How to enjoy coffee | Psyche Guides


Coffee hasn’t always received the attention it deserves. In many Western countries especially, the beans were low quality. Drinkers didn’t know or care about how coffee was produced, bought or brewed. A lot of coffee was cheap and tasted bitter, and its purpose was practical: medicine or fuel.

But over the past few decades, things have started to change around the world. A global band of intrepid producers, buyers, roasters, baristas and scientists have been elevating coffee to the craft level, like fine wine and beer. You might think that you know what coffee tastes like – roasted, toasty and bitter – but that’s only a sliver of the variety available to you now.

Source: How to enjoy coffee | Psyche Guides

Anger at the Pentagon is coming from both sides of the aisle | Roll Call


President Joe Biden wants to move past the chaotic U.S. exit from Afghanistan. But bipartisan anger over the rushed evacuation burst into the open on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. In a worrisome sign for the president, Democrats joined the calls for continued investigation.

Much of the anger was aimed at the top leaders of the Defense Department, Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley.

Fireworks came first from the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which took testimony from Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken, but was rebuffed in its request for testimony from Austin.

Source: Anger at the Pentagon is coming from both sides of the aisle – Roll Call

Biden’s dug a hole for himself, but he keeps digging | Roll Call


Ed Koch, the late colorful mayor of New York, was famous for asking his constituents, “Hey! How’m I doin’?” That’s a question most politicians ought to ask once in a while, never more so than Joe Biden as his summer slide accelerates into a grim September of one crisis after another. If public opinion polls are an indicator, he’s not going to like the answer he’s going to get.

In essence, political surveys are the statistical equivalent of Koch’s trademark question. Most surveys test what people think of the job Biden is doing as president of the United States. While surveys test a range of questions in different ways, two standard questions form the basis for analyzing the current political strength of any president and his administration: The president’s overall job approval and approval of his handling of voters’ top concern.

Source: Biden’s dug a hole for himself, but he keeps digging – Roll Call

GOP Senate candidates backed legal challenges to the 2020 election | Roll Call


At least nine Republican Senate candidates have a political résumé with a contentious item: filing or actively supporting one of the failed lawsuits that furthered former President Donald Trump’s false claims that the 2020 election was rife with fraud.

Since many GOP candidates support Trump’s claims, participating in lawsuits could help some stand out in crowded Republican primaries, where they need to win over Trump supporters who still say voter fraud played a role in President Joe Biden’s win.

Source: GOP Senate candidates backed legal challenges to the 2020 election – Roll Call

Hispanic IT leaders pioneer new paths to the top | CIO


Growing up in the barrio in San Antonio, Texas, and later attending a private school on scholarship, Jesse Carrillo got adept early on at playing to a diverse crowd. The tech-inclined Carrillo didn’t exactly fit in with the rough gangs at home. Yet at school, he stood out from the wealthy, mostly white student population as one of a handful of Latinos.

Instead of identifying with one group over the other, Carrillo did what any resourceful kid might: He learned how to adapt quickly to different expectations and cultures. The character trait became a lifelong lifesaver — it kept him from being bullied as a kid on the streets and later empowered him to navigate a career in the predominantly white IT industry where he now serves as CIO.

Source: Hispanic IT leaders pioneer new paths to the top | CIO

Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market | Axios


Plant-based meat firms aren’t just going after vegans and vegetarians anymore. They’re betting that closely mimicking the taste of meat will let them chip away at the meat-eating market too.

Why it matters: Diets that include meat — especially beef — have a steep climate impact. If plant-based protein gains popularity, more and more people could reduce or even halt their meat consumption.

Giving up meat “is the single largest thing an individual can do to reduce their carbon footprint,” says Glenn Hurowitz, who runs the environmental advocacy organization Mighty Earth.

Source: Fake meat companies pursue meat-eating market – Axios

Extreme summer weather’s climate change links in Pacific Northwest, Europe | Axios


The rapid succession of precedent-shattering extreme weather events in North America and Europe this summer is prompting some scientists to question whether climate extremes are worsening faster than expected.

Why it matters: Extreme weather events are the deadliest, most expensive and immediate manifestations of climate change. Any miscalculations in how severe these events may become, from wildfires to heat waves and heavy rainfall, could make communities more vulnerable.

Driving the news: The West is roasting this summer, with heat records falling seemingly every day. Forests from Washington State to Montana to California are burning amid the worst drought conditions of the 21st century.

Source: Extreme summer weather’s climate change links in Pacific Northwest, Europe – Axios

A Rising China’s Culture Wars Are Just Getting Started


To many people who follow events in China closely, two announcements made in the past month by the Chinese government seemed like reasonably foreseeable developments, if not entirely predictable in their timing or details.

In the first, Beijing said that it was committed to combating the grueling common workplace culture known as 996, which stands for 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week. Placing such heavy demands of self-sacrifice for the benefit of corporations was unhealthy for society, the state concluded, in a belated judgment that follows more than a generation of high-speed growth characterized by utter domination of workers by the managerial class. In fact, the problem is so big that, now that it has been officially recognized, Chinese media have been able to frame the need for more unstructured, personal time as all but a matter of human rights. And although it might sound ironic for the world’s largest socialist society, one of the remedies, or reforms, that has been mooted has hinted at breaking another taboo: allowing trade unions to actually organize directly on behalf of their members.

Source: A Rising China’s Culture Wars Are Just Getting Started

Fidelity unlocks the power of data by transforming its pipeline | CIO


Nearly four years ago, Mihir Shah had a vision for fundamentally changing Fidelity Investment’s data strategy. Then CTO, Shah pushed to become the company’s first ever enterprise head of data architecture and engineering to enact that vision, what he calls a “next-generation data pipeline.”

At the center of that vision was one key tenet: “No matter what your role is, we want to make data available to you to make your job easier and to make your decision-making better,” he says.

Source: Fidelity unlocks the power of data by transforming its pipeline | CIO

French government to double railway freight by 2030 | EURACTIV.com


As the French minister for Transports, Jean-Baptiste Djebbari, announced on Monday, the French government will invest 170 million euros per year until 2024 in order to double the transport of goods by rail by the end of the decade.

This “strong and unprecedented engagement” is supposed to help the railway sector double the volume of goods transported within France by 2030, an objective of the newly voted climate law, given that railway freight is more ecological than road or airfreight.

Source: French government to double railway freight by 2030 – EURACTIV.com