Where Huawei Fears to Tread | Light Reading


It took Huawei about 28 years to become the world’s biggest supplier to communications service providers. Founded in 1987, it finally overtook the 139-year-old Ericsson in 2015.

But its loss of the coveted top spot could happen in a relative heartbeat. (See How the West Can Hurt Huawei and Huawei: New King of the CSP Market.)

Government authorities or operators in six countries, including a few of the world’s biggest economies, have now restricted Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. in some manner, supposedly out of concern that Chinese vendors are a threat to security.

Source: Where Huawei Fears to Tread | Light Reading

Commission says Europe should be ‘worried’ about Huawei | EURACTIV.com


Huawei is one of the ‘tech’ champions in China, and one of the more popular Chinese companies abroad.

It is the leading mobile infrastructure company in the world and its smartphones are second only to Samsung in terms of global sales.

However, Australia, New Zealand and the US have decided to ban Huawei as the provider for the 5G network. British Telecom has also decided not to include the Chinese company in its selection to set up the 5G network.

In 2012, a US Congress’s report warned that the company represented a security risk and warned phone companies not to buy its equipment.

Source: Commission says Europe should be ‘worried’ about Huawei – EURACTIV.com

Adtran Buy Adds On-Prem Visibility | Light Reading

In an interview with Light Reading, Jeremy Harris, director of portfolio management for subscriber solutions and experience, said SmartRG’s residential gateway products and SmartOS software would be integrated into Adtran Inc. (Nasdaq: ADTN)’s product mix, including its Mosaic system. The aim is to give network operators a comprehensive view that covers the customer’s on-premises WiFi network for both better troubleshooting and orchestration but also new service potential.

“It will be a different paradigm for the operator because instead of, when trying to troubleshoot issues, first looking at the access network, then if they can’t find the problem there, moving to the customer environment to start to troubleshoot things, you will have one view with one rolled-up correlated data set that has the entirety of the network and the ability end-to-end to identify problems and orchestrate things, across the entirety of the access and the in-home network,” he says.

Source: Adtran Buy Adds On-Prem Visibility | Light Reading

Huawei: The Signs Were There | Light Reading

The Commerce Department subpoenaed Huawei’s US head office in 2016 over alleged illicit shipments to Iran and four other countries — Syria, Cuba, North Korea and Sudan.

And according to Reuters, the Justice Department was running a probe out of the US attorney’s office in Brooklyn since at least early this year.

There is also a ZTE Corp. (Shenzhen: 000063; Hong Kong: 0763) internal document (which the Commerce Department has made available) in which a company, F7, is praised as being better at evading sanctions laws.

Source: Huawei: The Signs Were There | Light Reading

Ciena Positioned to Profit From Huawei Backlash | Light Reading


In a note issued Thursday, Raymond James Financial Inc. (NYSE: RJF) analyst Simon Leopold said Ciena Corp. (NYSE: CIEN), with “essentially zero China sales,” is best positioned (again, from his coverage scope) to reap opportunities from a Huawei backlash.

Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK) and Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERIC) also stand to benefit, as they are not US-based and, of course, are not Huawei, he added.

Source: Ciena Positioned to Profit From Huawei Backlash – Analyst | Light Reading

5G Glimpse Shows Glitz and Warts | EE Times


So far, it’s a mixed bag of blessings and curses. For example, the demos were cool, but there were few of them.

Tests of millimeter-wave services are going better than expected, said carriers. In addition, handset makers have an unnamed alternative supplier of mmWave RF front ends beyond the module that Qualcomm announced in July.

Plenty of 5G handsets are in the works, but most won’t be available until sometime next year. The lack of support for frequency duplex division in the current 5G modems is delaying deployment in sub-6-GHz bands until late 2019 for AT&T and possibly other carriers.

Source: 5G Glimpse Shows Glitz and Warts | EE Times

Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says | The New York Times


Fast internet service is crucial to the modern economy, and closing the digital divide is seen as a step toward shrinking the persistent gaps in economic opportunity, educational achievement and health outcomes in America. In some areas with spotty or no service, children do their homework in Wi-Fi-equipped buses or fast-food restaurants, small businesses drive to internet hot spots to send sales pitches and medical records are transported by hand on thumb-drive memory sticks.

Accurate measurements on the reach of broadband matter because the government’s statistics are used to guide policy and channel federal funding for underserved areas.

Source: Digital Divide Is Wider Than We Think, Study Says – The New York Times

Pennsylvania’s Broadband Challenges Are Worse Than Thought | Route Fifty

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Researchers at Pennsylvania State University spent much of this year studying internet speeds across the state, and found that only a small fraction of residents—just under 10 percent—live in areas that meet the Federal Communication Commission’s minimum speed needed for broadband connectivity.

Most of those areas that meet the federal minimum standard are, as shown in green below, in the state’s major population centers, including Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Harrisburg.

Source: Pennsylvania’s Broadband Challenges Are Worse Than Thought – Route Fifty

US asks allies to shun Huawei equipment over espionage fears | EURACTIV.com


The US government is trying to persuade wireless and internet providers in allied countries to avoid telecommunications equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday (22 November).

The move would further pile pressure on the world’s biggest telecom gear maker, which is under scrutiny from Western intelligence agencies for its perceived ties to China’s government and the possibility its equipment could be used for espionage.

Source: US asks allies to shun Huawei equipment over espionage fears – EURACTIV.com

CommScope gobbles up Arris for $7.4B | FierceTelecom


CommScope has inked a deal to buy telecommunications equipment maker Arris in an all-cash deal valued at $7.4 billion.

After years of being the biggest fish in wireless and wireline deals, Arris was gobbled up by CommScope, which is now one of the biggest fish in the telecommunications sea.

Arris brings its customer premise equipment, which includes access devices such as broadband modems, gateways and routers as well as video set-top boxes, into CommScope’s product line. Arris also has a network and cloud division that combines broadband and video infrastructure with cloud-based software solutions.

Source: CommScope gobbles up Arris for $7.4B | FierceTelecom