As 5G rollout begins, Pentagon still doesn’t understand impact on military aircraft | Breaking Defense


Today, after multiple delays and months of negotiations with the airline industry, Verizon and AT&T will begin rolling out 5G nationwide, in a move the commercial aviation community says will have dire safety implications.

Airline executives warned in a Jan. 18 letter that, without safeguards in place around airports and runways, the rollout could cause “catastrophic disruption” and “economic calamity.” Despite an agreement by Verizon and AT&T on late Tuesday to limit 5G services around major airports to prevent interference, some international airlines such as Emirates and Lufthansa canceled flights to the United States due to concerns about potential effects on the Boeing 777.

Source: As 5G rollout begins, Pentagon still doesn’t understand impact on military aircraft – Breaking Defense Breaking Defense – Defense industry news, analysis and commentary

Major airlines cancel, change flights to US over 5G dispute | AP News


Major international airlines canceled flights heading to the U.S. or changed the planes they’re using Wednesday, the latest complication in a dispute over concerns that 5G mobile phone service could interfere with aircraft technology.

Some airlines said they were warned that the Boeing 777, a plane used by carriers worldwide, was particularly affected by the new high-speed wireless service. The aircraft is the workhorse for Dubai-based Emirates, a key carrier for East-West travel, and its flight schedule took one of the biggest hits.

Source: Major airlines cancel, change flights to US over 5G dispute | AP News

CrackBerry Cracks: BlackBerry Officially Terminates its Smartphones


Time is up for the original BlackBerry smartphones, the devices whose addictive utility led to them being dubbed “CrackBerries” by users who found they couldn’t live without their constant connection.

As of January 4, BlackBerry discontinued the legacy services for BlackBerry 7.1 OS and earlier, BlackBerry 10 software, BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.1, and earlier versions. Devices running these legacy services and software through either a cellular carrier or Wi-Fi connections will no longer reliably function, including for data, phone calls, SMS, and 9-1-1 functionality.

Source: CrackBerry Cracks: BlackBerry Officially Terminates its Smartphones

Lockheed, Verizon Agree to Collaborate on 5G Tech Offering for Defense Clients | GovCon Wire


Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) and Verizon (NYSE: VZ) have signed a partnership agreement to develop 5G technology platforms intended for U.S. military use across all battlefield domains.

Under a strategic deal, the two companies aim to produce an integrated 5G.MIL network that can support the Department of Defense’s communications infrastructure and its joint all-domain operations framework, Verizon said Tuesday.

Source: Lockheed, Verizon Agree to Collaborate on 5G Tech Offering for Defense Clients – GovCon Wire

France hopes for 5G market worth €15 billion by 2025 | EURACTIV.com


France aims to invest nearly €1.7 billion in its 5G market, Industry Minister Agnès Pannier-Runacher and Secretary of State for Digital Cédric O announced on Tuesday morning (6 July) while presenting the country’s 5G and future telecommunications strategy that is eyeing a 5G market worth €15 billion by 2025. EURACTIV France reports.

“We have taken the time to remove the doubts (…) and now we must accelerate,” Agnès Pannier-Runacher announced at the start of a presentation of the “national strategy on 5G and future telecommunications network technologies”.

To contribute to its 2025 strategy of reaching a 5G market worth €15 billion, the government announced €480 million in public funding to support priority projects between now and 2022. By 2025, the funding should grow to €735 million.

Source: France hopes for 5G market worth €15 billion by 2025 – EURACTIV.com

Polish trial begins in Huawei-linked China espionage case | EURACTIV.com


An espionage trial involving a former Polish secret services agent and an ex-employee of Huawei begins in a Warsaw court on Tuesday (1 June) as some European states consider whether to exclude the Chinese group’s equipment from their 5G telecom networks.

Poland arrested the two men in January 2019 on suspicion of spying for China, in a move that has ramped up international debate over the potential security risks of using Huawei equipment in communications networks.

Source: Polish trial begins in Huawei-linked China espionage case – EURACTIV.com

3G Sunset Spells Trouble for Many Medical Tracking Devices | EE Times


Amidst the (hopefully) final throes of a brutal global pandemic, seniors and their families in the U.S. this year will face additional problems in 2022. The closure of major 3G networks will mean the end of the line for older mobile personal emergency response system (mPERS) devices used by the elderly across America.

Hundreds of thousands of these vital medical tracking devices will be rendered inoperable by the 3G shutdown, leaving elderly users and caregivers scrambling to switch to 4G and Wi-Fi-based devices. The upgrade cost, at least $150, comes at a time of great economic hardship for many ordinary folk.

The first Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) units were invented in Germany in the early 1970s. Initial PERS were bulky, and used a pendant linked to a landline phone, which tied the elderly to their home.

Source: 3G Sunset Spells Trouble for Many Medical Tracking Devices | EE Times

Europe moves towards 6G | Shaping Europe’s digital future


The proposal for the Joint Undertaking on Smart Networks and Services (SNS) towards 6G, adopted last week by the Commission, is part of the Single Basic Act establishing the set of nine Joint Undertakings under Horizon Europe. There is an earmarked €900 million of Commission funding, to be matched through co-funding by industry. The proposal will now be discussed among Member States in the Council with a planned launch later this year.

Source: Europe moves towards 6G | Shaping Europe’s digital future

Biden picks Jessica Rosenworcel as acting FCC chief


President Joe Biden has picked Jessica Rosenworcel to run the Federal Communications Commission as its acting chair, making the 49-year-old lawyer and podcast host from West Hartford, Connecticut, the second woman to be appointed to that role in the commission’s 96-year history. The job involves such daunting tasks as helping millions of Americans get reliable access to the internet.

Rosenworcel, aleady a member of the commission, is not only the second woman to lead the FCC (the first, Mignon Clyburn, served for nearly 6 months as interim chair, in 2013), she is also the first mother to lead the agency. She has two school-aged children, and when she’s not crafting the nation’s tech and media laws, she’s trying to ensure that her kids are doing their school work remotely during the pandemic.

Source: Biden picks Jessica Rosenworcel as acting FCC chief

Gigabit subsidies are a waste of taxpayer dosh | Light Reading


There is little sympathy from the Public Accounts Committee (PAC), a government spending watchdog, which today slammed Johnson’s intervention in the UK’s broadband sector. Weeks before he became prime minister, Johnson envisaged a universal fiber service by 2025. Downgraded from this “future-proof” technology to a gigabit-for-all pledge when he took office, the target was lowered again in November. Gigabit services for at least 85% of the population would do, said authorities. The rest might have to wait a bit longer. But £5 billion ($6.8 billion) worth of taxpayer money was earmarked for connecting the hardest-to-reach 20% of homes.

Source: Gigabit subsidies are a waste of taxpayer dosh | Light Reading