The UN Doubles Its Workload on Cyber Norms, And Not Everyone Is Pleased | Council on Foreign Relations


The United Nations is set to double its workload as it relates to the international security dimensions of cyberspace over the next few years.

Last week, the General Assembly’s first committee adopted two separate (and some would say competing) resolutions on the actions of states in cyberspace. One resolution, sponsored by Russia, creates an open-ended working group of the General Assembly to study the existing norms contained in the previous UN GGE reports, identify new norms, and study the possibility of “establishing regular institutional dialogue … under the auspices of the United Nations.”

The other resolution, sponsored by the United States, creates a new Group of Governmental Experts (GGE) to study how international law applies to state action in cyberspace and identify ways to promote compliance with existing cyber norms.

Source: The UN Doubles Its Workload on Cyber Norms, And Not Everyone Is Pleased | Council on Foreign Relations

Cybersecurity ‘moonshot’ panel sends recommendations to White House


The report also issued a dire warning on the future of attacks, saying that over the next 10 years the U.S. will see “more severe and physically destructive cyber attacks than have been experienced to date,” and that cyber threats need to be viewed as “an existential threat to the American people’s fundamental way of life.”

But how to prepare for tomorrow’s threat today is the challenge, according to Peter Altabef, chairman of the moonshot subcommittee and CEO of security firm Unisys.

Source: Cybersecurity ‘moonshot’ panel sends recommendations to White House

Pakistani Air Force, Government Hacked by Foreign Country | US News


The Irvine, California-based company Cylance released a report Monday saying that a group it calls “The White Company” hacked into various elements of Pakistan’s military and intelligence networks with the intent of stealing data and, later, openly harassing the government.

Cylance first identified the intrusion in 2017 and says the hack may still pose a threat to the Pakistani government as well as others in the region.

The disclosure is concerning pertaining to a nuclear-armed nation like Pakistan, whose control over its arsenal of weapons has at times been a source of concern for Western leaders.

Source: Report: Pakistani Air Force, Government Hacked by Foreign Country | World | US News

In Jimmy Carter’s Georgia Hometown, Telemedicine Takes Root | US News


Telehealth, in which patients can consult with medical professionals over the internet instead of in person, is seen as one way to provide specialized health care in rural Georgia, with related plans to expand broadband internet access in the state as well.

Both broadband and telehealth are tied to larger efforts to revitalize rural Georgia’s economy in the 21st century, and the state legislature is expected to take up bills addressing each when it reconvenes in January.

Telehealth and broadband also took a turn in the spotlight during the recent Georgia governor’s race, with Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams making a campaign stop at Mercer Medicine Plains.

Source: In Jimmy Carter’s Georgia Hometown, Telemedicine Takes Root | Healthiest Communities | US News

Environmentalists Warm to Nuclear Amid Climate Change Threat | US News


Environmental groups are easing their opposition to nuclear power after decades of dire warnings and protests, conceding that – despite its shortcomings – the clean energy it produces is a key component in holding at bay the more urgent threat of climate change.

Source: Environmentalists Warm to Nuclear Amid Climate Change Threat | Politics | US News

Is AI Resilient Enough for Security? | SIGNAL Magazine


Artificial intelligence can be surprisingly fragile. This is especially true in cybersecurity, where AI is touted as the solution to our chronic staffing shortage.

It seems logical. Cybersecurity is awash in data, as our sensors pump facts into our data lakes at staggering rates, while wily adversaries have learned how to hide in plain sight.

We have to filter the signal from all that noise. Security has the trifecta of too few people, too much data and a need to find things in that vast data lake. This sounds ideal for AI.

A new field known as adversarial AI asks how easy is it to fool a smart computer. It turns out to be very easy.

Source: Is AI Resilient Enough for Security? | SIGNAL Magazine

The Secret Life of Metadata on the Battlefield | SIGNAL Magazine


Data from mobile device signals such as GSM may be an untapped resource for signals intelligence on the battlefield. Although the payload of a communication system is encoded, information about the nature of the communication that is included in the GSM signal is not and should not be overlooked. This information, known as metadata, could prove to be an important tool for warfighters, experts say.

This type of behind-the-scenes information, which Stanford University describes as data about data, provides details about when, where, by whom and in what format data was sent.

In the case of GSM-based signals, metadata may reveal the sensor position—latitude and longitude—and the details of the antenna as well as information on the signal—the time, frequency, bandwidth, amplitude, line of bearing, specific emitter identification, multiplexer, digital multiplexer and more.

Source: The Secret Life of Metadata on the Battlefield | SIGNAL Magazine

DISA Tells Industry: Be Our Partner | SIGNAL Magazine


Dana Deasy, chief information officer, DOD, echoed sentiments about having ongoing dialogue with industry partners and stressed DISA’s prominence, saying the agency is threaded through everything at the Defense Department.

“Cloud, AI, C3 and cyber all will have their unique challenges as we move forward. DISA will provide expert support for each of these areas as we continue to modernize our capabilities at DOD,” Deasy said.

The mantra at the DOD that he has been pushing hard is cyber first, cyber always. So, what does that mean exactly for industry partners?

Source: DISA Tells Industry: Be Our Partner | SIGNAL Magazine

Communications Top Defense Technology Wish List | SIGNAL Magazine


Many of the technology targets on the radar for Griffin’s office arise from advances made by near-peer and peer adversaries. As with many other top U.S. defense officials, Michael Griffin, U.S. undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, points out that for 15 years the military focused its technology lens on defeating terrorism in asymmetrical operations while neglecting to explore new military capabilities that could be applied across the broad spectrum of combat operations.

U.S. adversaries used that period of technological inactivity to pursue their own research thrusts, which has helped them close what had been a large gap favoring U.S. military capabilities.

Now, the United States must reignite its technology fuse or risk losing its spark to adversaries.

Source: Communications Top Defense Technology Wish List | SIGNAL Magazine

SIGNAL Coverage: TechNet Asia-Pacific 2018 | SIGNAL Magazine


Technologies need to be less centralized and people need to be more informed if the Indo-Pacific region is to improve its cybersecurity, according to a panel of experts.

Source: SIGNAL Coverage: TechNet Asia-Pacific 2018 | SIGNAL Magazine