AT&T and Time Warner: Reaction to US Mega Merger | Via Satellite

Given that AT&T owns DirecTV, one of the largest satellite pay-TV operators, the deal has significant ramifications for the satellite sector given that AT&T now has huge presence across the U.S. media landscape. The deal also contains some eye-watering figures.

“Time Warner will be a positive for AT&T’s income statement, at least initially. But it will be a negative for the balance sheet. The new AT&T will carry an astounding $249 billion of debt (inclusive of operating leases and post-retirement obligations).

If pro forma AT&T were a country, it would place 32nd on the list of highest total debt burdens, between Indonesia (at $335 billion) and the United Aarab Emirates ($220 billion),” Craig Moffett, founding partner at MoffettNathanson Research, wrote in a research note.

Source: AT&T and Time Warner: Reaction to US Mega Merger – Via Satellite –

Saving net neutrality: How Congress could overturn the FCC’s repeal | Vox


Net neutrality still has a shot at survival, but its vital signs are weakening.

As of June 11, 2018, the FCC’s controversial repeal of the 2015 act that enshrined net neutrality into law has officially taken effect.

That means net neutrality, currently, no longer exists.

Source: Saving net neutrality: How Congress could overturn the FCC’s repeal – Vox

Comcast offer for Fox expected after favorable AT&T ruling


Tuesday’s ruling signaled that federal regulators might have a hard time stopping companies from getting bigger by gobbling up rivals and the content they own. Even if a company doesn’t need to get bigger right away, it might need to do so to prevent a competitor from doing so.

For starters, expect Comcast to make a bid for Fox’s entertainment business as early as Wednesday.

These mega deals — some in the works, some still to come — will transform the media landscape and change how people consume entertainment.

Here’s a look at some of the pending and possible combinations …

Source: Comcast offer for Fox expected after favorable AT&T ruling

Networking & Data Center Technologies | The Data Center Steps Forward to Dance Closer to Consumers


The telecom industry outside of the data center has a slightly different technology infrastructure. In a switching office, for instance, the physical size and layout of the cabinets, cooling, power sources, cabling, and overall environment are different.

This is one of the motivating market factors that led ADLINK and Radisys to collaborate and create the OCP carrier grade CG-OpenRack-19 and OpenSled Server specifications within the newly formed OCP Telecom Group.

This initiative lays the foundation for OCP gear in a telecom environment (OCP Carrier Grade, or OCP-CG). In essence, OCP-CG is pushing OCP architecture outside the data center to include telecom, mobile, and customer premises equipment (CPE), effectively opening up this open-architecture environment beyond data center walls. open-architecture environment beyond data center walls.

Source: Networking & Data Center Technologies » Wallflower No More: The Data Center Steps Forward to Dance Closer to Consumers

EU caps price of international phone calls in landmark telecoms overhaul | EURACTIV.com


The European Parliament scored a victory after months of heated negotiations as the European Commission and national diplomats agreed to limit the price of phone calls between EU countries to 19 cents per minute.

Text messages will be capped at 6 cents per SMS for consumers within the bloc.

Source: EU caps price of international phone calls in landmark telecoms overhaul – EURACTIV.com

States defy FCC repeal of net neutrality | TheHill


Washington and Oregon have already passed their own laws to fill the void left by the FCC’s repeal, and California appears to be close behind after the state Senate passed a net neutrality bill on Wednesday.

A total of 29 states have proposed their own open internet legislation, according to Gigi Sohn, a fellow at Georgetown Law who’s been tracking the initiatives.

And five Democratic governors have gone with another tactic: issuing executive orders that prohibit the state from doing business with any broadband company that violates the principles of net neutrality.

Source: States defy FCC repeal of net neutrality | TheHill

California Senate votes to restore net neutrality | The Verge


After the FCC moved to eliminate net neutrality rules, states began implementing their own measures. In January, over 20 attorneys general sued the commission before the order was even published. Some governors attempted to use executive orders, while others worked with legislators. California’s bill to restore protections in the state is one of the toughest responses to the FCC’s rollback.

The bill would reinstate rules similar to those in the FCC’s 2015 Open Internet Order. It forbids ISPs from throttling or blocking online content and requires them to treat all internet traffic equally.

But the bill also takes the original rules further by specifically banning providers from participating in some types of “zero-rating” programs, in which certain favored content doesn’t contribute to monthly data caps.

Source: California Senate votes to restore net neutrality – The Verge

Pentagon cracks down on personal mobile devices | FCW


Under a new policy memo released May 22, DOD personnel, contractors and visitors to the building and supporting facilities in Arlington County, Va., are restricted from having mobile devices in areas designated or accredited for “processing, handling, or discussion of classified information.”

Source: Pentagon cracks down on personal mobile devices — FCW

Bill to preserve ZTE sanctions clears committee | FCW


The amendment, less than a page long, modifies the $62.5 billion appropriations bill for Commerce, Justice and Science to specify that no funds may be used in contravention of an April 23 order put out by the Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security that instituted a seven-year ban on ZTE from buying parts and components from U.S. technology companies.

Source: Bill to preserve ZTE sanctions clears committee — FCW

Five unintended benefits of 5G | EDN


While fixed internet access is positioned to be the first major 5G application, many more are in the wings, including mobile applications.

The huge investments in components, equipment, and know-how will spin off benefits outside of directly 5G networking. Here are five I’ve identified.

  1. mmWave everything
  2. Phased-array radar
  3. Point-to-point mmWave backhaul
  4. Gaming
  5. Disrupting the edge

Source: Five unintended benefits of 5G | EDN