn your idea for change into a movement

People who think their opinions are superior to others are most prone to overestimating their relevant knowledge and ignoring chances to learn more | Research Digest

The researchers distinguish “belief superiority” from “belief confidence” (thinking your opinion is correct). Belief superiority is relative – it is when you think your opinion is more correct than other people’s; the top end of their belief superiority scale is to indicate that your belief is “Totally correct (mine is the only correct view)”.

The pair set out to find people who felt their beliefs on a variety of controversial political issues (things like terrorism and civil liberties, or wealth redistribution) were superior, and to check – using multiple choice quizzes – how well they were informed on the topics about which they held these superiority beliefs.

Source: People who think their opinions are superior to others are most prone to overestimating their relevant knowledge and ignoring chances to learn more – Research Digest

Leaders, Don’t Be the Cheese in the Panini | GovExec.com


When you’re in a designated leadership role, there are certain opportunities that accrue to you because you’re the incumbent in the role.

Examples of these things include goal setting, resource allocation, team selection and development, information flows and relational access.

Pretty much all of the things that give you leverage in your role are related to leadership activities. Your leverage will rarely if ever come from your subject matter expertise.

Focus on the things that only you can do as the designated leader.

Source: Leaders, Don’t Be the Cheese in the Panini – Executive Coach – Management – GovExec.com

Yes, Impostor Syndrome is Real: Here’s How to Deal With It | Time


Have you ever felt like you don’t belong? Like your friends or colleagues are going to discover you’re a fraud, and you don’t actually deserve your job and accomplishments?

If so, you’re in good company.

These feelings are known as impostor syndrome, or what psychologists often call impostor phenomenon.

Source: Yes, Impostor Syndrome is Real: Here’s How to Deal With It | Time

Unpacking the Stereotype of the Unsmiling Russian


After we get our coffees and find seats, she tells me that she finds Americans’ unfailing cheer—the smiles and “how are yous” of neighbors, servers, cashiers, and journalists—tiring.

Russian culture, she says, has a different set of standards for polite behavior.

Even dealing with a simple “How are you?” felt complicated. People in Russia didn’t engage in this kind of social script, and to her it seemed unnecessary. Did they really want to know how she was? No.

Anybody who asked only did so in anticipation of a “fine!” or “great!” that would ease them into the next part of the conversation.

If she answered honestly (“I’m tired”), which is what felt most natural, she worried she’d come off as rude.

And when she preempted the awkwardness by asking “How are you?” first, she felt disingenuous.

Source: Unpacking the Stereotype of the Unsmiling Russian

How Journalists Pin Down the President

.. There was finally a fifth question on the subject. Trump was asked, “Would you ever consider removing the sanctions without significant improvements in the human rights situation?”

The apparent lesson to take away is that persistence and citing prior quotes are the best measures for pinning down the president. It’s noteworthy that it was the tough question, followed by reminding Trump what he had said to a national television audience just months earlier, that pushed him to address the issue more thoroughly.

Source: How Journalists Pin Down the President

Campus protests should stop at the door of the classroom | Aeon Ideas


Not that universities should encourage student protests, but neither should they try to quash them.

What universities must insist on, however, is that student protests be compatible with the larger functioning of the university; they should not hinder the ability of anyone on campus to pursue their own activities or the central mission of the university in advancing and disseminating knowledge.

There are a lot of people on a college campus, and university administrators need to coordinate their activities without getting in each other’s way.

Protests are legitimate among those activities, but they do not take priority.

Source: Campus protests should stop at the door of the classroom | Aeon Ideas

Why News-Style Inverted Pyramids Enhance Executive Communication


Maximize executives’ leverage with three communication steps:

1) Prepare yourself and the executives in advance,

2) deliver in a news-style inverted pyramid,

3) follow through.

Start by anticipating their perspective, situation, understanding, assumptions, objectives, priorities, concerns, and preferences for how they receive information.

Sometimes you already know these. Sometimes the executives will tell you. Sometimes you need scouts and spies: scouts who have been through the drill, spies like executive assistants who see everything and are happy to share if you ask for their help in giving their bosses more leverage.

Source: Why News-Style Inverted Pyramids Enhance Executive Communication