(256) Diversity in the IC: Does Reality Match Aspiration? | YouTube


The current national conversation about race and diversity is an inflection point that provides opportunity to talk critically about the IC’s successes and challenges in progressing towards its workforce ideals. Hear from panelists at the Intelligence & National Security Summit 2020.

Hero or scoundrel? An iconoclastic biography of Winston Churchill | Aeon Videos


Most mainstream portrayals of Winston Churchill, such as the critically acclaimed film The Darkest Hour (2017), focus on his role in the Second World War, standing tall in the face of potential Nazi obliteration with a combination of brilliant foresight, fighting spirit and soaring rhetoric. While this is, of course, an important part of the celebrated British prime minister’s legacy, the characterization paints an extremely incomplete picture of his life, leaving out a great number of important, unflattering facts.

This short from the UK filmmaker Steve Roberts deploys a combination of claymation and biting iconoclasm to shine a light on the failing-up nepotism, political opportunism and murderous white supremacy that are often glossed over in surface-level treatments of Churchill’s biography.

Source: Hero or coundrel? An iconoclastic biography of Winston Churchill | Aeon Videos

How America could lose its allies – 2020 Election | YouTube


For 150 years, the US avoided formal alliances. It occasionally went to war — fighting the War of 1812, the Spanish-American War, and World War I — but did so without entangling itself in promises to other countries. Then, after World War II, it abruptly changed course, and began to build a network of alliances unlike anything that had come before. Over the next few decades, the US used those alliances to keep countries around the world close, and to fight Soviet expansion, by making a promise that it would go to war if any of its allies were ever attacked. After the Soviet Union fell, the initial purpose of those alliances was gone, but the US recommitted to them, signaling again and again that the central promise of those relationships was still in effect. It kept doing so for the next 25 years. Then the US elected a leader who took America’s global relationships in a new direction.

President Trump was skeptical that America’s network of alliances was still beneficial to the US. He began to distance the US from those alliances, raising doubts about whether America would actually follow through on the promise at the core of them if provoked. Some allies moved closer to Russia or China, both of whom had attempted to undermine America’s alliances. Today, the future of those alliances is on the ballot in the US. One of the major presidential candidates in the 2020 election wants to return the US to its former status with its allies; the other finds its decades-old alliances costly and cumbersome. The world is waiting to see which vision Americans prefer.

How America can leave fossil fuels behind, in one chart | YouTube

A few weeks ago we asked you a question: What do you think the candidates in the 2020 US election should be talking about?

Over 10,000 of you responded, and this is the first in a series of videos based directly on your answers.

The Brexit stalemate explained | EURACTIV.com


Nearly four years after the UK voted to leave the European Union, we are back to a familiar conundrum: deal or no deal. Except that this time we are talking about the trade agreement that will govern future EU-UK relations.

If the result is ‘no deal’, the UK will leave the Single Market on 1 January and trade with the EU on World Trade Organisation terms.

So what are the main dividing lines?

The UK is seeking a ‘zero tariff, zero quota’ free trade agreement, similar to the EU-Canada trade pact.

It has also rejected the EU’s demands for unchanged access to UK fishing waters, the UK committing not to roll back standards in environment and labor law – known as the ‘level playing field’ – and the UK following EU state aid law now and into the future.

This is the price the EU is asking for a free trade agreement. But on all three counts little progress has been made.

UK ministers complain that the EU does not recognize the UK as a sovereign equal. “The EU, essentially, wants us to obey the rules of their club, even though we’re no longer members,” Cabinet minister Michael Gove told the House of Commons this month.

Source: The Brexit stalemate explained – EURACTIV.com

The Brexit stalemate explained | EURACTIV.com

Nearly four years after the UK voted to leave the European Union, we are back to a familiar conundrum: deal or no deal. Except that this time we are talking about the trade agreement that will govern future EU-UK relations.

If the result is ‘no deal’, the UK will leave the Single Market on 1 January and trade with the EU on World Trade Organisation terms.

So what are the main dividing lines?

The UK is seeking a ‘zero tariff, zero quota’ free trade agreement, similar to the EU-Canada trade pact.

It has also rejected the EU’s demands for unchanged access to UK fishing waters, the UK committing not to roll back standards in environment and labor law – known as the ‘level playing field’ – and the UK following EU state aid law now and into the future.

This is the price the EU is asking for a free trade agreement. But on all three counts little progress has been made.

UK ministers complain that the EU does not recognize the UK as a sovereign equal.

“The EU, essentially, wants us to obey the rules of their club, even though we’re no longer members,” Cabinet minister Michael Gove told the House of Commons this month.

Source: The Brexit stalemate explained – EURACTIV.com

The Craziest COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories | Design News


.. the internet continues to be a breeding ground for silly conspiracy theories, with the COVID-19 pandemic now the latest topic of interest for these theorists who may be less familiar with the scientific method.

While the origins and solutions of COVID-19 are solidly understood and follow the expectations epidemiologists have been explaining for years, the seemingly abrupt rise of the virus has unsettled people, so they are looking for answers that make sense to them, even if these answers don’t make sense to anyone else because they are irrational and/or demonstrably untrue or physically impossible.

Some of our favorites in the current COVID-19 conspiracy hall of shame include the following …

Source: The Craziest COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories | Design News

How to Make Your Own COVID-19 Mask | Smithsonian Magazine


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends wearing cloth face masks in public settings where social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, the agency announced Friday evening. The guidance is considered a voluntary precaution to be used in addition to social distancing and proper hand-washing.

Taking into account recent evidence that people can still spread the virus if they are not showing symptoms, the CDC reversed their initial advisory that surgical masks and N-95 respirators be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders.

Source: How to Make Your Own COVID-19 Mask | Smart News | Smithsonian Magazine

2019 Nobel Prize Winners in Economics Present: Good Economics for Hard Times | World Bank Live

Immigration and inequality, globalization and technological disruption, slowing growth and accelerating climate change — these are sources of great anxiety across the world, from New Delhi and Dakar to Paris and Washington, D.C. The resources to address these challenges are there-what we lack are ideas that will help us jump the wall of disagreement and distrust that divides us. If we succeed, history will remember our era with gratitude; if we fail, the potential losses are incalculable.

In this revolutionary book, renowned MIT economists Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo take on this challenge, building on cutting-edge research in economics explained with lucidity and grace. Original, provocative, and urgent, Good Economics for Hard Times makes a persuasive case for an intelligent interventionism and a society built on compassion and respect. It is an extraordinary achievement, one that shines a light to help us appreciate and understand our precariously balanced world.

Source: 2019 Nobel Prize Winners in Economics Present: Good Economics for Hard Times | World Bank Live

Boeing | Air Show in Review

The 53rd International Paris Air Show takes place June 17 to 23, 2019, at Paris-Le Bourget Airport.

Source: Boeing: Paris Air Show 2019